Welcome to the AppalachianTrailCafe.net!
Take a moment and register and then join the conversation

Other Hobby, Kayaking Questions

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • Other Hobby, Kayaking Questions

      This year we bought two recreational kayaks from dicks sporting goods. We had a lot of fun this year with them. We've taken them to Wautaga Lake a few times and even loaded them down with gear for overnighters. weve taken them to Myrtle and paddled some backwater and paddled the inlet to Waites Island from Cherry Grove. We also went down the lower Nolichucky which was a lot of fun. But our kayaks sure weren't made for that kind of water. My wife spent more time out of the kayak tHan in. But we had a blast!

      Next spring we would like to do Fontana Lake to Hazel Creek and from there hike up to the AT. We are also looking at lake Jocassee with all the waterfalls.

      But, ... We need different boats and we need suggestions. I think what we need is a crossover boat. I've been looking at liquid logics remix. We need space for camping gear. We need to be able to do class 2+. I'd also like to be able to take it off shore when at the beach or play in the surf when it is low. Plus well also be doing lakes.

      Is a crossover boat what we need? We can't afford to buy for each situation since we have to buy two boats.
      Is there any others we should look at?
    • Dmax wrote:

      This year we bought two recreational kayaks from dicks sporting goods. We had a lot of fun this year with them. We've taken them to Wautaga Lake a few times and even loaded them down with gear for overnighters. weve taken them to Myrtle and paddled some backwater and paddled the inlet to Waites Island from Cherry Grove. We also went down the lower Nolichucky which was a lot of fun. But our kayaks sure weren't made for that kind of water. My wife spent more time out of the kayak tHan in. But we had a blast!

      Next spring we would like to do Fontana Lake to Hazel Creek and from there hike up to the AT. We are also looking at lake Jocassee with all the waterfalls.

      But, ... We need different boats and we need suggestions. I think what we need is a crossover boat. I've been looking at liquid logics remix. We need space for camping gear. We need to be able to do class 2+. I'd also like to be able to take it off shore when at the beach or play in the surf when it is low. Plus well also be doing lakes.

      Is a crossover boat what we need? We can't afford to buy for each situation since we have to buy two boats.
      Is there any others we should look at?


      I used my Liquid Logic Tryon for both Hazel and Eagle Creek... Its the perfect blend of not a play boat, but not a Touring boat either... I even used it at the Olympic Kayak course when I lived in Georgia... It tracks well enough that I have also used it to paddle across Lake Toho and Lake Kissimmee in Florida... I'll see if I can find some Pics...
      1 Fish, 2 Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish...
    • The Liquid Logic remix xp10 is going to be better in the lake then the xp9 which will be better on the river. The Liquid Logic remix series is almost the perfect class 2 to 3 boat. I already have a Perception Dancer and a Riot Boogie for surfing and if I was getting another boat it would be the remix xp9.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • twistwrist wrote:

      Toli, where did you live in Ga?

      I don't know much about kayaks as I usually rent mine, but I LOVE kayaking! I'm considering some aqua hiking when I get to NOC.
      Dmax, sounds like you and your wife have a blast!


      Outside of Dahlonega... I lived on Dicks Creek, in the Chattahoochee NF... I could walk to Neel Gap...
      1 Fish, 2 Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish...
    • Just noticed you want to play in the surf. The semi displacement hull on the remix will actually surf better then most planing hull whitewater boats. Planing hull boats need fins in order to surf because the flat bottom won't bit into the side of a wave and the boat just spins. Recreational kayaks like you find at Dicks won't surf either because of the heavy v shaped bottom.

      My Perception Dancer is a displacement hull which at 11' powers through the waves and surfs really well. I use this boat when the surf gets big and hollow.

      My Riot Boogie is better at tricks and medium sized waves and rolling waves. This boat has three 4" find directly under my seat.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • I agree with Rasty high whitewater requires short and stubby kayaks that suck in lakes. Most Dicks sporting goods are too short for lakes,they require 2x the amount of physical energy to paddle. Surfing requires topside Kayaks and Deep sea are super long. In Maine I have nothing shorter than 15 feet, I have whales breaking water beside me,it requires stability! The longer kayaks require far less energy to paddle when I am 6 miles out. Rivers and lakes require 13 feet for tracking.

      Hense this little gem
      [IMG:http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg275/MarkSwarbrick/DSCN1061_zpsa45c8d54.jpg]
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • twistwrist wrote:


      Dmax, sounds like you and your wife have a blast!


      I've always been an outdoors person. My wife not so much. Then our lives changed two years ago and we look at life a lot differently now. Especially her. She finds a lot of peace when out in nature. I always new it was there. .. This year we outfiited her with backpacking gear and kayaking stuff. During the summer there were times we went camping every weekend. . It helps us to be out together to work through our loss. And we spent a lot of time doing that this year. .. Here's to the next!!!!
    • just thinking out loud here; have you considered using a 2 man canoe for camping and then getting the kind of kayaks that are best in whitewater without having to compromise?

      whitewater kayaking was my primary hobby for a couple years until i realized that the nantahala was going to be the limit of my capabilites.

      we used to canoe thru the okefenokie swamp every winter for about 5 years in a row. you can take a boatload :) of gear in a 2 man canoe.
      2,000 miler
    • I tried to do that a few years back. I never could get her into the canoe. I got tired of going out by myself and paddling that thing so I sold it. .. For whitewater I could always pick up a used boat off of WNC gear swap. It seems most of the people on there are from asheville. That's not too far to drive for a cheap used boat.
    • max.patch wrote:

      just thinking out loud here; have you considered using a 2 man canoe for camping and then getting the kind of kayaks that are best in whitewater without having to compromise?

      whitewater kayaking was my primary hobby for a couple years until i realized that the nantahala was going to be the limit of my capabilites.

      we used to canoe thru the okefenokie swamp every winter for about 5 years in a row. you can take a boatload :) of gear in a 2 man canoe.


      The Remix 9 and 10 liquidlogickayaks.com/product/LRRX1015.html are an amazing boat. This boat combines the easy of paddling of old school whitewater boats like the Perception Dancer and a recreational boat. This boat in the right hands can handle class 4 whitewater.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • max.patch wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      liquidlogickayaks.com/product/LRSX1215.html

      This is also a game changer. This boat would be even better as a lake / down river boat.


      the equipment has come a long way since my days of paddling a dancer and mirage.


      My dancer is my go to boat for big hollow waves. There is nothing like getting fully barreled in a boat.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • I have only paddled a sit on top and usually end up in the water when trying to get on. How stable is a kayak like the XP10 compared to a sit on top? How easy is it to get out of if you tip over?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • WiseOldOwl wrote:

      Craigs list hands down best site look for ones that include paddles and moving gear and make sure you have a good roof rack


      I was was looking at the j racks the other day. For trips around home we've put them in the back of the truck. When going to the beach I strapped them down to a homemade box trailer. I love the trailer. I can put a full cooler, all my paddling gear, and all my fishing gear in it. The wife doesn't like it at all. She says we look like the Beverly hillbillies going to the beach.
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      I have only paddled a sit on top and usually end up in the water when trying to get on. How stable is a kayak like the XP10 compared to a sit on top? How easy is it to get out of if you tip over?


      Sit in kayaks are less initially stable then sit on tops until things get rough then sit in kayaks become part of you. Your thoughts become the boats actions with the smallest motion. Getting in and out is more demanding but the performance is worth the effort.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Dmax wrote:

      WiseOldOwl wrote:

      Craigs list hands down best site look for ones that include paddles and moving gear and make sure you have a good roof rack


      I was was looking at the j racks the other day. For trips around home we've put them in the back of the truck. When going to the beach I strapped them down to a homemade box trailer. I love the trailer. I can put a full cooler, all my paddling gear, and all my fishing gear in it. The wife doesn't like it at all. She says we look like the Beverly hillbillies going to the beach.
      [IMG:http://www.kayakfishingmagazine.net/images/20131012_065453.jpg]
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I have only paddled a sit on top and usually end up in the water when trying to get on. How stable is a kayak like the XP10 compared to a sit on top? How easy is it to get out of if you tip over?


      Sit in kayaks are less initially stable then sit on tops until things get rough then sit in kayaks become part of you. Your thoughts become the boats actions with the smallest motion. Getting in and out is more demanding but the performance is worth the effort.

      Uh what? C1's are sit ins were not stable. C1's require talent to paddle... Sit in Kayaks are awesome and are not "trapping people under water." The older versions had two wood boards to help you lock in with your knee's and should you flip and we did the whole idea was to keep you in if you wanted to give you the opportunity to push back up again. If you sucked - you relaxed your knees and fell out. Not possible with today's equipment - you flip you fall out- period.

      FYI Remix - I took a look and its great it has a rudder but ten feet at 150 pounds of body weight is OK if you are 200 pounds this is NOT a kayak for you. Displacement is very important, lake and wind has a huge affect on your experiences - minimum for lake is 13 feet IMO.
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • WiseOldOwl wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I have only paddled a sit on top and usually end up in the water when trying to get on. How stable is a kayak like the XP10 compared to a sit on top? How easy is it to get out of if you tip over?


      Sit in kayaks are less initially stable then sit on tops until things get rough then sit in kayaks become part of you. Your thoughts become the boats actions with the smallest motion. Getting in and out is more demanding but the performance is worth the effort.

      Uh what? C1's are sit ins were not stable. C1's require talent to paddle... Sit in Kayaks are awesome and are not "trapping people under water." The older versions had two wood boards to help you lock in with your knee's and should you flip and we did the whole idea was to keep you in if you wanted to give you the opportunity to push back up again. If you sucked - you relaxed your knees and fell out. Not possible with today's equipment - you flip you fall out- period.


      I don't fall out of either of my kayaks when I flip over. A decent outfitted boat with hip and knee pads is fairly tight and you don't fall out. Sit in kayaks have less initial stability then sit on top recreational boats. These recreational boats are huge chunks of plastic. You can easily stand up in most of them while fishing. Where these sit on top boats fail it's when the water is moving.

      I agree with you that c-1's are unstable.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • WiseOldOwl wrote:

      I get it - its in the details... what knee pads? haven't worn those since I left the canoe!


      They are attached to the inside off the boat where your knees naturally lean against the boat when sitting. The hip pads make the seat right so when you move the boat moves.

      Properly fitted foot pegs, knee pads and hip pads lock you into the boat so the boat becomes part of you.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Unfortunately you will not find a kayak to do all those things. You want long and narrow for lakes and still water, short and stubby for white water. Current Designs makes good boats for touring I had a Storm GT, fast, stable and carries about 400 lbs, out of about 200 boats on a float trip I'd say my CD Storm GT was the fastest(the kayaks you see paddling the Arctic ice are likely one of these), of course it had a supercharged engine driving it. I have a 13' Necky Manitou which is a good all round boat, paddles easy, maneuverable, stable, class 2 water no problem. The Necky Vector 13' sit on top is the best I've paddles for sit ons, has good cargo area for a cooler and gear, carries a lot of weight, stable and paddles easy for a sit-on-top, I did a 16 mile float on the Etowah, camped, and paddled back up stream to the put in without a problem ( the driving rain and tornados may have made it seam easier that day).
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Rasty wrote:

      WiseOldOwl wrote:

      I get it - its in the details... what knee pads? haven't worn those since I left the canoe!


      They are attached to the inside off the boat where your knees naturally lean against the boat when sitting. The hip pads make the seat right so when you move the boat moves.

      Properly fitted foot pegs, knee pads and hip pads lock you into the boat so the boat becomes part of you.


      how do you get out if you can't roll?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      WiseOldOwl wrote:

      I get it - its in the details... what knee pads? haven't worn those since I left the canoe!


      They are attached to the inside off the boat where your knees naturally lean against the boat when sitting. The hip pads make the seat right so when you move the boat moves.

      Properly fitted foot pegs, knee pads and hip pads lock you into the boat so the boat becomes part of you.


      how do you get out if you can't roll?


      i never learned to roll (except by accident a couple times in the pool) but i was able to wet exit 100% of the time. its not hard.
      2,000 miler
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      WiseOldOwl wrote:

      I get it - its in the details... what knee pads? haven't worn those since I left the canoe!


      They are attached to the inside off the boat where your knees naturally lean against the boat when sitting. The hip pads make the seat right so when you move the boat moves.

      Properly fitted foot pegs, knee pads and hip pads lock you into the boat so the boat becomes part of you.


      how do you get out if you can't roll?


      Pull the loop on the spray skirt and slide out. Try not hitting your head.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • If I ever get my shoulder healed so I can do serious paddling I may get a Necky Manitou 14', I was over at the Terrapin Creek Outfitter when they unloaded a shipment and sat in it, fit like a glove, can't believe I left there without buying it, went back later and it was gone, would be a good all round boat for longer trips and day tripping/fishing as well.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Drybones ().

    • TJ - unfortunately over here is a drama night with my son... best answer is you are concerned about nothing... Some of the best hiking clubs offer kayak course in college or YMCA pools. IF you plan to do some serious white water like I did - take the course and visit the library there are several books on running rapids and dams.. reading the water is key...

      look at this another way. You took a class or hung with a parent to learn how to drive... good kayaking is just the same.
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup: