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Dogs on the AT

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    • Dogs on the AT

      What's your opinion of dogs on the trail? Anyone ever hike long distance with your pup? I'm currently reading "The Things You Find on the Appalachian Trail" by Ken Runolfson about a hiker who took his dog along with him. amazon.com/The-Things-Find-Appalachian-Trail/dp/0786447672

      I've been leaning toward no for the inconveniences dogs would bring along with them on the trail, but the company of my yellow lab sure would be comforting.
      www.appalachiantrailclarity.com - Life on the A.T.

      Sometimes you find yourself in the middle of nowhere, and sometimes in the middle of nowhere, you find yourself.
    • I have never had a serious problem with other people's dogs on the trail, but I have to watch my step sometimes.

      Well OK, there was a hunting dog that scent marked my CCF pad, but I wiped that off. I did not realize it until I was ready to lay down on it.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • Drybones wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      I have never had a serious problem with other people's dogs on the trail, but I have to watch my step sometimes.

      Well OK, there was a hunting dog that scent marked my CCF pad, but I wiped that off. I did not realize it until I was ready to lay down on it.


      That dog now owns you.


      Not if you mark him back..
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    • twistwrist wrote:

      What's your opinion of dogs on the trail? Anyone ever hike long distance with your pup? I'm currently reading "The Things You Find on the Appalachian Trail" by Ken Runolfson about a hiker who took his dog along with him. amazon.com/The-Things-Find-Appalachian-Trail/dp/0786447672

      I've been leaning toward no for the inconveniences dogs would bring along with them on the trail, but the company of my yellow lab sure would be comforting.



      Lots of things to consider Rugby loves section hiking but at 80 pounds there are cliffs you have to hike him up and down or find a way around. Some dogs are "acclimated" and that's OK Some breeds can do the AT others cant. Its a lot of responsibility and requires tons of patience. You will discover you will need to carry dog water and food - not everything ends up in a dog pack.

      This has 28 reviews and is $3 on Kindle I will see if I can get a better resource
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • Drybones wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I would love to have a hiking dog. I have a new grand dog that would be perfect but I don't want to be the one to train him.


      Get a Rhodesian ridgeback...can outlast any hiker and if you train him properly and you can leave the 44 magnum at home.
      Interestingly I've heard from a number of ridgeback owners that they don't make the best trail dogs. They can turn out to be "princesses" as one of them put it, and are often a pain in the ass to get them to do anything they don't want to. If there are any ridgeback owners on this page I'd love to hear whether or not they agree with this.
      >>>Advertise here! Affordable rates and no long term contracts. Send a PM for more details!<<<
    • I do not own a dog, because I am single, live alone and I am not always home, and I do not think that would be fair to a dog. Because of this I do not see myself hiking with a dog either.

      But if someone wants to hike with their dog, who am I or anyone else to say otherwise -- notwithstanding park rules, good etiquette, etc., and etc. I like dogs and have enjoyed seeing other folks with their dogs and the bond that they share. On everyone of my hikes I have encountered someone out with their dog and sometimes they were off their leash and sometimes not the most perfectly behaved animal, but I personally enjoyed the moment when a dog makes it clear that he wants you to pet him.

      In the end dogs on the trail is just not something I can get myself worked up on and get my panties bunched. It humors me the moment that dogs are mentioned on other sites that the same passive aggresive chickensh%ts who would never say anything in person, come out of the woodwork bitching and moaning and lecturing about how they expect everyone else and their dog to behave, regardless of the subject ofmthe original post.

      As for me... meh... enjoy your time with your buddy (yeah I am a little jealous).
      Of course I talk to myself... sometimes I need expert advice.
    • For me it's pretty much the same as with dogs anywhere in public. If the dog is well trained/behaved, rock on. If not, the OWNER is the problem and needs to correct his or herself by removing the dog from the public environment, whatever it may be. **Note: I have only encountered ONE dog in my very limited time spent on the trail, and that was in passing. But I really don't see my opinion changing. A good, well behaved dog is a welcome addition to many situations. A poorly trained/behaved dog, not so much.

