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What does 3 season mean to you ?

    • What does 3 season mean to you ?

      Kathy and I have decided that when we finally get around to doing the southern half of the AT, south of Harper's Ferry, that we'd do it in the fall. So now I'm thinking about a quilt for 3 seasons. To me that means actual temperatures down to around 30 degrees. To be comfortable at 30 I suspect I'd need a sleep system that's rated to 20 degrees.

      What does 3 season mean to you when it comes to sleep systems, or even clothing?
    • Winter is 4th season. It means cold temps, snowfalls, camping and hiking in fresh snow. Handling blowing snow and snow loads takes different shelters.

      3 season to me, can be temps down to 10F, and involve camping/hiking on consolidated snow in spring. Days can be considerably warmer.....or not.

      Typically....mid wt down clothing, ~4oz down jackets, down pants, night temps to 10F , days in 20s, all are 3 season. 20F is a "summer" bag at high elevations.

      Imo, temps on southern AT are not too bad oct-dec. You can get cold nights in teens at higher el. , days in 30s ..clear skies....ice growing out of ground in weird plant like formations....great hiking conditions.....the real problem is rain starting mid nov. 35F rain is just a total spoiler. Ive quit and gone home because the rain was no fun. Everythings damp....and its cold too.

      The post was edited 5 times, last by Muddywaters ().

    • Agree to all above. It’s not the cold but the damp chill that you need to focus on. Having warm clothing is important but knowing how to manage moisture, wet gear, and wet clothing is even more important. The only time that I was on the verge of hypothermia and thought that I was in serious trouble, it wasn’t very cold...upper 40’s-low 50’s but had rained on me all day.

      You and Kathy have enough experience that you will be fine.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • clothing...

      Lots of debate about the efficacy of rain jackets and pants but for me, if it keeps my clothing fairly dry, it’s doing the job. So rain wear is a must for me for fall and spring hiking.

      A typical clothing list is long sleeved lightweight tech shirt, fleece jacket, hiking pants, down jacket, base layer top and pants, extra socks and under garments, ball cap (to keep rain off my glasses), wool hat, gloves, rain pants and jacket.

      And, as you know, having dedicated camp clothing is mandatory.

      It’s also important to have a trash bag for storing wet items and gear to decrease condensation in the tent...and hot food and drinks.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • New

      I found that for early spring or mid to late fall a 20* quilt left me chilled some nights on an inflatable insulated pad. I've since sold my 20* down Quilt and bought a 10* and now I supplement that with either a full length 1/8" foam or a cut down Z-rest and add clothes or my empty pack under my lower legs. I think I sleep colder than I used to.
      Fall can be all over the place here in Virginia. I've seen near blizzards and teens in October and 80 and dry in October.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
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    • New

      jimmyjam wrote:

      I found that for early spring or mid to late fall a 20* quilt left me chilled some nights on an inflatable insulated pad. I've since sold my 20* down Quilt and bought a 10* and now I supplement that with either a full length 1/8" foam or a cut down Z-rest and add clothes or my empty pack under my lower legs. I think I sleep colder than I used to.
      Fall can be all over the place here in Virginia. I've seen near blizzards and teens in October and 80 and dry in October.
      I am headed out on the Buffalo River Trail this weekend and was debating whether to take the 35* or 20* bag. Based upon feedback I think I am leaning to the 20*. For a weekend a 13oz penalty seems worth the trade off if things get cooler. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • New

      Three season has always meant 20 degree bag for me. I prefer down bags without side baffles where I can shake the down to bottom when warm & on top when cold. On the AT it was a TNF Purple Haze. Went to a Feathered Friend Rock Wren that I had oer-stufffed. It was stolen by a coworker years ago & I recently replaced it with a new version called a winter wren. I was impressed with it's loft. I look forward to using it in a month or two when I get it back. While working at Angels Rest Hiker Haven recently I loaned it to a former Marine on a thru-hike that was low on funds & using his poncho liner. I hope it helps him to finish his hike.