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Corona Virus and the Trail

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    • I would be eligible for a booster as of 10/6 based on my comorbidities. Dean Wormer was right - fat drunk and stupid is no way to go through life. But it does get you a Covid booster shot.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Gorham NH
    • LIhikers wrote:

      What are the rules for a booster shot for an oldsters with no known medical problems?

      Actually I wonder if I need a booster considering I just had Covid last month.
      65 years old or older, 6 months after your 2nd Pfizer shot (Moderna and J&J not yet approved). Some youngsters under 65 can still get the booster depending upon existing health conditions or occupation.

      If you had Covid you should still get the booster; I don't know if there is a recommended "waiting period" after recovery or not.

      Edit to add: Getting to leave for my shot and I'm looking over the instuctions -- it says that if you were diagnosed with Covid within 14 days of your appointment to reschedule and come back when you "feel healthy and well".
      2,000 miler

      The post was edited 1 time, last by max.patch ().

    • IMScotty wrote:

      I thought this was interesting. The group that was most 'Vaccine Hesitant' (by education level) was Ph.D's.


      I wouldn't put any stock into that study, despite the CMU association. If it's the one I'm thinking of, it was funded by Facebook, not peer-reviewed, and it was from an online, self-reported survey. Researchers: "Additionally, we assume the survey was completed in good faith. " I wouldn't hang my hat on such a study design. Doesn't make it wrong, but sure can't assume it's right.

      And what field of PhD makes a big difference I would think. Not all fields require the same fluency in science and critical thinking.

      "A lot of people think I have a PhD, and I'm smart enough to have one, so I guess I'll just click that box anyway ...." ;)
    • Astro wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Just booked my booster for tomorrow afternoon at the Walgreens less than a mile from home.
      I'm not eligible until mid Oct, and then only if they say that "teacher" includes university professor. Different people interpret it differently.
      That's odd. Don't see how professors could be excluded under any defintion of the term.
      Sometimes "teachers" is defined as K-12. That happened last spring. They said teachers were eligible but when I went to fill out the reservation form the question asked if I was a K-12 teacher. The computer spite out as ineligible. I think it is applied variably.
      Fortunately the Pharmacy College of our university is the one's giving our vaccines. Got both of mine Jan/Feb, so hopefully Oct I will be able to get the booster.
      My wife and I got our Pfizer boosters today. I thanked the Pharmacy Professor coordinating it for all the work she and the students put into doing this over the past 10 months and for having such a quick and smooth process. Since my wife is now also faculty at our university I believe she appreciated it more the prior process with the High School.
      And at least no snow an icy roads like the 2nd shot back in February. :thumbup:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Astro ().

    • No booster for me. Instead, I got the real thing. Either way, I’m covered for a while. :)

      It’s not been bad, just some congestion, headache, scratchy throat. Not being able to smell or taste is the worst…super freaky and I can’t wait until that’s better.

      I walked a a few miles the past two days and felt slow and draggy and was a little out of breath today while doing some cardio (hula hooping). I’m planning a BP trip in 2 weeks and wonder if I should expect some lingering breathing problems.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      No booster for me. Instead, I got the real thing. Either way, I’m covered for a while. :)

      It’s not been bad, just some congestion, headache, scratchy throat. Not being able to smell or taste is the worst…super freaky and I can’t wait until that’s better.

      I walked a a few miles the past two days and felt slow and draggy and was a little out of breath today while doing some cardio (hula hooping). I’m planning a BP trip in 2 weeks and wonder if I should expect some lingering breathing problems.
      I hope you are all better soon.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • FWIW, got 3rd Pfizer shot Thursday afternoon, and then hiked around 15 miles in the Ozarks between 12 noon Friday and 1pm Saturday. Only felt pain in my shoulder, which meant when rolling over in tent at night that shoulder was not an option. Worst of the three for me, but could have been due to student nurse/pharmacist that gave it. :rolleyes:

      Pehaps was little more tired. But hard to say since nearly two months since climbing up and down mountains. :)

      Key I guess is that I survived and hopefully will not be contributing to any hospital overcrowding. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      No booster for me. Instead, I got the real thing. Either way, I’m covered for a while. :)

      It’s not been bad, just some congestion, headache, scratchy throat. Not being able to smell or taste is the worst…super freaky and I can’t wait until that’s better.

      I walked a a few miles the past two days and felt slow and draggy and was a little out of breath today while doing some cardio (hula hooping). I’m planning a BP trip in 2 weeks and wonder if I should expect some lingering breathing problems.
      I take it that means you got a 'Breakthrough' case TJ?
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      No booster for me. Instead, I got the real thing. Either way, I’m covered for a while. :)

      It’s not been bad, just some congestion, headache, scratchy throat. Not being able to smell or taste is the worst…super freaky and I can’t wait until that’s better.