      As for actually TAKING a dog hiking, that is up to the dog and owner, not me.
      Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more, you should never wish to do less. - Robert E. Lee
    • most of the dog owner thru hikers i met on the trail had their dogs under control most all the time.last year bluegrass hiked with his pitbull, bella , who seemed to love the trail, was well behaved, and even when i saw her again in maine, always looked like she was having the time of her life.i dont remember meeting a dog with a thru that was out of line, and it seems to me the owners know to be extra attentive to the dogs needs and health.
      i have had some uncomfortable experiences with off leash dogs in harriman on day hikes,from time to time, though.
      "oh he's friendly" seems to be a good excuse for a strange dog running at you.
      its all good
    • Tuckahoe wrote:

      I do not own a dog, because I am single, live alone and I am not always home, and I do not think that would be fair to a dog. Because of this I do not see myself hiking with a dog either.

      But if someone wants to hike with their dog, who am I or anyone else to say otherwise -- notwithstanding park rules, good etiquette, etc., and etc. I like dogs and have enjoyed seeing other folks with their dogs and the bond that they share. On everyone of my hikes I have encountered someone out with their dog and sometimes they were off their leash and sometimes not the most perfectly behaved animal, but I personally enjoyed the moment when a dog makes it clear that he wants you to pet him.

      In the end dogs on the trail is just not something I can get myself worked up on and get my panties bunched. It humors me the moment that dogs are mentioned on other sites that the same passive aggresive chickensh%ts who would never say anything in person, come out of the woodwork bitching and moaning and lecturing about how they expect everyone else and their dog to behave, regardless of the subject ofmthe original post.

      As for me... meh... enjoy your time with your buddy (yeah I am a little jealous).


      I have been bitten more than once. I have also seen a child attacked quite severely. I have absolutely no problem explaining to hikers that they are terrorizing me and the possible results from doing so. Your statement seems somewhat passive aggressive in itself. There are reasons why dogs are not allowed in many places.
    • My wife and I have a large dog, a 90 pound shepherd and she loves being outdoors and hiking.
      We have hiked for up to a week with our previous shepherd and it's a lot of extra work.
      There's dog food, a ground pad, and sometimes even an extra sleeping bag to carry.
      Also, she stays on leash at all times except when in our tent.
      She'd chase anything if we let her (well, except the moose in New England) so we have to be careful she doesn't pull us over.
      But it's not all work, we do enjoy having her along.
      She loves people but is terrified of dogs so she gets aggressive toward them, so naturally we have to take extra care when there are other dogs around. As much as she likes people, we take extra care when near others because we know that not everyone likes dogs.
      Our dog is the only one I know that has it's own hiking gear, pack, ground pad, a fleece coat, a quilted coat, a rain coat, a harness, booties, light weight bowl and who knows what else.
      That all I can think of for now.
    • hikerboy wrote:

      most of the dog owner thru hikers i met on the trail had their dogs under control most all the time.last year bluegrass hiked with his pitbull, bella , who seemed to love the trail, was well behaved, and even when i saw her again in maine, always looked like she was having the time of her life.i dont remember meeting a dog with a thru that was out of line, and it seems to me the owners know to be extra attentive to the dogs needs and health.
      i have had some uncomfortable experiences with off leash dogs in harriman on day hikes,from time to time, though.
      "oh he's friendly" seems to be a good excuse for a strange dog running at you.


      Blue Jay La Fey wrote:

      Tuckahoe wrote:

      I do not own a dog, because I am single, live alone and I am not always home, and I do not think that would be fair to a dog. Because of this I do not see myself hiking with a dog either.

      But if someone wants to hike with their dog, who am I or anyone else to say otherwise -- notwithstanding park rules, good etiquette, etc., and etc. I like dogs and have enjoyed seeing other folks with their dogs and the bond that they share. On everyone of my hikes I have encountered someone out with their dog and sometimes they were off their leash and sometimes not the most perfectly behaved animal, but I personally enjoyed the moment when a dog makes it clear that he wants you to pet him.

      In the end dogs on the trail is just not something I can get myself worked up on and get my panties bunched. It humors me the moment that dogs are mentioned on other sites that the same passive aggresive chickensh%ts who would never say anything in person, come out of the woodwork bitching and moaning and lecturing about how they expect everyone else and their dog to behave, regardless of the subject ofmthe original post.

