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Wildlife Sightings Today

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    • Last winter, a hawk took out a red bellied woodpecker that had been coming to my feeder. Silly me tried to scare the hawk away, but the hawk had the woodpecker firmly in his talons and just flew away with him. Next time, I will just snap some pics. Hawks gotta eat too.
    • Tin Man wrote:

      Last winter, a hawk took out a red bellied woodpecker that had been coming to my feeder. Silly me tried to scare the hawk away, but the hawk had the woodpecker firmly in his talons and just flew away with him. Next time, I will just snap some pics. Hawks gotta eat too.
      You must live in a brick house.
      If you lived in a wood one you would have probably been thanking the hawk.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Tin Man wrote:

      Last winter, a hawk took out a red bellied woodpecker that had been coming to my feeder. Silly me tried to scare the hawk away, but the hawk had the woodpecker firmly in his talons and just flew away with him. Next time, I will just snap some pics. Hawks gotta eat too.
      You must live in a brick house.If you lived in a wood one you would have probably been thanking the hawk.
      Some brick, some vinyl. I did dump the suet feeder after the downy woodpecker just moved the feed to the Japanese Maple 12 feet away, turning the tree into swiss cheese.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      The other day a saw a few deer grazing along the side of the Staten Island Expressway.
      Whoever would of thunk it that you'd see deer in New York City!
      Heck I thought it was odd to see an adult male wild turkey in the city limits on top of an Apartment Building. It flew up to get away from me and before I could whip out the cell it was gone.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • Driving down to Cincinnati to see our daughter. Along the highway in IN, a very large red tail hawk takes off from the median, carrying a mouse in his talons. He flew right over the road in front of a sedan driving about 20 yards in front of us. He didn't gain altitude quickly enough an cam within inches of hitting the passanger side windshield. I'm not sure if there was a passanger in the car but if there was, he would have had quite a view.
    • Wise Old Owl wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      The other day a saw a few deer grazing along the side of the Staten Island Expressway.
      Whoever would of thunk it that you'd see deer in New York City!
      Heck I thought it was odd to see an adult male wild turkey in the city limits on top of an Apartment Building. It flew up to get away from me and before I could whip out the cell it was gone.
      Sounds like my luck (or lack of quickness) when I have seen bald eagles when hiking.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      The other day a saw a few deer grazing along the side of the Staten Island Expressway.
      Whoever would of thunk it that you'd see deer in New York City!
      Heck I thought it was odd to see an adult male wild turkey in the city limits on top of an Apartment Building. It flew up to get away from me and before I could whip out the cell it was gone.
      Sounds like my luck (or lack of quickness) when I have seen bald eagles when hiking.
      Yup I agree... Its always a shocker... worthy of pulling over.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • While driving to the trailhead yesterday morning, I saw dozens of groups of geese in the sky, flying in formation. I must have been directly in their flight path. Initially, I saw three groups and thought that was cool then kept seeing them all over the sky. I’ve never seen so many groups at one time. I quickly counted 40 geese in one group (and didn’t get them all) before they passed overhead and I had to pay attention to my driving. The road was surrounded by farm land and there were at least 100 in a field. The weird thing is that they were flying north.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      bad doggie!
    • Jake Ace wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      bad doggie!
      I like dogs, it was just unexpected and startling. I’m sure they lived close by, there was a lot of private property in this area.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      While driving to the trailhead yesterday morning, I saw dozens of groups of geese in the sky, flying in formation. I must have been directly in their flight path. Initially, I saw three groups and thought that was cool then kept seeing them all over the sky. I’ve never seen so many groups at one time. I quickly counted 40 geese in one group (and didn’t get them all) before they passed overhead and I had to pay attention to my driving. The road was surrounded by farm land and there were at least 100 in a field. The weird thing is that they were flying north.
      That's because it's warmer in Canada than here over the next few days.
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      I think that your concern about dogs is legitimate. In 2017 in the US there were 13 fatal dog attacks, 12 of them were by Pitbulls. Compare that with 2 fatal bear attacks, both grizzlies in Alaska.