      I walked a a few miles the past two days and felt slow and draggy and was a little out of breath today while doing some cardio (hula hooping). I’m planning a BP trip in 2 weeks and wonder if I should expect some lingering breathing problems.
      Got to read slower, just realized you got Covid instead of some type of shot. Praying for a quick recovery.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      No booster for me. Instead, I got the real thing. Either way, I’m covered for a while. :)

      It’s not been bad, just some congestion, headache, scratchy throat. Not being able to smell or taste is the worst…super freaky and I can’t wait until that’s better.

      I walked a a few miles the past two days and felt slow and draggy and was a little out of breath today while doing some cardio (hula hooping). I’m planning a BP trip in 2 weeks and wonder if I should expect some lingering breathing problems.
      Sorry. to hear of your illness, I hope you recover quickly . I had it too despite being vaccinated. I had 3 days of being very sick, 3 days moderately sick and 3 days of just a little sick. The quarantine lasted longer than me feeling sick.
    • Thank you everyone. Compared to having RSV a few months ago, I didn’t get very sick, thank goodness for the vaccine. Tomorrow I’m officially off quarantine, Yay! Yippee! Hooray!

      …but there’s something about being forced to stay at home, dang I got so much stuff done. My violin practice has been unfocused the past few months so I got that under control and made really good progress. I also worked on two knitting projects, one weaving project, baked some bread and English muffins, fermented jalapeños, made kombucha, dehydrated sweet potatoes and peppers for BP meals, cleaned the house, walked a bunch of miles, practiced hula hooping, spent quality time in my hammock, watched the birds, listened to audiobooks…and I don’t know what else.

      I nearly went hiking yesterday but resisted, knowing it wasn’t the right thing to do until I was officially off quarantine. Can’t wait to get back on a trail.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Hula Hooping ?
      Now there's something I haven't thought or heard about in a hundred years. Is hula hooping a thing these days?
      I could be wrong but I think Hula hooping is mostly associated with the hippy lifestyle but it’s becoming more popular with fitness people.

      I’ve never been able to hoop and wanted to learn so bought one and started practicing. I just do plain old waist hooping, not dance or tricks. The key is a big hoop with grippy tape on the inside. I’m finding it to be relaxing and meditative plus good exercise.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • odd man out wrote:

      I can do it. I choose not to ;)
      Lol! I only do it in the privacy of my living room.

      (For me, being physically active as I age means keeping it interesting, fun, and fresh. I don’t do well with doing the same things over and over. It gets boring and I lose interest. And who cares anyway? I’m too old to worry about what people think.) :)
      Lost in the right direction.
    • I had to be "that guy" this morning.

      I took Dad to a lab to get some blood drawn for some medical tests. The lab has a requirement -- clearly posted -- that eveyone is required to wear a mask. Waiting room is at full capacity, and almost everyone there meets the "risk" category becasue of age.

      A man comes in and his mask is covering only his mouth, with his nose totally exposed. He sits directly behind us. I wait a couple minutes to see if he is going to adjust his mask and it it clear he isn't going to.

      So I turn around, point to my nose, and tell him his mask isn't on.

      Silence.

      I tell him his mask isn't covering his nose.

      Silence.

      I ask him if he is going to put his mask on.

      He tells me in an unfriendly tone to "mind my own business".

      So I report his ass.

      A couple minutes later a doctor comes to the room and calls his name.

      He ignores her.

      The doctor calls his name again.

      He ignores her.

      The doctor calls his name again.

      He ignores her.

      The doctor calls his name a 4th time.

      This time he gets up and goes to the doctor.

      The doctor tells him that masks are required and asks him to cover his nose. He replies (maybe it's true, maybe it's not) that he has severe lung disease. The doctor says that masks are required and they need to remove him from the waiting room and put him in a private room while he waits.

      I turned to Dad and said "some people are dumb asses".

      The lab handled this in the most professional manner possible.
      2,000 miler
    • Took dad to Walmart yesterday for his covid booster and flu shot and I went to Costco today for my flu shot.

      Both pharmacies were slammed with people. Nothing like the threat of a killer variant to get the 50% of people who can read a science book off the couch and into the pharmacy.

      I enjoyed getting the stink eye from a few people when they called me ahead of the other 20 or so people waiting (I had an appointment). :)
      2,000 miler

      The post was edited 1 time, last by max.patch ().

    • max.patch wrote:


      I enjoyed getting the stink eye from a few people when they called me ahead of the other 20 or so people waiting (I had an appointment). :)
      During the first vaccination events, I got severe scowls and complaints from elderly folks lined up for it because they thought I was cutting the line. I had been instructed to go to a certain window at the pharmacy counter to put my name on a wait list for extra/unused doses at the end of the day.