      As for me... meh... enjoy your time with your buddy (yeah I am a little jealous).


      I have been bitten more than once. I have also seen a child attacked quite severely. I have absolutely no problem explaining to hikers that they are terrorizing me and the possible results from doing so. Your statement seems somewhat passive aggressive in itself. There are reasons why dogs are not allowed in many places.


      Key words here are off leash. I've hiked with friends and their dog and it truly is a well behaved dog that they let off the leash when there in no one around. The first sign of anybody and the dog is immediately put on the leash. As the other hikers approach they move her off trail and let them pass. If the other hikers want to stop and pet her they are more than welcomed. If not they just nod and pass by. He said he does this with her because not all people like dogs or have had bad experiences with them. People have stopped and petted her and others have just gone by and said thank you.
      Changes Daily→ ♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫ ♪♫♪♫♪♫ ← Don't blame me. It's That Lonesome Guitar.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      My wife and I have a large dog, a 90 pound shepherd and she loves being outdoors and hiking.
      We have hiked for up to a week with our previous shepherd and it's a lot of extra work.
      There's dog food, a ground pad, and sometimes even an extra sleeping bag to carry.
      Also, she stays on leash at all times except when in our tent.
      She'd chase anything if we let her (well, except the moose in New England) so we have to be careful she doesn't pull us over.
      But it's not all work, we do enjoy having her along.
      She loves people but is terrified of dogs so she gets aggressive toward them, so naturally we have to take extra care when there are other dogs around. As much as she likes people, we take extra care when near others because we know that not everyone likes dogs.
      Our dog is the only one I know that has it's own hiking gear, pack, ground pad, a fleece coat, a quilted coat, a rain coat, a harness, booties, light weight bowl and who knows what else.
      That all I can think of for now.


      Tora's a great dog!
      I'm not lost. I know where I am. I'm right here.
    • Even when you have the best behaved dog.. folks get weird... without the dog pack, I have heard my 80 pound dog called a "nice puppy" and a "black bear" on the trail. With the pack on he is "wonderful" even if the pack is empty and he is behaving badly, (running up to you and licking you too much.)

      Hey Rasty please move this when you get a chance to the doggie folder
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Wise Old Owl ().

    • Blue Jay La Fey wrote:

      Tuckahoe wrote:

      I do not own a dog, because I am single, live alone and I am not always home, and I do not think that would be fair to a dog. Because of this I do not see myself hiking with a dog either.

      But if someone wants to hike with their dog, who am I or anyone else to say otherwise -- notwithstanding park rules, good etiquette, etc., and etc. I like dogs and have enjoyed seeing other folks with their dogs and the bond that they share. On everyone of my hikes I have encountered someone out with their dog and sometimes they were off their leash and sometimes not the most perfectly behaved animal, but I personally enjoyed the moment when a dog makes it clear that he wants you to pet him.

      In the end dogs on the trail is just not something I can get myself worked up on and get my panties bunched. It humors me the moment that dogs are mentioned on other sites that the same passive aggresive chickensh%ts who would never say anything in person, come out of the woodwork bitching and moaning and lecturing about how they expect everyone else and their dog to behave, regardless of the subject ofmthe original post.

      As for me... meh... enjoy your time with your buddy (yeah I am a little jealous).


      I have been bitten more than once. I have also seen a child attacked quite severely. I have absolutely no problem explaining to hikers that they are terrorizing me and the possible results from doing so. Your statement seems somewhat passive aggressive in itself. There are reasons why dogs are not allowed in many places.


      Not passive agressive, just that I live my life by the much clichéd principal that I am not usually bothered by the acts of others if one does not infringe on my life, liberty and property. Or better yet, I do not go out to seek offense and it is not society's responsibility to remedy all of my offenses.

      Never mind that I clearly stated otherwise, you seem to have interpreted my statment as a tolerance of those with blatant disregard for laws or have vicious dogs. Rather my point is that I dont get my panties in a bunch and just dont sweat the small stuff, nor do I feel the need to be that guy that lectures everyone with a dog, whether on a trail or a forum.
      Of course I talk to myself... sometimes I need expert advice.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Tuckahoe ().

