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Tarps

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    • I did my AT thru with a Campmor 10' X 10" tarp tent. I loved it & still have one. love the extra tie outs to set up in many combinations. When shelter were full I often had ample room for company & I became everyones best feiend at cook time. I now bought the same one as Coach & am intending to add some tie outs for versatility. Depending on the area I like to set up lean to style or A-frame aech
    • When I was a young scout, our troop backpacked alot. Our Ass't scoutmaster,another Jarhead (my dad), taught us to go-lite. :silly: :lol: :woohoo: 1967 (40lbs) :ohmy: :S 2.gif ........we did not use tents, we used 10x10 sheets of plastic, rigged as I rig the Hooch. That is how I've always rolled.....tents, not so much. ;)
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup:
    • I am probably repeating myself, but I have an Etowah Gear 8 by 10 sil-nylon tarp, Kelty TripTease, 6 Vargo Titanium shepherds hook tent pegs, and a Granite Gear Haven bug tent. The ridge line connects to the tarp at the center of the tarp and the center of each 8' side. Each 10' side is tied to a line which has loops at both ends. Each side line has an elastic loop attached at the midpoint of the 10' side. Four stakes secure the loops at the ends of the side lines. Two more stakes secure the elastic loops. If I expect rain, I put a rock over the line near each stake, to prevent spattered mud and water.

      A small sack holds the stakes, and goes in a larger sack in which I stuff the rest of my shelter system. The system weighs a little over 2 pounds.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • WanderingStovie wrote:

      I am probably repeating myself, but I have an Etowah Gear 8 by 10 sil-nylon tarp, Kelty TripTease, 6 Vargo Titanium shepherds hook tent pegs, and a Granite Gear Haven bug tent. The ridge line connects to the tarp at the center of the tarp and the center of each 8' side. Each 10' side is tied to a line which has loops at both ends. Each side line has an elastic loop attached at the midpoint of the 10' side. Four stakes secure the loops at the ends of the side lines. Two more stakes secure the elastic loops. If I expect rain, I put a rock over the line near each stake, to prevent spattered mud and water.

      A small sack holds the stakes, and goes in a larger sack in which I stuff the rest of my shelter system. The system weighs a little over 2 pounds.


      Sounds interesting and I appreciate the detail. Have you posted a pic before?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      I am probably repeating myself, but I have an Etowah Gear 8 by 10 sil-nylon tarp, Kelty TripTease, 6 Vargo Titanium shepherds hook tent pegs, and a Granite Gear Haven bug tent. The ridge line connects to the tarp at the center of the tarp and the center of each 8' side. Each 10' side is tied to a line which has loops at both ends. Each side line has an elastic loop attached at the midpoint of the 10' side. Four stakes secure the loops at the ends of the side lines. Two more stakes secure the elastic loops. If I expect rain, I put a rock over the line near each stake, to prevent spattered mud and water.

      A small sack holds the stakes, and goes in a larger sack in which I stuff the rest of my shelter system. The system weighs a little over 2 pounds.


      Sounds interesting and I appreciate the detail. Have you posted a pic before?

      Sorry, no pictures. I take pictures if I car camp, but then I use a cheap 7 X 7 tent with two flexible poles that cross at the apex and end at the four corners. I can pull a real camera and tripod out of storage in a few days. I missed a good shot this morning at the pipeline crossing south of the Cove Mountain shelter.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • I'm in the process of developing a hammock set up and thought last night would be a good chance to do some testing in the back yard since we were to have severe thunderstorms, had the tarp & hammock hung early, about 9:00 thunder started in the distance, by the time I got my teeth brushed a downpour hit and I headed for the hammock only to find the tarp blown loose, I had one side set on hiking poles and the wind blew against the inside of the tarp and pulled the stakes up...lesson learned...better the back yard than the woods.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      I'm in the process of developing a hammock set up and thought last night would be a good chance to do some testing in the back yard since we were to have severe thunderstorms, had the tarp & hammock hung early, about 9:00 thunder started in the distance, by the time I got my teeth brushed a downpour hit and I headed for the hammock only to find the tarp blown loose, I had one side set on hiking poles and the wind blew against the inside of the tarp and pulled the stakes up...lesson learned...better the back yard than the woods.