      I was denounced enough by those old folks that when they DID have extra doses that day, the pharmacist called me first because, she said, she felt bad I had endured such unfair abuse.
    • I'm really looking forward to all of the post-mortem reviews and dissertations related to the various government and business responses to the pandemic. The Great Influenza was a good (and long) read on the 1917 pandemic. Hopefully there will be a similar manuscript in the next 10 years on Covid-19.

      My employer is moving to a GREEN phase on Monday - no restrictions on vaccinated employees. We'll see if it lasts through the spring.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Gorham NH
    • Stalking Tortoise, I believe people are so tied to their belief systems, that it will be years or decades before an honest appraisal of what worked and what did not can happen.

      I'll offer my belief system and hopefully we can all come back here in a decade and have a laugh at what an idiot I am...

      • Social distancing, while necessary while we figured things out, has had no lasting impact. Most people get this bug from their family and close friends, and most humans are too social of an animal to ever abandon interacting with friends and family.
      • Cloth masks have had no meaningful impact on stopping the spread. The only studies I have seen where these masks have shown value have been conducted in the laboratory. In 'the wild' with real human behavior they seem to have little impact. I believe it is time we drop the charade.
      • Huge damage has been done to the education, socialization, and mental health of our children because of these interventions. I believe that the harm done to our children is greater than the risk they faced. I find this situation immoral. The losses of young adults to suicide and drug overdose has been exasperated by our response to the pandemic.
      • The speed at which we developed vaccines to fight Covid was a triumph of science and government working together. I applaud this. That said, the results (in terms of lasting immunity and preventing transmission) have been disappointing. But that seems to be the nature of vaccines for fast mutating coronaviruses.
      • I believe the vaccines have saved many lives and prevented more severe outcomes from Covid.
      • I also believe that the number of vaccine related injuries is also great and should be of concern.
      • The biggest sin in our response, I think, is that it was not focused on the most vulnerable, the elderly, immune compromised and the obese. If we had concentrated our efforts there, more lives could have been saved.
      • Another monstrous sin is that our government did not do more educating people on how to promote the health of their immune system. In fact, people who tried to do so were often banned for spreading 'misinformation.' This is insanity. The role that Vitamin D3 plays in immune heath is well documented. Nearly half of adults are Vitamin D deficient. A simple, inexpensive dietary supplement could have saved so many lives. But of course, there is little profit in doing that.
      • Improving ventilation in indoor spaces is an intervention that made a big difference.
      • We will never discover what the true origins of this virus was.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Stalking Tortoise, I believe people are so tied to their belief systems, that it will be years or decades before an honest appraisal of what worked and what did not can happen.

      I'll offer my belief system and hopefully we can all come back here in a decade and have a laugh at what an idiot I am...

      • Social distancing, while necessary while we figured things out, has had no lasting impact. Most people get this bug from their family and close friends, and most humans are too social of an animal to ever abandon interacting with friends and family.
      • Cloth masks have had no meaningful impact on stopping the spread. The only studies I have seen where these masks have shown value have been conducted in the laboratory. In 'the wild' with real human behavior they seem to have little impact. I believe it is time we drop the charade.
      • Huge damage has been done to the education, socialization, and mental health of our children because of these interventions. I believe that the harm done to our children is greater than the risk they faced. I find this situation immoral. The losses of young adults to suicide and drug overdose has been exasperated by our response to the pandemic.
      • The speed at which we developed vaccines to fight Covid was a triumph of science and government working together. I applaud this. That said, the results (in terms of lasting immunity and preventing transmission) have been disappointing. But that seems to be the nature of vaccines for fast mutating coronaviruses.
      • I believe the vaccines have saved many lives and prevented more severe outcomes from Covid.
      • I also believe that the number of vaccine related injuries is also great and should be of concern.
      • The biggest sin in our response, I think, is that it was not focused on the most vulnerable, the elderly, immune compromised and the obese. If we had concentrated our efforts there, more lives could have been saved.
      • Another monstrous sin is that our government did not do more educating people on how to promote the health of their immune system. In fact, people who tried to do so were often banned for spreading 'misinformation.' This is insanity. The role that Vitamin D3 plays in immune heath is well documented. Nearly half of adults are Vitamin D deficient. A simple, inexpensive dietary supplement could have saved so many lives. But of course, there is little profit in doing that.
      • Improving ventilation in indoor spaces is an intervention that made a big difference.
      • We will never discover what the true origins of this virus was.

      Good assessment. I can go for all of them except the last.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Stalking Tortoise, I believe people are so tied to their belief systems, that it will be years or decades before an honest appraisal of what worked and what did not can happen.

