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Where to go Backpacking: outside USA

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    • Where to go Backpacking: outside USA

      A lot of interesting ideas to see a lot of other continents. And while backpacking, probably more others forms of transportation than just hiking. Central America Gringo Trail would allow me to see a lot of my students from the past 18 years in their own countries and even hometowns. South American Gringo would also be interesting since I loved living in Brazil and always intrigued by Bolivia since seeing Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

      The European Grand Tour probably the easiest. But also the most $$$.

      indietraveller.co/where-to-go-backpacking/
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • The Chilkoot Trail has my interest. It's not exactly outside the USA as one end is in Alaska but the other is in Canada. It's 30 something miles over a high pass. The trail follows the route of those who were going to Alaska to strike it rich during the Klondike gold rush. Evidently there are items all along the trail left there by the gold crazed travelers. I've read that it's considered the world's longest museum.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      The Chilkoot Trail has my interest. It's not exactly outside the USA as one end is in Alaska but the other is in Canada. It's 30 something miles over a high pass. The trail follows the route of those who were going to Alaska to strike it rich during the Klondike gold rush. Evidently there are items all along the trail left there by the gold crazed travelers. I've read that it's considered the world's longest museum.
      I think that's the trail Parker from Gold Rush hiked during the off season. Looked like a great trip, including the paddle across the lake...
    • I've studied overseas backpacking a lot and maybe someday I will get the chance to do some. However it looks like this article is referring to the other definition of backpacking, that is low cost travel long term travel that does not involve hiking. The question is if there are any developed trails in these areas. Otherwise you would be doing lots of road walking, although in rural area that wouldn't be so bad, however the logistics would be a challenge.

      Tops on my oversees hiking wish list would be the following:

      Mountains of NW Sweden. The cost wouldn't be so bad given that you can camp and hike anywhere (no permits, fees) and food would be your only daily expense, unless you want to shell out 50$ to stay in a wilderness hut with bunks, bedding, stove, kitchen and sauna. Easy logistics, well maintained trails if you want to hang out with fellow hikers, or endless off trail options where you can have whole mountains to yourself.

      Himalayan trails in Nepal. In some places there are lodges for trekkers in every village that provide room and board for about 30$ per day. The trails are the paths that people have used for thousands of years get around. Camping treks are a bit more if a logistical challenge as resupply options are limited, but guides can be hired to organize anything you want. Costs aren't too high as Nepal is one of the poorest countries in Asia.

      The Pamir Mountains of Tajikistan and Afghanistan. For real adventure go here. This may be the best place in the world if you want to hike in spectacular mountains with amazing local culture yet not ruined by excessive tourism. However there is almost no tourist infrastructure so logistics are a real problem, but there are books to tell you how to do it. The Tajikistan side would be relatively easy. The Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan is almost completely cut off from the rest of the world and doesn't have the security problems of the rest of the country. Homestays are possible if you do your research.

      New Zealand has an AT-like long distance trail (Te Araroa) It's Covid free, if they let you in. I need to research this one some more.
    • odd man out wrote:

      I've studied overseas backpacking a lot and maybe someday I will get the chance to do some. However it looks like this article is referring to the other definition of backpacking, that is low cost travel long term travel that does not involve hiking. The question is if there are any developed trails in these areas. Otherwise you would be doing lots of road walking, although in rural area that wouldn't be so bad, however the logistics would be a challenge.

      Tops on my oversees hiking wish list would be the following:

      Mountains of NW Sweden. The cost wouldn't be so bad given that you can camp and hike anywhere (no permits, fees) and food would be your only daily expense, unless you want to shell out 50$ to stay in a wilderness hut with bunks, bedding, stove, kitchen and sauna. Easy logistics, well maintained trails if you want to hang out with fellow hikers, or endless off trail options where you can have whole mountains to yourself.

      Himalayan trails in Nepal. In some places there are lodges for trekkers in every village that provide room and board for about 30$ per day. The trails are the paths that people have used for thousands of years get around. Camping treks are a bit more if a logistical challenge as resupply options are limited, but guides can be hired to organize anything you want. Costs aren't too high as Nepal is one of the poorest countries in Asia.

      The Pamir Mountains of Tajikistan and Afghanistan. For real adventure go here. This may be the best place in the world if you want to hike in spectacular mountains with amazing local culture yet not ruined by excessive tourism. However there is almost no tourist infrastructure so logistics are a real problem, but there are books to tell you how to do it. The Tajikistan side would be relatively easy. The Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan is almost completely cut off from the rest of the world and doesn't have the security problems of the rest of the country. Homestays are possible if you do your research.

      New Zealand has an AT-like long distance trail (Te Araroa) It's Covid free, if they let you in. I need to research this one some more.
      One of our former student's who was my greatest resource for input about the AT (he thru hiked in 2010 before our first trip in Thanksgiving that year) did the New Zealand Te Araroa a few years later (probably 2015 or 16) with his newlywed bride and loved it.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Since the original post of this thread was more backpacking overall instead of just strictly hiking trails I will add this one of some neat trails in Europe.

      All I hiked in Switzerland was Heidi's Mountain a couple of times in Appenzell. But of course I was with 4 children 7 and under. I guess I need to go back. :)

      www-travelstart-co-za.cdn.ampp…-europe-in-3-countries%2F
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General