      I'm not sure a whistle would help in a dog attack situation. I would go with some of the lightweight pepper sprays for runners that that are available that should serve to deter both 2 and 4 legged predators.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      Jake Ace wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      bad doggie!
      I like dogs, it was just unexpected and startling. I’m sure they lived close by, there was a lot of private property in this area.
      yup, that would’ve put me on guard as well.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      While driving to the trailhead yesterday morning, I saw dozens of groups of geese in the sky, flying in formation. I must have been directly in their flight path. Initially, I saw three groups and thought that was cool then kept seeing them all over the sky. I’ve never seen so many groups at one time. I quickly counted 40 geese in one group (and didn’t get them all) before they passed overhead and I had to pay attention to my driving. The road was surrounded by farm land and there were at least 100 in a field. The weird thing is that they were flying north.
      That's because it's warmer in Canada than here over the next few days.
      My thought as I experience a dwindling snowpack due to daylight temps in the high forties. Meanwhile you folks along the Eastern Seaboatd recover from blizzard like conditions.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      I think that your concern about dogs is legitimate. In 2017 in the US there were 13 fatal dog attacks, 12 of them were by Pitbulls. Compare that with 2 fatal bear attacks, both grizzlies in Alaska.
      I'm not sure a whistle would help in a dog attack situation. I would go with some of the lightweight pepper sprays for runners that that are available that should serve to deter both 2 and 4 legged predators.
      Wrap a jacket/sweater/whatever is handy around your forearm, let them bit into it, grab them by their belly and smash their back as hard as you can over a rock/log/whatever is handy.
    • Tin Man wrote:

      IMScotty wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      I think that your concern about dogs is legitimate. In 2017 in the US there were 13 fatal dog attacks, 12 of them were by Pitbulls. Compare that with 2 fatal bear attacks, both grizzlies in Alaska.I'm not sure a whistle would help in a dog attack situation. I would go with some of the lightweight pepper sprays for runners that that are available that should serve to deter both 2 and 4 legged predators.
      Wrap a jacket/sweater/whatever is handy around your forearm, let them bit into it, grab them by their belly and smash their back as hard as you can over a rock/log/whatever is handy.
      this applies I guess only for two dogs locked in a throated death grip...but a girl I know who use to work at a vet said the only way to separate them is to stick a finger in their butt. I say...let em fight. :D
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      Dog story
      Kathy and I spent a night on Killington, in Vermont.
      As we hiked southbound, down off the mountain, we came upon a young woman thru hiking with 2 dogs.
      They weren't her dogs, but had been following her for some miles, since The Secret Shelter that's in Vt.
      We called the dogs and played with them for a while while the thru hiked away.
      Then the dogs followed us back to the Secret Shelter, where we took a break.
      I took the dogs to the first house I saw and the home owner was pissed when I asked him to take the dogs.
      It seems the dogs belonged to a woman up the road who thought it would be cruel to leash or fence the dogs in and this far from the first time he had to deal with them.
      He did take them but very begrudgingly.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      I was around mile two of my hike yesterday and was running when I heard a crashing sound in the shrubs to my left, less than 10 yards away, and spied two brown animals out of the corner of my eye. My first thought was bears but it was two large, well-fed Rottweiler’s with collars.

      I stopped running and turned towards them. Within a span of three seconds, I thought, “They are bears...oh no, they are Rottweiler’s! damn, I wish they were bears, I know what to do around bears. I have no idea what to do around attacking dogs.

      I thought about what I had to defend myself and only came up with a piercing titanium whistle that was around my neck under my chest strap and three layers of clothes and my hiking poles. I didn’t know if I should appear threatening and yell and shake my poles or try to appear non-threatening (?) so just stood there.

      One of them barked at me for a minute before they headed off. It was a long minute.
      Dog storyKathy and I spent a night on Killington, in Vermont.
      As we hiked southbound, down off the mountain, we came upon a young woman thru hiking with 2 dogs.
      They weren't her dogs, but had been following her for some miles, since The Secret Shelter that's in Vt.
      We called the dogs and played with them for a while while the thru hiked away.
      Then the dogs followed us back to the Secret Shelter, where we took a break.
      I took the dogs to the first house I saw and the home owner was pissed when I asked him to take the dogs.
      It seems the dogs belonged to a woman up the road who thought it would be cruel to leash or fence the dogs in and this far from the first time he had to deal with them.
      He did take them but very begrudgingly.
      I think you are lucky he was willing to deal with them. Most people would not have.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Spotted this Whistle Pig drinking my party swill in October... He's out of here!
      That's a term that I've never heard outside the Poconos! By the time you get to the Delaware, it's already a 'chuck.'
      I finally heard a really good explanation today as to why they got that name from some locals below the Mason Dixon line. IF you whistle really loud they would stand up so you could shoot and cook them. The last remaining restaurant in Delaware was featured on "Restaurant Impossible" and that was one of the more popular items on the menu. Chef Robert Irvine almost crapped his pants when he found out what it really was. The place closed a year later.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!