      I'll offer my belief system and hopefully we can all come back here in a decade and have a laugh at what an idiot I am...

      • Social distancing, while necessary while we figured things out, has had no lasting impact. Most people get this bug from their family and close friends, and most humans are too social of an animal to ever abandon interacting with friends and family.
      • Cloth masks have had no meaningful impact on stopping the spread. The only studies I have seen where these masks have shown value have been conducted in the laboratory. In 'the wild' with real human behavior they seem to have little impact. I believe it is time we drop the charade.
      • Huge damage has been done to the education, socialization, and mental health of our children because of these interventions. I believe that the harm done to our children is greater than the risk they faced. I find this situation immoral. The losses of young adults to suicide and drug overdose has been exasperated by our response to the pandemic.
      • The speed at which we developed vaccines to fight Covid was a triumph of science and government working together. I applaud this. That said, the results (in terms of lasting immunity and preventing transmission) have been disappointing. But that seems to be the nature of vaccines for fast mutating coronaviruses.
      • I believe the vaccines have saved many lives and prevented more severe outcomes from Covid.
      • I also believe that the number of vaccine related injuries is also great and should be of concern.
      • The biggest sin in our response, I think, is that it was not focused on the most vulnerable, the elderly, immune compromised and the obese. If we had concentrated our efforts there, more lives could have been saved.
      • Another monstrous sin is that our government did not do more educating people on how to promote the health of their immune system. In fact, people who tried to do so were often banned for spreading 'misinformation.' This is insanity. The role that Vitamin D3 plays in immune heath is well documented. Nearly half of adults are Vitamin D deficient. A simple, inexpensive dietary supplement could have saved so many lives. But of course, there is little profit in doing that.
      • Improving ventilation in indoor spaces is an intervention that made a big difference.
      • We will never discover what the true origins of this virus was.

      For the last item, there will be finger-pointing until the end of time.

      Living with a nurse gave me a different perspective on masks. As used by the great majority of humans, masks were all but useless. About as effective as a sneeze guard over a salad bar. Watching my wife fit her mask (cloth with a charcoal filter inside or N-95) made me understand the effort required to prevent virus transmission.

      The timing of the pandemic in the middle of a contentious presidential election cycle was very unfortunate. I could cite examples all day on how various parties focused on political gain vs. health issues. And it's still going on today. Adding in racial unrest / distrust was another factor that prevented progress.

      I look forward to telling stories to my (yet to be born) grandkids some day.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Gorham NH
    • To the point about the elderly, infirm, obese, my father in law was in an assisted living facility. They followed strict guidelines and went into a lock down. Staff entering were all tested (early on was just temp checking). they had two maintenance people test positive that first year, who were sent home with pay to isolate. Those workers were not directly around patients. Not one of the patients got Covid. Another nursing home we know of, wasn't near as careful and not only did they have something like 5 patients get sick, a few passed away. But it WAS very hard on the patients.
      Pirating – Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    • I drove GA-AZ last fall and just returned from doing it again. I was amazed at the dramatic decrease in mask wearing at the truck stops and rest areas. And to be totally honest, I found myself several times in those locations where I had forgot to put on a mask. I don't think I've ever done that since I started to wear a mask back in 2020.

      I just got back from Costco today and noticed that they put a new sign at the entrance recommending that everyone wear a mask in accordance with the CDC recommendation. Most people there, including employees, were maskless.

      I happened to be home when the mail lady drove by. I was surprised to see that she was wearing a mask in her postal truck. I couldn't tell, but I bet she had on gloves again like she wore when the pandemic first started. It's been a long while since she has worn a mask.

      And to conclude, on satellite radio after the exercise and nutrition show I listen to the next show was about Covid. I don't listen to this. But before I could change stations, the hosts (both doctors) were commenting on masks. They said it's a shame that it seems like people only wear masks when they're told to, and haven't figured out that mask wearing protects both the wearer and the people around them.

      Just my observations.
      2,000 miler
    • Hello Max,

      I flew. coast-to-coast this past week. If you don't want to be around the massless, stay off the planes. I estimate the percent wearing masks at only 30% on my flight. It did seem to be higher in first-class, but this is a small sample. I will have to investigate further.

      As you know, California has been pretty severe in its Covid requirements (and cases there are spiking right now). CA still has masking requirements on its public transport (constantly being broadcast on the train I took). Interestingly, the compliance to this mandatory masking seemed to be lower than what I was seeing for suggested masking back home in Boston. Appears some people have just had enough with government mandates.

      The transit Police were masked (I imagine their job depends on it), but they could care less what the public was doing on the platforms or in the trains. They said nothing. I imagine they have bigger fish to fry.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier