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It's time for new shoes

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    • max.patch wrote:

      Not hiking related, but since zero drop was mentioned...anyone else here old enough to admit they wore the original Earth Shoes with the negative heel? I know I had at least one pair. The company only existed from 1970-77 so the "Earth Shoes" you get today are by another company that bought the rights to the name.

      i.pinimg.com/originals/73/42/9…8add755df8c2b23914739.jpg
      That was a few years before my time, but can we go back to that style of advertising that actually tells us something about the product in a straightforward manner? I miss that.
      Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.
    • max.patch wrote:

      One of my son's wanted a lava lamp in the early 2000s. Didn't think I'd find one - but I did. So if you look hard enough...
      So far as I know they're still really popular in college dorms. I'd probably have one in my house if I wasn't so sure that my two arsehole cats would make short work of it.

      Superfluous photo of the delinquents in question.
      Images
      • AA211DDD-E25C-4592-B970-D5BBF64192F1.jpeg

        190.71 kB, 688×600, viewed 42 times
      Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.
    • It looks like I’m going to have surgery on my bunion in January. The pain in my foot is almost constant and radiates across the top of my foot.

      I dread it so bad. The thought of not being able to do vigorous exercise for months and needing a year to fully recover is horrible to think about. I think there’s a 50% chance that I’ll back out at the last minute.

      My biggest fear is that the pain will be worse afterwards and I’ll never be able to hike again.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      It looks like I’m going to have surgery on my bunion in January. The pain in my foot is almost constant and radiates across the top of my foot.

      I dread it so bad. The thought of not being able to do vigorous exercise for months and needing a year to fully recover is horrible to think about. I think there’s a 50% chance that I’ll back out at the last minute.

      My biggest fear is that the pain will be worse afterwards and I’ll never be able to hike again.
      Sorry to hear this TJ. Is the recovery really a full year? That would suck, but I assume the Dr. would not be recommending this if he did not think you will be better off on the other side of this.

      Good luck whatever you choose.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      It looks like I’m going to have surgery on my bunion in January. The pain in my foot is almost constant and radiates across the top of my foot.

      I dread it so bad. The thought of not being able to do vigorous exercise for months and needing a year to fully recover is horrible to think about. I think there’s a 50% chance that I’ll back out at the last minute.

      My biggest fear is that the pain will be worse afterwards and I’ll never be able to hike again.
      Sorry to hear this TJ. Is the recovery really a full year? That would suck, but I assume the Dr. would not be recommending this if he did not think you will be better off on the other side of this.
      Good luck whatever you choose.
      IMScotty did a great job of putting into words what I thought when I read this.

      I know Bill Walton said minor surgery is something that is done on someone else. But with your background in the Healthcare industry I am sure you will choose a good doctor/surgeon, and dedication to rehab also seems to be a key to success.

      I wish you well with moving forward. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      It looks like I’m going to have surgery on my bunion in January. The pain in my foot is almost constant and radiates across the top of my foot.

      I dread it so bad. The thought of not being able to do vigorous exercise for months and needing a year to fully recover is horrible to think about. I think there’s a 50% chance that I’ll back out at the last minute.

      My biggest fear is that the pain will be worse afterwards and I’ll never be able to hike again.
      Way back in 2006? I had mine removed in early January and hiked all of the below the rim trails at Bryce Canyon at the end of April. Yes my foot still hurt some. We would hike a 4-6 mile after breakfast and then I would elevate and ice my foot (if needed) and then do another trail after lunch.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • I'm sure the surgery techniques have improved since mine was done. I stayed awake for mine with just a local anesthesia and I read a book while they operated on me. I wouldn't do that again. It wasn't bad until after he had removed the bunion and then realigned my big toe by breaking my foot. I still remember that awful sound of my bone snapping. They didn't tell me they were going to do that!!!
      The first week of recovery was the worst of course, things got better fast after that. I'd do it again but with general anesthesia.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      I'm sure the surgery techniques have improved since mine was done. I stayed awake for mine with just a local anesthesia and I read a book while they operated on me. I wouldn't do that again. It wasn't bad until after he had removed the bunion and then realigned my big toe by breaking my foot. I still remember that awful sound of my bone snapping. They didn't tell me they were going to do that!!!
      The first week of recovery was the worst of course, things got better fast after that. I'd do it again but with general anesthesia.
      Yes…I’m having a newer procedure called lapiplasty which uses hardware to permanently keep the toe aligned. There’s a risk that the hardware will cause permanent discomfort and some people have to have the hardware removed or revised.

