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Bear attack

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    • I have friends that live not far from there and it is bear country. Lots of bears. They're as common as deer. Daily sightings in residential neighborhoods. I can only imagine that they must have had to fire that bear up being they are very used to humans in that area.
      RIAP
    • hikerboy wrote:

      it doesnt say if anyone witnessed the actual attack, but im inclined to believe that running from it triggered its chase instinct.


      There has never been a known fatality from a black bear attacking a group of more than 4 people. Also almost all black bear fatalities are by bears behaving as predators (88%). This is consistent with the reports that the bear was stalking the group but didn't attack until they split up. If they had stayed together, they would probably be OK. And to keep it in perspective, this happens in the eastern US about once over 30 years.
    • ".....the incident would mark the only fatal bear attack ever recorded in New Jersey."
      "A bear was located at the scene and immediately euthanized."

      these two statements struck me as interesting. So a bear has never "fatally" attacked anyone in NJ
      and they located "A" bear and euthanized it? So either they randomly found a bear and killed it or there was something about this bear that would be indicative based on its appearance and behavior that would indicate it was the bear that did the attack
      RIAP
    • A.T.Lt wrote:

      ".....the incident would mark the only fatal bear attack ever recorded in New Jersey."
      "A bear was located at the scene and immediately euthanized."

      these two statements struck me as interesting. So a bear has never "fatally" attacked anyone in NJ
      and they located "A" bear and euthanized it? So either they randomly found a bear and killed it or there was something about this bear that would be indicative based on its appearance and behavior that would indicate it was the bear that did the attack


      nj.com/passaic-county/index.ss…ession_officials_say.html

      "At 5:54 p.m., police officers and search and rescue personnel found Patel's body, Storbeck said. He sustained bite and claw wounds. Police officers found the bear approximately 30 yards from the body and
      euthanized the animal, Storbeck told reporters. Officials said it appeared that the bear was guarding the body and may have considered Patel a food source. All five of the hikers were carrying granola bars and water, officials said. The West Milford Search and Rescue team clapped to scare the 299-pound male away, but it kept circling, Storbeck said. Finally, a West Milford Police Officer shot the bear twice with a shotgun, killing it."

      The body of the bear will be tested to see if it was the culprit (I assume by DNA testing - matching bear DNA on the victim or human DNA on the bear or both). Based on this news story, I think they are confident they have the right bear.
    • Wow, I remember the couple miles between Greenwood Lake and Wawayanda State Park, and how gloomy the woods were in a couple of spots, and how I was certain I'd seen some very, very fresh bear tracks right on the trail. I walked as fast as my little legs would carry me through that section. The whole Kitatinny ridge is bear country
    • That is called panic, not a plan. It is highly probable the living four will second guess their actions for the rest of their lives. I am not going to judge. I would hope I would stick together. Then again, I have never had a bear stalking me. When they killed the bear, it was circling the authorities. Lucky for them, someone had a shotgun. I tend to think something was seriously wrong with this bear.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • rafe wrote:

      Wow, I remember the couple miles between Greenwood Lake and Wawayanda State Park, and how gloomy the woods were in a couple of spots, and how I was certain I'd seen some very, very fresh bear tracks right on the trail. I walked as fast as my little legs would carry me through that section. The whole Kitatinny ridge is bear country


      Sounds like NJ might not be the best place for night hiking.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • HM posted this on FB:

      nj.com/passaic-county/index.ss…xplai.html#incart_m-rpt-2

      snip:

      Two hikers, a man and woman, warned the group of five men, including Rutgers University student Darsh Patel, about the bear following them in the Apshawa Preserve on Sept. 21, said Chief Timothy Storbeck of the West Milford Police. But the group of five continued on, spotting the bear and taking pictures of the animal with their cell phones from what they thought was a safe distance.

      They were wrong. Even though they turned around, the bear pursued the five - at first walking, then running.

      "The bear followed them and closed the distance. The bear and the group sped up their pace and eventually started running. They ran for several minutes before they became separated," said Storbeck in a statement today.

      Patel was later found dead near the circling bear, which was later found to have human remains in his mouth and stomach, according to test results released Tuesday.
      2,000 miler
    • This story is sad on so many levels. It is hard to criticize the actions of those involved. Bears don't attack unprovoked on the east coast (so history would seem to indicate). Why would they worry? Once the bear became aggressive, I am not sure I could just stand and call the bear's bluff. Could 5 men stop an aggressive bear with no weapons? This story seems to be an aberration. That fact is not very comforting to those that worry about me hiking. It would not help the dead man or comfort those that loved him, but I selfishly had hoped to hear that this bear was afflicted with something that caused it to act abnormally.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • twistwrist wrote:

      I fear crazy ass people way more than a bear.