      What kind of stakes?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I'm in the process of developing a hammock set up and thought last night would be a good chance to do some testing in the back yard since we were to have severe thunderstorms, had the tarp & hammock hung early, about 9:00 thunder started in the distance, by the time I got my teeth brushed a downpour hit and I headed for the hammock only to find the tarp blown loose, I had one side set on hiking poles and the wind blew against the inside of the tarp and pulled the stakes up...lesson learned...better the back yard than the woods.


      What kind of stakes?


      Aluminum Y stakes about 11" long, wind bent a couple of them...I'll upgrade to Easton stakes before using the tarp on trail.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.




    • I bought a hammock off the web from Walmart, $42.12, replaced the suspension with a restrictor cord...not a bad deal for something to toy with, probably use it for float trips and trips like this week end, going to Cheaha with a group to watch fire flies, then camp at Turnipseed and take a midnight dip under Cheaha Falls.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.




    • I bought a hammock off the web from Walmart, $42.12, replaced the suspension with a restrictor cord...not a bad deal for something to toy with, probably use it for float trips and trips like this week end, going to Cheaha with a group to watch fire flies, then camp at Turnipseed and take a midnight dip under Cheaha Falls.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Just a thought Drybones when the pictures you took are wonderful I noticed that the tarps don't touch the hammock....In winter that pitch becomes a requirement to lock in body warmth. By deduction its about 4- 10 degrees inside when pitched properly.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Here is my shelter setup.



      Basically, you have 3 guy lines along each side and a ridge line? That seems easy enough. I've been looking at guy lines and I'm thinking about buying this for my poncho/tarp.
      sierradesigns.com/product/reflective-guyline-kit


      Yup, its that simple. You may want to have your ridge line a little longer than the other guy lines. My corner guylines are 6 feet and my ridge guylines are 12 feet. That insures I can span the distance between two trees and wrap around them to tie off as well.

      Here is my source for glowire -- lawsonequipment.com/Reflective-Glowire-Cord-c128/
      Of course I talk to myself... sometimes I need expert advice.
    • Tuckahoe wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Here is my shelter setup.



      Basically, you have 3 guy lines along each side and a ridge line? That seems easy enough. I've been looking at guy lines and I'm thinking about buying this for my poncho/tarp.
      sierradesigns.com/product/reflective-guyline-kit


      Yup, its that simple. You may want to have your ridge line a little longer than the other guy lines. My corner guylines are 6 feet and my ridge guylines are 12 feet. That insures I can span the distance between two trees and wrap around them to tie off as well.

      Here is my source for glowire -- lawsonequipment.com/Reflective-Glowire-Cord-c128/


      I think all I need is 50' and Lawson Equipment is sold out. Unless someone tells me I'm doing it all wrong, I'm going to buy ZPacks 2.3mm Dyneema Reflective Glowire and some LineLoc 3 tensioners for my guy lines.

      zpacks.com/accessories/spectra_cord.shtml
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Tuckahoe wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Here is my shelter setup.



      Basically, you have 3 guy lines along each side and a ridge line? That seems easy enough. I've been looking at guy lines and I'm thinking about buying this for my poncho/tarp.
      sierradesigns.com/product/reflective-guyline-kit


      Yup, its that simple. You may want to have your ridge line a little longer than the other guy lines. My corner guylines are 6 feet and my ridge guylines are 12 feet. That insures I can span the distance between two trees and wrap around them to tie off as well.

      Here is my source for glowire -- lawsonequipment.com/Reflective-Glowire-Cord-c128/


      I think all I need is 50' and Lawson Equipment is sold out. Unless someone tells me I'm doing it all wrong, I'm going to buy ZPacks 2.3mm Dyneema Reflective Glowire and some LineLoc 3 tensioners for my guy lines.

      zpacks.com/accessories/spectra_cord.shtml


      Don't worry your doing it right.
      Of course I talk to myself... sometimes I need expert advice.
    • Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      Dutchware is a nice site, Drybones. I like the videos on how to use some of the hardware.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Here is my shelter setup.