    • If a dog puts its teeth on your body but does not break the skin, is it a dog bite? I encountered a lady with a large black dog near Hampton. She was having trouble attaching the leash to the collar. I tried to help by grabbing the collar, but the dog grabbed me by the forearm. I did not struggle. The dog let me go. I kept my distance after that.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • Grinder wrote:

      For me it's pretty much the same as with dogs anywhere in public. If the dog is well trained/behaved, rock on. If not, the OWNER is the problem and needs to correct his or herself by removing the dog from the public environment, whatever it may be. **Note: I have only encountered ONE dog in my very limited time spent on the trail, and that was in passing. But I really don't see my opinion changing. A good, well behaved dog is a welcome addition to many situations. A poorly trained/behaved dog, not so much.

      As for actually TAKING a dog hiking, that is up to the dog and owner, not me.


      Ditto

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • I had to put down a 16 year old Black Lab that I had rescued from a pound...just hours prior to her scheduled euthanasia. She hiked and canoed with me for years. Her physical issues appeared just prior to my starting a TH necessitating cancellation. Though I was not intending for her to accompany me on the AT, I did not have someone capable of attending to her medical needs. When she hiked with me, she was always on lead not that she was not trustworthy but we were frequently in bear country and I feel it's a courtesy to other hikers.

      Interesting I came across this thread this evening. I was X-country skiing for most of the day and encountered several ill-mannered dog owners. Off-lead dogs running amok and littering the trail with waste is a major irritant whilst skiing.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Rasty wrote:

      The neusiok trail has a bunch of swamp bridges. There was dog crap on the bridges in many places.


      Dog crap or carnivore crap? As long as I'm away from a trailhead, most of the dog like turds I see on the trail are coyote. Many wild carnivores like to crap on prominent objects like rocks or bridges to mark territory, dogs are far less likely to do so.
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    • SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      The neusiok trail has a bunch of swamp bridges. There was dog crap on the bridges in many places.


      Dog crap or carnivore crap? As long as I'm away from a trailhead, most of the dog like turds I see on the trail are coyote. Many wild carnivores like to crap on prominent objects like rocks or bridges to mark territory, dogs are far less likely to do so.


      Don't know but it was fairly large.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • At one point on the Camino I encountered an enormous pile of human turd right in the middle of the trail.
      I can live with dog turds on the trail.
      Here on the Bib you often get emu crap. A lot like a scouring cow if you're wondering.
      :(
      Resident Australian, proving being a grumpy old man is not just an American trait.
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      My wife and I have a large dog, a 90 pound shepherd and she loves being outdoors and hiking.
      We have hiked for up to a week with our previous shepherd and it's a lot of extra work.
      There's dog food, a ground pad, and sometimes even an extra sleeping bag to carry.
      Also, she stays on leash at all times except when in our tent.
      She'd chase anything if we let her (well, except the moose in New England) so we have to be careful she doesn't pull us over.
      But it's not all work, we do enjoy having her along.
      She loves people but is terrified of dogs so she gets aggressive toward them, so naturally we have to take extra care when there are other dogs around. As much as she likes people, we take extra care when near others because we know that not everyone likes dogs.
      Our dog is the only one I know that has it's own hiking gear, pack, ground pad, a fleece coat, a quilted coat, a rain coat, a harness, booties, light weight bowl and who knows what else.
      That all I can think of for now.


      Tora's a great dog!


      I'll tell her you said that, it'll make her morning.
      I'll even give her a pat on the back for you.
      Unfortunately she won't be able to come to the MLK weekend event this year. :(
    • My dogs love popcorn, it's the only people food they're allowed. Casper is blind so if I throw him popcorn, it hits him in the nose and then Molly steals it. So I put Casper on the bed and make him lay down and I throw the popcorn between his paws. He feels it and gets his treat.

      What's funny is they know when I'm down to just kernels. I don't have to say anything, they just know. Molly runs off and Casper finds a comfy spot and goes to sleep.

      My cat loved popcorn too but I didn't throw it at him. Sometimes he'd try to take it right from the bowl.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis