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The Cumberland Trail

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    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      What are you using to measure mileage?
      My Suunto GPS watch.
      Apparently, several people in this particular group used Gaia. Ive been trying to figure out why the difference in mileage. I wondered if a change in time zone affects gps tracks (i dont think it does) so did some googling and found this... granted, its two years old. Maybe you smart people can explain this to me.outdoors.stackexchange.com/que…-inaccurate-for-distances
      Can you picture me with an antenna on top of my head while hiking? Bet that would generate a few interesting trail names.
      This is how Google Maps gets its trail images.
    • odd man out wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      What are you using to measure mileage?
      My Suunto GPS watch.
      Apparently, several people in this particular group used Gaia. Ive been trying to figure out why the difference in mileage. I wondered if a change in time zone affects gps tracks (i dont think it does) so did some googling and found this... granted, its two years old. Maybe you smart people can explain this to me.outdoors.stackexchange.com/que…-inaccurate-for-distances
      Can you picture me with an antenna on top of my head while hiking? Bet that would generate a few interesting trail names.
      This is how Google Maps gets its trail images.
      Now that would be an interesting job. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Thinking about going back to eagle bluff to search for my glasses but not sure it’s worth it as I bought a new pair yesterday.

      Really need to go hiking, it’s been a rough weekend. Weather doesn’t look good on my days off though.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      Thinking about going back to eagle bluff to search for my glasses but not sure it’s worth it as I bought a new pair yesterday.

      Really need to go hiking, it’s been a rough weekend. Weather doesn’t look good on my days off though.
      Hope you have good hiking weather and find your glasses too. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      Thinking about going back to eagle bluff to search for my glasses but not sure it’s worth it as I bought a new pair yesterday.

      Really need to go hiking, it’s been a rough weekend. Weather doesn’t look good on my days off though.
      Hope you have good hiking weather and find your glasses too. :)
      The ‘coons probably stole my glasses.

      Big South Fork sounds fun. :)
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      Thinking about going back to eagle bluff to search for my glasses but not sure it’s worth it as I bought a new pair yesterday.

      Really need to go hiking, it’s been a rough weekend. Weather doesn’t look good on my days off though.
      Hope you have good hiking weather and find your glasses too. :)
      The ‘coons probably stole my glasses.
      Big South Fork sounds fun. :)
      Should be, look forward to seeing pictures.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I stopped by the Obed Visitor Center this afternoon and they categorically state that the CT segment through Obed is 14.1 miles.

      And they gave me the phone number of a kayak shuttler. Hmmmm... interesting possibilities. :)
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Hiked the incomplete McGill Creek section this morning. 2.4 mi in, then again back out. There's no map of it at the CT's .org website, but once you find the start of the trail through the overgrowth, it's well-blazed, and despite probably not getting much traffic, only a little of it is starting to get overgrown.

      I set 2 personal bests - average hiking speed just over 3 mph (based on the unofficial distance), and "most spider webs walked into." Yes, I flipped my poles in front of me regularly, but they don't get everything, and if you take a little break from that effort, yet keep walking, you'll be punished for it!

      Couple things worth noting. The McGill parking is just a turnoff area from a main road. IMO it's better to park at Graysville Mtn and walk to the TH. Also, there is a TH near McGill parking, but it just leads you back to Graysville Mtn TH parking. The actual McGill TH is on the other side of the bridge, barely visible through some overgrowth. And contrary to what the CT's .org website says, it did not appear to have a kiosk.

      This section is pretty well marked, and the trail is usually clear, and sometimes ATV-wide. Some overgrowth and blowdowns are starting to accumulate.
    • Another day, another CT segment ... or part of one, anyway.
      Parking for the partially-completed McGill section (pix above) is just a pull-off on a busy (for a rural area) road. Alternatively, one can park at nearby Graysville Mtn section and walk the 0.2 mi or so to the McGill trailhead. That's what I did.

      Today, I met up with Traffic Jam and we hiked part of the Graysville Section, from the southern trailhead (Roaring Creek - more like whimpering trickle) to Gilbreath Creek, 4.9 mi ... and then back. Water levels quite low all around. Most creeks were flowing, at some point, but much of their area was nearly still water.

      I had previously been as far as Cranmore Cove Overlook (3.0 mi) in late January one year. Today was rather warm, and that overlook faces east, so it was pretty toasty at that overlook all day. The elevation gain is said to be 900 feet, largely in an 0.8-mi stretch, but it didn't seem nearly that steep (that's a 21% grade). Perhaps there is more elevation gain beyond the point we hiked, and that figures in to the 900 ft.

      There were 3 really large blowdowns just before we got to Gilbreath Creek, and we nearly turned back, but were so close, we soldiered on. At Gilbreath Creek, I saw a large 95%-dead tree which will soon be the next big blowdown. It is poised to fall on a very nice lunchspot. Glad we won't be there when it happens.

      I drank 3L of water ... of which 1/2 was Gatorade. Yesterday I used DEET; today, picaridin. Both worked equally well. Carried a 22L daypack (REI's Stuff Travel Daypack). When I'm sweating that much, it's nice to not have a waistbelt. Glad it could handle the water weight (high of 90F, with a 10 mile hike and crappy water sources ... I actually carried nearly 4L).

      BTW, in the 8th photo, there are boulders trapped in those tree roots! Sorry there's nothing there for scale. This stuff was big!

    • Soak Creek Section

      Yesterday, the CTC and others held a celebration event commemorating the opening of a new section, Soak Creek, near Spring City, TN. The nearest adjacent sections are Stinging Fork Falls and Piney Creek. One odd thing about the ribbon-cutting and "grand opening" is that ... the section is not complete yet! Granted, tremendous work and progress has been done, but the simple fact is, the section is not complete.

      There was also confusion about how long the hike would be on this day ... 5 miles, then 2, then 7? Which end to start from? Depends on who you asked, when, and what people felt like doing in the moment. Soak Creek was flowing hard - maybe that affected things. We ended up going to the Stinging Fork Falls trailhead and starting there. After hiking down to the creek (about a mile), you turn left for Stinging Fork Falls, but can turn right and hike along (and above) the creek for about 2.5 miles of new trail, at which point you reach where the trail work crews are now. So it can be about a 7 mile in-out hike from Stinging Fork trailhead. Note, there will be some re-routing from the trailhead as well, so this just reflects where the trail is now. It's kind of confusing:

      cumberlandtrail.org/maps-and-g…l-segments/stinging-fork/

      The other end of the Soak Creek trail, by Piney TH, I have hiked some as well, a couple years ago. I'm not sure why we didn't start there, except maybe the creek was overflowing and flooding the trall.

      In any case, 7 miles makes a nice dayhike and I heartily recommend this area, esp. after some significant rainfall. The rushing water really adds to the ambience.