      Supposedly this procedure is less painful and you walk sooner. After a few weeks, I’ll move to a boot until 8 weeks then a regular shoe. Except the surgeon says because of my job, I’ll have to wear a boot while at work for 3-4 more weeks. Then there will be intermittent swelling and full recovery takes one year.

      JJ, I thought that backpacking will be impossible because there’s no way to ice it on the trail. How did you do it? Soak it in cold streams?

      And it’ll be general anesthesia. I wanted to do a local and wear ear plugs but he says no.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • TJ,

      At Bryce I iced at the hotel, Ruby's lodge. After 4 months my foot was still a little swollen, but I was still able to get it into my over the ankle hikers that I was using back then. But yeah after that I did soak it in some streams. My bunion was in the early stages, it hadn't gotten as big as a golf ball- I'd seen what they did to my mom's feet, so when they told me it was a bunion, I got it cut off ASAP. I never wore a boot that I remember, just a massive gauze wrap for a couple of weeks. 8 or 9 stitches I think. He just ground the bunion off with a dremel like tool and then broke my foot like a wishbone and packed and taped a gauze roll between toes to hold my big toe over. The whole thing was pretty primitive.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • My podiatrist also made me two sets of inserts, one for dress shoes and another for sneakers/casual/athletic shoes. I used them until I wore them out- a couple of years -and then switched to the moldable otc ones as I figured my gait had been corrected. I've had no problems since. Oh I did go to about a month of PT during my healing as part of the operation in which they had me do stuff like pick up marbles with my toes and stand on one of those pool noodles in the long direction. I'd say my foot was at least 75% healed at 6 months.
      Definitely get the pain meds before the anesthesia completely wears off.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Or then again, maybe it isn't...

      First time ever that I have had the outer part of my trail shoe outlast the insole. My Lone Peak Altras (IV's I think) have several hundred miles on them, but still have some tread. They ain't pretty, but they still work. Problem is the insoles have become so worn they have holes in them and are sloshing around in my shoes at times....



      So, I thought I would buy my first ever insoles. I have never needed extra cushion, so I have never tried this before.
      I wanted a flat, zero drop insole with no arch support. I settled on a slightly pricey pair from 'North Sole'.
      I ordered them oversized so that I could cut them down to match the Lone Peak insoles with their weirdly wide toe box. Not all insoles can be cut down.



      The results...
      Well, I have not done any big hikes yet, but they feel like new shoes again (and they smell better too) :)

      Some rough math, given the steep price for a new pair of Altras, I'd say if I get another hundred miles out of these shoes I will break even. But, I hope to doing better than that.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Or then again, maybe it isn't...

      First time ever that I have had the outer part of my trail shoe outlast the insole. My Lone Peak Altras (IV's I think) have several hundred miles on them, but still have some tread. They ain't pretty, but they still work. Problem is the insoles have become so worn they have holes in them and are sloshing around in my shoes at times....



      So, I thought I would buy my first ever insoles. I have never needed extra cushion, so I have never tried this before.
      I wanted a flat, zero drop insole with no arch support. I settled on a slightly pricey pair from 'North Sole'.
      I ordered them oversized so that I could cut them down to match the Lone Peak insoles with their weirdly wide toe box. Not all insoles can be cut down.



      The results...
      Well, I have not done any big hikes yet, but they feel like new shoes again (and they smell better too) :)

      Some rough math, given the steep price for a new pair of Altras, I'd say if I get another hundred miles out of these shoes I will break even. But, I hope to doing better than that.
      Hang on to them after the Altras wear out, and maybe you can extend the next pair too! :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      Foot surgery is scheduled for the end of January…ugh. It’ll be 8 wks before I can wear a regular shoe and 4 months before resuming regular activity.

      Gonna miss the good hiking and biking weather but will get in lots of knitting and fiddling.
      It'll be worth it.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference