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New Year Goals

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    • I set goals instead of making resolutions... maybe it’s the same thing but psychologically, it works better for me. :)

      I usually have something in mind but this year I haven’t thought about it. This year has been hard so I’ve been doing short term, monthly goals to keep myself on track.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      I set goals instead of making resolutions... maybe it’s the same thing but psychologically, it works better for me. :)

      I usually have something in mind but this year I haven’t thought about it. This year has been hard so I’ve been doing short term, monthly goals to keep myself on track.
      I like this wording better. Goals rather than resolutions. I don't want to set an unreasonable goal so I'm going to say that I'm aiming to walk at least a mile a day at least 5 days a week and average at least 10 miles a week. Bought my 2021 Metroparks pass this morning so I'm set for hiking in the Metroparks. Another goal is to do some backpacking on the AT in 2021; I'd like to do the SNP. None in 2020 unfortunately.
    • odd man out wrote:

      My goal for this year is to figure out the difference between a goal and an objective when filling out my annual planning document. Next year I will work on the difference between vision and mission statements.
      LOL
      SO glad I "Got to retire" and forget all that corporate BS...... Wife is still working in computer field (as I did) and has had some conference calls on Speaker Phone while WFH in the age of Covid. I had to leave the room as I heard the corporate BS-Speak. "Same Store competing sales for the under and over cost analysis of the Off Shore support model to produce active project Thru-put...."
      Shoot....I just threw up a little in my mouth just typing that......
      Pirating – Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    • rhjanes wrote:

      LOLSO glad I "Got to retire" and forget all that corporate BS...... Wife is still working in computer field (as I did) and has had some conference calls on Speaker Phone while WFH in the age of Covid. I had to leave the room as I heard the corporate BS-Speak. "Same Store competing sales for the under and over cost analysis of the Off Shore support model to produce active project Thru-put...."
      Shoot....I just threw up a little in my mouth just typing that......
      My daughter posted a funny bit on her FB page about how because of being quarantined, she and her husband now speak in corporate jargon while planning dinner.
    • Trillium wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I set goals instead of making resolutions... maybe it’s the same thing but psychologically, it works better for me. :)

      I usually have something in mind but this year I haven’t thought about it. This year has been hard so I’ve been doing short term, monthly goals to keep myself on track.
      I like this wording better. Goals rather than resolutions. I don't want to set an unreasonable goal so I'm going to say that I'm aiming to walk at least a mile a day at least 5 days a week and average at least 10 miles a week. Bought my 2021 Metroparks pass this morning so I'm set for hiking in the Metroparks. Another goal is to do some backpacking on the AT in 2021; I'd like to do the SNP. None in 2020 unfortunately.
      It's probably early to report but so far so good. I've walked every day in the City then a friend and I drove to Maybury State Park this afternoon and slogged through the snow and a tad icy hard packed snow. It was somewhat slow going but very invigorating.
    • Always appreciate Andrew Skurka's reasonable approach. My goal for 2021 is part of number 6 of his 7 steps, gaining more fitness before I hit the AT this summer, knowing much of it is the hardest parts there are. Planning more exercise and hikes. especially as things warm up in the Spring, and then a week or so trip like the Bartram Trail in June. Also try to moderate my diet better too, with goal of "relatively" leaner, stronger, and lighter body going up and down those rocky mountains of NH & ME.

      I have noticed since I started hiking the AT ten years ago that as your body ages there is a natural decline, so you need to be intentional to at least maintain your current ability (which unfortunately I often have not).

      outsideonline.com/2414193/how-to-plan-backpacking-trip
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Always appreciate Andrew Skurka's reasonable approach. My goal for 2021 is part of number 6 of his 7 steps, gaining more fitness before I hit the AT this summer, knowing much of it is the hardest parts there are. Planning more exercise and hikes. especially as things warm up in the Spring, and then a week or so trip like the Bartram Trail in June. Also try to moderate my diet better too, with goal of "relatively" leaner, stronger, and lighter body going up and down those rocky mountains of NH & ME.

      I have noticed since I started hiking the AT ten years ago that as your body ages there is a natural decline, so you need to be intentional to at least maintain your current ability (which unfortunately I often have not).

      outsideonline.com/2414193/how-to-plan-backpacking-trip
      I'll work on #7 (Conduct a Final Check). I keep having this reoccurring nightmare where I get to my first campsite on a backpacking trip and realize that I have forgotten to pack a bunch of fairly important things, like food, tent, and sleeping bag. It does make the pack lighter.
    • odd man out wrote:

      I'll work on #7 (Conduct a Final Check). I keep having this reoccurring nightmare where I get to my first campsite on a backpacking trip and realize that I have forgotten to pack a bunch of fairly important things, like food, tent, and sleeping bag. It does make the pack lighter.
      I forgot sleeping bags on a weekend trip once; luckily noticed it when we were putting our packs on at the trailhead. So instead of an overnight hike with a short 2nd day out, we just made it a long day hike. No big deal.
      2,000 miler
    • Astro wrote:

      Always appreciate Andrew Skurka's reasonable approach. My goal for 2021 is part of number 6 of his 7 steps, gaining more fitness before I hit the AT this summer, knowing much of it is the hardest parts there are. Planning more exercise and hikes. especially as things warm up in the Spring, and then a week or so trip like the Bartram Trail in June. Also try to moderate my diet better too, with goal of "relatively" leaner, stronger, and lighter body going up and down those rocky mountains of NH & ME.

      I have noticed since I started hiking the AT ten years ago that as your body ages there is a natural decline, so you need to be intentional to at least maintain your current ability (which unfortunately I often have not).

      outsideonline.com/2414193/how-to-plan-backpacking-trip
      When I read your first sentence, I was kind of shocked that the words "Andrew Skurka" and "reasonable approach" were in the same sentence related to each other. Holy Toledo! Then I read further and saw that Andrew's "reasonable approach" is what he advocates for others.

      I attended ALDHA's fall conference in Williamstown, Massachusetts back in 2011, if memory serves, and he was the headline speaker. He related a number of his EXTREMELY adventurous and dangerous hikes/adventures. Holy Toledo! I could never have been a girlfriend to a man who would take such dangerous trips. I had a whole lot of empathy for his mother. Both of these ladies were there and evidenced at least a few twinges at some of his most dangerous parts of his trips. I thought he needed to have his head examined.
    • Trillium wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Always appreciate Andrew Skurka's reasonable approach. My goal for 2021 is part of number 6 of his 7 steps, gaining more fitness before I hit the AT this summer, knowing much of it is the hardest parts there are. Planning more exercise and hikes. especially as things warm up in the Spring, and then a week or so trip like the Bartram Trail in June. Also try to moderate my diet better too, with goal of "relatively" leaner, stronger, and lighter body going up and down those rocky mountains of NH & ME.

      I have noticed since I started hiking the AT ten years ago that as your body ages there is a natural decline, so you need to be intentional to at least maintain your current ability (which unfortunately I often have not).

      outsideonline.com/2414193/how-to-plan-backpacking-trip
      When I read your first sentence, I was kind of shocked that the words "Andrew Skurka" and "reasonable approach" were in the same sentence related to each other. Holy Toledo! Then I read further and saw that Andrew's "reasonable approach" is what he advocates for others.
      I attended ALDHA's fall conference in Williamstown, Massachusetts back in 2011, if memory serves, and he was the headline speaker. He related a number of his EXTREMELY adventurous and dangerous hikes/adventures. Holy Toledo! I could never have been a girlfriend to a man who would take such dangerous trips. I had a whole lot of empathy for his mother. Both of these ladies were there and evidenced at least a few twinges at some of his most dangerous parts of his trips. I thought the needed to have his head examined.
      Thanks for getting past the first sentence. And yes I was referring to his book, presentation at Google. and website advice for us normal hikers. While I am really impressed by his adventures, that is so far from where I am.
      Really glad you had the opportunity to listen to him in person. :thumbup:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I too have Skurka's gear book. I like his approach that every gear list should be adapted to the unique needs of every hike (and hiker). It's different from the "there is one right wsy and it's my way" strategy you hear do often.

      I also think he coined the term "stupid light" for cutting weight just for the sake of cutting weight. Lightweight packing is not about being light, but rather about making effective cost-benefit analyses.

      Finally I like his willingness to think outside the box. He's written a lot about why the conventional "wisdom" on things like water proof breathable gear and footware is a load of hooey.

      Sure his adventures are beyond what I would do, but they do lend credibility to his recommendations.