      I've read a lot about bear spray. I need to research how that stuff actually works. Do most of you carry it with you?


      Not on the east coast. Exactly 1 person has been killed by a bear on the A.T. ever. If I tried to protect myself from everything that's ever killed one person then I'd need a box truck to carry it all. Many are killed on the trail each year by falls and heart attacks. If I really wanted to be safe I'd sooner carry bayer asprin than bear spray.
      >>>Advertise here! Affordable rates and no long term contracts. Send a PM for more details!<<<
    • I carried it across Maine. I did so because I fear my mother and wife. They ganged up on me. I did not see anyone else carrying it. Many teased me about my tiny "fire extinguisher" I was carrying. I ditched it on my walk across New Hampshire until my mother found out. She told me she was having nightmares about a bear eating me. She made me promise to carry it again. I really don't want to carry it anymore. What can I say. I love my wife and mother.

      If your concern is not bears, but rather people, a 1.5oz mace spray might be a better option than the typical 12oz bear spray.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by BirdBrain ().

    • twistwrist wrote:

      I fear crazy ass people way more than a bear.

      I've read a lot about bear spray. I need to research how that stuff actually works. Do most of you carry it with you?


      No. In my years of hiking I've only seen a bear up-close and personal on one occasion. I stopped. We eyed each other for a few seconds... then the bear went back to grazing. When I began walking again Mr. Bear took off. This was in Shenandoah Nat'l. Park.


    • There are LOTS of bears in the SNP, I have come with a couple of yards several times, and they run away very fast. One thing I started doing when traveling thru bear areas, is to make sounds like humming, clicking stics, etc especially in 'tight' covered trail. The times I have gotten within a couple yards, I was making no noise, It was surprising to all parties involved. If you make a little noise, you should not have a (too) close encounter. Another potential situation is when the cubs are present, they will usually run up a tree while mama eyeballs you, of course I assume most people realize NOT to approach this situation. :)
    • BirdBrain wrote:

      ... Could 5 men stop an aggressive bear with no weapons? ...


      I would say almost certainly. There have been about 60 fatal black bear attacks in North America since 1900. The vast majority of those were by predatory bears, but none ever on a group of 5 people. From all the reports of this incident I have read, it sound like the bear was stalking the group, but it didn't seem to attack until they split up and the bear could take on one person.
    • max.patch wrote:

      HM posted this on FB:

      nj.com/passaic-county/index.ss…xplai.html#incart_m-rpt-2

      snip:

      Two hikers, a man and woman, warned the group of five men, including Rutgers University student Darsh Patel, about the bear following them in the Apshawa Preserve on Sept. 21, said Chief Timothy Storbeck of the West Milford Police. But the group of five continued on, spotting the bear and taking pictures of the animal with their cell phones from what they thought was a safe distance.

      They were wrong. Even though they turned around, the bear pursued the five - at first walking, then running.

      "The bear followed them and closed the distance. The bear and the group sped up their pace and eventually started running. They ran for several minutes before they became separated," said Storbeck in a statement today.

      Patel was later found dead near the circling bear, which was later found to have human remains in his mouth and stomach, according to test results released Tuesday.


      max.patch wrote:

      the self proclaimed "biggest trouble maker on whiteblaze" predicted that the investigation would prove that this tragic incident was the result of "foul play".

      wrong again.


      I like your in-site..+1!
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • max.patch wrote:

      chief wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      the self proclaimed "biggest trouble maker on whiteblaze" predicted that the investigation would prove that this tragic incident was the result of "foul play".

      wrong again.
      Grow a set max, tell us who you're calling out.


      trust me on this, everybody here knows exactly who i am talking about.


      You talkin 'bout me?......I don't go there enough to know who's who....I thought all the trouble makers left TOS and came here.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Astro wrote:

      rafe wrote:

      Wow, I remember the couple miles between Greenwood Lake and Wawayanda State Park, and how gloomy the woods were in a couple of spots, and how I was certain I'd seen some very, very fresh bear tracks right on the trail. I walked as fast as my little legs would carry me through that section. The whole Kitatinny ridge is bear country


      Sounds like NJ might not be the best place for night hiking.


      Black bears tusually not active at night.
      its all good
    • hikerboy wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      rafe wrote:

      Wow, I remember the couple miles between Greenwood Lake and Wawayanda State Park, and how gloomy the woods were in a couple of spots, and how I was certain I'd seen some very, very fresh bear tracks right on the trail. I walked as fast as my little legs would carry me through that section. The whole Kitatinny ridge is bear country


      Sounds like NJ might not be the best place for night hiking.


      Black bears tusually not active at night.


      Just around dusk and dawn?
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General