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    • I believe it is called that because it is administered by a guasi government authority of the state of Maine. It was "gifted" to the people of Maine with very strict conditions.
      Possibly it helps the state of Maine feel good at how much of the state looks good on a map without having to make more government land park. It is surrounded by logging operations.
      Resident Australian, proving being a grumpy old man is not just an American trait.
    • I have done a bit of reading. The trees in the park are harvested from the park's Scientific Forest Management Area.

      Hmmm... Fishing and some hunting is allowed, except the hunting of moose.

      Dirt roads, no stores, no running water, and no electricity.

      Well, I guess they need the money from user fees, wood products, and hunting to keep it wild. Only thru-hikers are allowed to camp one night without fee. A maximum of 12 says wikipedia.

      Lets see 'cool moist climate' and '100 inches of snow per year'. Well, I would call that cold not cool. But I have rarely lived where it snowed, if at all, less than a foot per year. Most of it, under 4 inches of snow, if it shows up at all.

      Anyway.

      Governor Baxter bought up land using his personal fortune over a 32 year period. No problem there. Other governors in their states do things with their money.

      But if its going to be forever wild, then the hunting and fishing, and cutting down trees, seems to contradict that. Yes, I know many forests are 'managed' by cutting down trees. I disagree with that part.

      Methinks the AT should be moved out of Maine, and completed in Vermont or New Hampshire. The BSP obviously doesn't want hikers there, accomidate them.

      Wiki also points out the park say a 75000 visitor number in 2000 which dropped to 55000 in 2005. Slowly going back up. Well, maybe to preserve the wild, they need to stop everyone from using the park.

      And since it isn't a state park, they should rename it. Baxter's Wild Forever Park.
      --
      "What do you mean its sunrise already ?!", me.
    • hikerboy wrote:

      JimBlue wrote:

      Da Wolf wrote:

      baxter is not a state park
      Then why is its title Baxter State Park ?
      its run by the baxter state park authority, not by the state itself.
      By statue an Authority is owned by state, county or federal. No one else can have an Authority.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • JimBlue wrote:

      I have done a bit of reading. The trees in the park are harvested from the park's Scientific Forest Management Area.

      Hmmm... Fishing and some hunting is allowed, except the hunting of moose.

      Dirt roads, no stores, no running water, and no electricity.

      Well, I guess they need the money from user fees, wood products, and hunting to keep it wild. Only thru-hikers are allowed to camp one night without fee. A maximum of 12 says wikipedia.

      Lets see 'cool moist climate' and '100 inches of snow per year'. Well, I would call that cold not cool. But I have rarely lived where it snowed, if at all, less than a foot per year. Most of it, under 4 inches of snow, if it shows up at all.

      Anyway.

      Governor Baxter bought up land using his personal fortune over a 32 year period. No problem there. Other governors in their states do things with their money.

      But if its going to be forever wild, then the hunting and fishing, and cutting down trees, seems to contradict that. Yes, I know many forests are 'managed' by cutting down trees. I disagree with that part.

      Methinks the AT should be moved out of Maine, and completed in Vermont or New Hampshire. The BSP obviously doesn't want hikers there, accomidate them.

      Wiki also points out the park say a 75000 visitor number in 2000 which dropped to 55000 in 2005. Slowly going back up. Well, maybe to preserve the wild, they need to stop everyone from using the park.

      And since it isn't a state park, they should rename it. Baxter's Wild Forever Park.
      Maine generally doesn't want to be part of the US. The top part of the state wants to be Canadian.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Yeah... reminds me of a few hotels I've stayed in while attending science fiction conventions. The hotel staff wanted our money, but they didn't want us there.

      There are some Texans who think that Texas isn't part of the Union. They claim the 1845 joining of the Republic of Texas nation to the US as The Great State of Texas was done incorrectly... The rest of Texas tries to ignore them. I know I do.
      --
      "What do you mean its sunrise already ?!", me.
    • I believe it is called that because it is administered by a guasi government authority of the state of Maine. It was "gifted" to the people of Maine with very strict conditions.
      Possibly it helps the state of Maine feel good at how much of the state looks good on a map without having to make more government land. It is surrounded by logging operations.

      Rasty wrote:

      JimBlue wrote:

      I have done a bit of reading. The trees in the park are harvested from the park's Scientific Forest Management Area.

      Hmmm... Fishing and some hunting is allowed, except the hunting of moose.

      Dirt roads, no stores, no running water, and no electricity.

      Well, I guess they need the money from user fees, wood products, and hunting to keep it wild. Only thru-hikers are allowed to camp one night without fee. A maximum of 12 says wikipedia.

      Lets see 'cool moist climate' and '100 inches of snow per year'. Well, I would call that cold not cool. But I have rarely lived where it snowed, if at all, less than a foot per year. Most of it, under 4 inches of snow, if it shows up at all.

      Anyway.

      Governor Baxter bought up land using his personal fortune over a 32 year period. No problem there. Other governors in their states do things with their money.

      But if its going to be forever wild, then the hunting and fishing, and cutting down trees, seems to contradict that. Yes, I know many forests are 'managed' by cutting down trees. I disagree with that part.

      Methinks the AT should be moved out of Maine, and completed in Vermont or New Hampshire. The BSP obviously doesn't want hikers there, accomidate them.

      Wiki also points out the park say a 75000 visitor number in 2000 which dropped to 55000 in 2005. Slowly going back up. Well, maybe to preserve the wild, they need to stop everyone from using the park.

      And since it isn't a state park, they should rename it. Baxter's Wild Forever Park.
      Maine generally doesn't want to be part of the US. The top part of the state wants to be Canadian.
      Ayup.
      :D
      But seriously, I think they just want to be Maine.
      Resident Australian, proving being a grumpy old man is not just an American trait.
    • I think it all comes down to numbers. They are getting to bigger than some places can asorb. Look at spring at the start. Numbers overweal shelter space & camping around them. But it comes down to a small percentage of bad people. With largerer numbers of people you get an higher amount of mor bad people. When there were only a few someone might overlook a bad hiker as someone uncommon. When hit with it more and more the tollerance goes down. hen we add the hikers that fell they are entitled because they are thru-hikers. I have seen this a lot more recently. The bad rep we get may be from just a few bad hikers, but with Scotts recent media many on social media has said why single him out posting picks of other victory celebrations. I have to point out they were all against the rules. Even Scot admits he was told to keep it out of sight of families & children & then took the bottle at the sign. Tention was already high & he flaunted the rules as far as I'm concerned. Being high profile, I think BSP slamed hard on him for that. I don't think they had a choice if they want to make a stand.

      Maybe it would be better to move the end of the trail. For me I can't imagagine not ending on a majestic peak! & although Mt Washington qualifies Maine puts a hiker back into more wilderness than most of the trail. I don't know a true solution. BSP is their park & I feel like we should play by their rules.
    • This from the Republican-American in Waterbury, CT:
      "Warren Doyle, a Shelton, Conn., native, was the first to seriously commit to hiking the A.T. in the fastest time...66-1/3 days in 1973"
      rep-am.com/articles/2015/07/26/news/morning_5/894575.txt

      So, BSP arrested the first FKTer in the 1970s, then somehow decided to make Scott Jurek a tit-for-tat bookend. The summonses issued to Jurek et al command their bodily presence in court, not a minor invasion of personal freedom. It'll be interesting to see who, among those summoned, mounts a legal defense. If sworn depositions arise from legal challenges by SJ and/or the others, we'll be closer to finding out who (if anyone) put pressure to bear on Donald Jensen Bissell to restrict the personal freedom of SJ, with such a master stroke of negative publicity for the new FKT record holder.
    • to clarify, doyle was not arrested after his supported speed hike. he was arrested several years later on a different trip.

      and the circumstances were different. this was not a questionable summons for spraying champagne on the rocks. he and a friend hiked in the winter without the required permit. there is a reason perimits are required during winter conditions. his friend actually fell and broke his arm. doyle was properly given a summons and had the opportunity to pay the fine. he chose to spend the night in jail rather than pay the fine as some sort of misguided protest.
      2,000 miler
    • Doyle just announced that he has completed the AT for the 17th time. Just thought I'd put it out there. Mainly for Max since he is such a big fan.
      Taken from his Facebook page.

      Warren Doyle
      I am pleased to announce that this morning in a pasture with a spaceship-like structure, and after climbing over an electric fence, I finished my 17th traverse of the entire Appalachian Trail - a section hike that took five years to accomplish.
      Thank you to Iva Hilton; Terry Doyle; Greg McCoy; Lauren Salucci Rexford McCoy; Garrett Fondoules; and especially to Robert Kellner and Jeffrey Hale, for their help, support, and/or encouragement.
      And, a fond appreciation to the Appalachian Trail for allowing me to walk over 36,000 miles of you and the gifts you have unconditionally given to me over the last 43 years.
      Now, onward to Katahdin with the 2015 AT Expedition - all 12 members present and accounted for!
      But first, I'm connecting with my other passion by calling a contradance at the Downtown Amherst Contradance tonight.
      Changes Daily→ ♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫ ♪♫♪♫♪♫ ← Don't blame me. It's That Lonesome Guitar.
    • max.patch wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Has anyone stayed in all ~200 shelters?
      if they did...this woulda been a short day. tumbling run shelter in pa. the sign on the one on the left says "snoring".
      [IMG:http://rohland.homedns.org:8008/AT/at_PAsection14/PA14_1021.JPG]
      That is a nice pair of shelters. While I hated the rocky trail of PA they really do have some outstanding shelters. Maybe they are trying to make up for the trail. I snored at a tent site at this one. :D
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • I remember those two. I also remember the tiny geodesic dome shelter, and another shelter with a floor so worn that sleeping in it would have been uncomfortable.

      Short day? Well you can take the blue blazed trail along the water, rejoin the white blazes higher up, and make a loop. Still a short day, if I remember correctly.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does

      The post was edited 1 time, last by WanderingStovie ().

    • While I usually prefer my tent (unless is it pouring rain), there are a few I enjoyed. In PA 501 and Ecklesville were more like bunk houses (or hostels) than shelters to me. I also enjoyed Overmountain.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • sheepdog wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Has anyone stayed in all ~200 shelters?
      unless it's raining really hard.....shelters suck....it had to be said.....I did like Overmountain though.
      Shelters are real nice when the temperatures are around 0*f. Packing up a tent sucks when it's subzero and the shelters are almost always empty. Plus in those conditions the mice are either keeping a low profile or frozen solid.
      >>>Advertise here! Affordable rates and no long term contracts. Send a PM for more details!<<<
    • SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      sheepdog wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Has anyone stayed in all ~200 shelters?
      unless it's raining really hard.....shelters suck....it had to be said.....I did like Overmountain though.
      Shelters are real nice when the temperatures are around 0*f. Packing up a tent sucks when it's subzero and the shelters are almost always empty. Plus in those conditions the mice are either keeping a low profile or frozen solid.
      Since I do the AT in the summer, most of my Ouachita Trail hiking has been in the winter (or spring). Never seen anyone at a shelter on the OT, so always set up my tent inside, especially when raining or really cold.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General