      Basically, you have 3 guy lines along each side and a ridge line? That seems easy enough. I've been looking at guy lines and I'm thinking about buying this for my poncho/tarp.
      sierradesigns.com/product/reflective-guyline-kit


      I use more than 20' of ridge line, in case I need to set up between widely spaced trees and/or tie the ends around large diameter trees. Kelty TripTease is highly reflective. It makes it easy to find my shelter in the dark from 50 feet away, at least when my headlamp is on.

      There are five lines tied to my shelter. The ridge line is tied to the tarp and the bug tent. Each long side of the bug tent is tied to a line in 3 places. Each 10' side of the tarp is tied to a line in 5 places. I put a stake at each corner. Each corner stake passes through two loops. I carefully positioned and tied these loops and left them permanently tied for quick setup. There is no elastic at the corners. The lines are tied to the tarp and the tent at precise intervals so that the line can be stretched very tight without straining the tarp or tent. The loops at the ends of the lines swing in an arc, which gives me various points to try when driving a stake into the ground. If the ground is particularly rocky, I may try driving the stake at different angles into the ground.

      If the bug tent sags a little, I put shoes, bottles, or other gear inside at the four corners to stretch the floor and keep the netting away from my skin.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      The Dutchware hooks that Shug demonstrates in the video look easy to use. Right up my alley.

      My stuff from ZPacks should be here in a few days. I can't wait to start figuring out tarps.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      Yes it's wonderful - but keep in mind its UL and after a few years you need to replace it.

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Tuckahoe wrote:

      Shug from Hammockforums.net has started a video series on tarps that might be of interest...


      Thanks! These are great videos and Shug's very entertaining.


      ? Well perhaps I would have used the word "Outstanding"... but don't let him see that - it might get him even more over the top... Clearly he cannot be duplicated.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      The Dutchware hooks that Shug demonstrates in the video look easy to use. Right up my alley.

      My stuff from ZPacks should be here in a few days. I can't wait to start figuring out tarps.


      Are you making one for a hammock?
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      The Dutchware hooks that Shug demonstrates in the video look easy to use. Right up my alley.

      My stuff from ZPacks should be here in a few days. I can't wait to start figuring out tarps.


      Are you making one for a hammock?


      No. I just want to know how to hang a tarp. I will probably use it for cooking and stuff when it's raining.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      The Dutchware hooks that Shug demonstrates in the video look easy to use. Right up my alley.

      My stuff from ZPacks should be here in a few days. I can't wait to start figuring out tarps.


      Are you making one for a hammock?


      No. I just want to know how to hang a tarp. I will probably use it for cooking and stuff when it's raining.


      I've thought about having one for those rainy days it would be nice, but the gram weenie in me keeps over ruling.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • WiseOldOwl wrote:

      WanderingStovie wrote:

      Here is my shelter setup.




      more important - if I wanted a simmilar kit - what are we looking at?


      2 pounds 6 ounces

      Etowah Gear 8 x 10 sil-nylon tarp 14 ounces $75 at Etowah Outfitters
      Granite Gear Haven (discontinued) ???
      6 Vargo Titanium shepherds hook stakes $22.50 at Vargo Outdoors
      Kelty Triptease 100 feet (2x50) for $25.90 at Mountain Sports
      shock cord about 4 feet
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      The Dutchware hooks that Shug demonstrates in the video look easy to use. Right up my alley.

      My stuff from ZPacks should be here in a few days. I can't wait to start figuring out tarps.


      Are you making one for a hammock?


      No. I just want to know how to hang a tarp. I will probably use it for cooking and stuff when it's raining.


      I've thought about having one for those rainy days it would be nice, but the gram weenie in me keeps over ruling.



      I probably won't carry it often. I don't want my pack to get heavier but I like knowing how to do stuff. Ultimately, I'd like to carry a tarp instead of a tent but that won't be any time soon.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • TrafficJam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I finally bit the bullet and bought some Dutchware for my tarp, not cheap but really sweet stuff, greatly simplified hanging the tarp and it doesn't make my scale move.


      The Dutchware hooks that Shug demonstrates in the video look easy to use. Right up my alley.

      My stuff from ZPacks should be here in a few days. I can't wait to start figuring out tarps.


      Are you making one for a hammock?


      No. I just want to know how to hang a tarp. I will probably use it for cooking and stuff when it's raining.


      I've thought about having one for those rainy days it would be nice, but the gram weenie in me keeps over ruling.



      I probably won't carry it often. I don't want my pack to get heavier but I like knowing how to do stuff. Ultimately, I'd like to carry a tarp instead of a tent but that won't be any time soon.


      If it's warm enough to be raining instead of snowing, the Equinox 10 oz poncho/tarp is a good option...if I ever learn how to post a photo I'll show how I used it, it's good as rain gear, good as a quick temporary shelter to wait out a storm, and I have used it as a shelter but wouldn't recommend it as a primary shelter.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:



      If it's warm enough to be raining instead of snowing, the Equinox 10 oz poncho/tarp is a good option...if I ever learn how to post a photo I'll show how I used it, it's good as rain gear, good as a quick temporary shelter to wait out a storm, and I have used it as a shelter but wouldn't recommend it as a primary shelter.


      I think if you are going this route-folks do not take the time to pre-make guys and get aluminum or serious pegs. I will put 6 guys in glow wire and pegs in so I can quickly set up using the hiking poles to make a quick shelter - I don't mind getting wet - but who needs to be soaked?
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • WiseOldOwl wrote:

      Drybones wrote:



      If it's warm enough to be raining instead of snowing, the Equinox 10 oz poncho/tarp is a good option...if I ever learn how to post a photo I'll show how I used it, it's good as rain gear, good as a quick temporary shelter to wait out a storm, and I have used it as a shelter but wouldn't recommend it as a primary shelter.


      I think if you are going this route-folks do not take the time to pre-make guys and get aluminum or serious pegs. I will put 6 guys in glow wire and pegs in so I can quickly set up using the hiking poles to make a quick shelter - I don't mind getting wet - but who needs to be soaked?


      My lines are kept in the bag with the poncho and ready to use...with several configurations.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      WiseOldOwl wrote:

      Drybones wrote:



      If it's warm enough to be raining instead of snowing, the Equinox 10 oz poncho/tarp is a good option...if I ever learn how to post a photo I'll show how I used it, it's good as rain gear, good as a quick temporary shelter to wait out a storm, and I have used it as a shelter but wouldn't recommend it as a primary shelter.


      I think if you are going this route-folks do not take the time to pre-make guys and get aluminum or serious pegs. I will put 6 guys in glow wire and pegs in so I can quickly set up using the hiking poles to make a quick shelter - I don't mind getting wet - but who needs to be soaked?


      My lines are kept in the bag with the poncho and ready to use...with several configurations.


      This may be stupid but what do you mean by that? How do you have several configurations ready to use? Wouldn't you have to move your guy lines around to make different configurations?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      WiseOldOwl wrote:

      Drybones wrote:



      If it's warm enough to be raining instead of snowing, the Equinox 10 oz poncho/tarp is a good option...if I ever learn how to post a photo I'll show how I used it, it's good as rain gear, good as a quick temporary shelter to wait out a storm, and I have used it as a shelter but wouldn't recommend it as a primary shelter.


      I think if you are going this route-folks do not take the time to pre-make guys and get aluminum or serious pegs. I will put 6 guys in glow wire and pegs in so I can quickly set up using the hiking poles to make a quick shelter - I don't mind getting wet - but who needs to be soaked?


      My lines are kept in the bag with the poncho and ready to use...with several configurations.


      This may be stupid but what do you mean by that? How do you have several configurations ready to use? Wouldn't you have to move your guy lines around to make different configurations?


      Well this is awkward - You kind of know the answer to the question.. will a picture do?
      [IMG:http://www.hunting.survivalbill.ca/wp-content/forum-image-uploads/admin/signature/tarp-setups.jpg]
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • I'll try to explain my question. I have a countermarch loom that requires a complicated tie-up system. Every time I want to weave a new pattern, I have to change the tie-ups. There is a basic configuration that allows me to only switch a couple of ties to change the pattern. Does that make sense? I thought Drybones was saying he did the same thing...had some sort of way he tied his tarp so he could easily do multiple configurations.


      I like that pic of the different configurations, WOO, that clears a few things up.
      Images
      • image.jpg

        967.05 kB, 2,048×1,682, viewed 118 times
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis