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Hiking Plans 2019

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    • Well, I just booked the 4th of July in Madison Hut. I want to finish the 2 ends of my hike from last year. I plan to climb up Airline trail, spend the night at Madison Hut, then get to Pinkham next day. Get a bunk or room for the night then climb up Webster Cliff Saturday, stay at Nauman site and return home Sunday.

      In August, HB and I are starting at Rt. 2, Traversing the Carters-Moriah range, staying at Carter Notch Hut, then heading into the Wild River Wilderness for a few more days.

      The only 2 things 'Planned' this year so far.

      I would love to get to the Smokies in the fall.
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup:
    • CoachLou wrote:

      I would love to get to the Smokies in the fall.
      That's my plan, just not this year.

      The way my vacation calendar is shaping up, I just might have the time to take two trips to New Hampshire this year. I'd love to run into Astro as I finish the Franconia Ridge section.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, Max Patch to Franconia Notch NH and the Gale River Trail to Crawford Notch NH.
    • Well, since last year's easy trip got blown up by some "undetermined mosquito-borne virus" picked up in the Florida Keys, I ended up going to Edinburgh, Scotland with my son (his girlfriend is in med school and they screwed with her time off).

      We got a look at the Highlands and found out about the West Highland Way. It looks interesting - a distillery is a few hundred yards off the trail - and the whole trail is only 96 miles. The terrain is no worse then some I've done. So far, my son and sister are in. We'll see what happens when it's time to buy air tickets.

      From the guides/maps, it doesn't look to be too difficult, especially with the towns and their pubs near by.

      Whatever happens, planning is always fun.
    • EdDzierzak wrote:

      ...We got a look at the Highlands and found out about the West Highland Way. It looks interesting - a distillery is a few hundred yards off the trail - and the whole trail is only 96 miles. The terrain is no worse then some I've done. So far, my son and sister are in. We'll see what happens when it's time to buy air tickets.
      From the guides/maps, it doesn't look to be too difficult, especially with the towns and their pubs near by.
      I will have to look into that one. We loved our trip through the highlands several years ago, but it was by car, not foot. A trail with pubs is an attractive option. There is also the Dingle Way in Ireland which loops around the Dingle Peninsula. It is 111 miles long. It also has pubs en route.
    • EdDzierzak wrote:

      Well, since last year's easy trip got blown up by some "undetermined mosquito-borne virus" picked up in the Florida Keys, I ended up going to Edinburgh, Scotland with my son (his girlfriend is in med school and they screwed with her time off).

      We got a look at the Highlands and found out about the West Highland Way. It looks interesting - a distillery is a few hundred yards off the trail - and the whole trail is only 96 miles. The terrain is no worse then some I've done. So far, my son and sister are in. We'll see what happens when it's time to buy air tickets.

      From the guides/maps, it doesn't look to be too difficult, especially with the towns and their pubs near by.

      Whatever happens, planning is always fun.
      I understand that one of the challenges on that trail is 'wet feet.' A few days of walking on wet spongy bog takes its toll on the skin of your feet. Bring lots of dry socks. Looks like a great trail to hike with some nice town stops along the way.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • odd man out wrote:

      EdDzierzak wrote:

      ...We got a look at the Highlands and found out about the West Highland Way. It looks interesting - a distillery is a few hundred yards off the trail - and the whole trail is only 96 miles. The terrain is no worse then some I've done. So far, my son and sister are in. We'll see what happens when it's time to buy air tickets.
      From the guides/maps, it doesn't look to be too difficult, especially with the towns and their pubs near by.
      I will have to look into that one. We loved our trip through the highlands several years ago, but it was by car, not foot. A trail with pubs is an attractive option. There is also the Dingle Way in Ireland which loops around the Dingle Peninsula. It is 111 miles long. It also has pubs en route.
      I'm kind of partial to Scotland at this point as I have a sister living in Edinburgh. Kinda helps with hotel costs...
    • EdDzierzak wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      EdDzierzak wrote:

      ...We got a look at the Highlands and found out about the West Highland Way. It looks interesting - a distillery is a few hundred yards off the trail - and the whole trail is only 96 miles. The terrain is no worse then some I've done. So far, my son and sister are in. We'll see what happens when it's time to buy air tickets.
      From the guides/maps, it doesn't look to be too difficult, especially with the towns and their pubs near by.
      I will have to look into that one. We loved our trip through the highlands several years ago, but it was by car, not foot. A trail with pubs is an attractive option. There is also the Dingle Way in Ireland which loops around the Dingle Peninsula. It is 111 miles long. It also has pubs en route.
      I'm kind of partial to Scotland at this point as I have a sister living in Edinburgh. Kinda helps with hotel costs...
      I was reading the WHW web page last night. It does look pretty great. I was wondering if camping was an option. I know some places they said camping was not allowed and other areas, if it is wet and boggy, camping probably isn't practical. We actually drove through that area on the last day of our trip to Scotland. I drove South from Ft William to Glen Coe. Here the road follows the coast but the trail goes cross country by Ben Nevis (tallest mountain in the UK). We never saw it however due to the clouds. The road meets the trails at the top of Glen Coe where the Kinghouse Hotel is. I checked out their web page. That would seem to be a sweet stop on the trail. It seems to be the only option for miles in both directions. The drive up Glen Coe is amazing. It is the sight of a famous massacre. You go up and up and up, but when you get to the top, curiously you don't go down, but the road levels off onto this the vast barren plain of Rannoch Moor which the trail crosses between Inveroran and Kingshouse. Then further south we drove along Loch Lommand, except the trail follows the east coast and the road follows the west coast. That is a real bare-knuckle drive as the busy narrow twisting road is usually right at the water's edge for mile after mile. It seems to go on for ever. I remember being exhausted after finally getting to the end of the lake.
    • odd man out wrote:

      EdDzierzak wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      EdDzierzak wrote:

      ...We got a look at the Highlands and found out about the West Highland Way. It looks interesting - a distillery is a few hundred yards off the trail - and the whole trail is only 96 miles. The terrain is no worse then some I've done. So far, my son and sister are in. We'll see what happens when it's time to buy air tickets.
      From the guides/maps, it doesn't look to be too difficult, especially with the towns and their pubs near by.
      I will have to look into that one. We loved our trip through the highlands several years ago, but it was by car, not foot. A trail with pubs is an attractive option. There is also the Dingle Way in Ireland which loops around the Dingle Peninsula. It is 111 miles long. It also has pubs en route.
      I'm kind of partial to Scotland at this point as I have a sister living in Edinburgh. Kinda helps with hotel costs...
      I was reading the WHW web page last night. It does look pretty great. I was wondering if camping was an option. I know some places they said camping was not allowed and other areas, if it is wet and boggy, camping probably isn't practical. We actually drove through that area on the last day of our trip to Scotland. I drove South from Ft William to Glen Coe. Here the road follows the coast but the trail goes cross country by Ben Nevis (tallest mountain in the UK). We never saw it however due to the clouds. The road meets the trails at the top of Glen Coe where the Kinghouse Hotel is. I checked out their web page. That would seem to be a sweet stop on the trail. It seems to be the only option for miles in both directions. The drive up Glen Coe is amazing. It is the sight of a famous massacre. You go up and up and up, but when you get to the top, curiously you don't go down, but the road levels off onto this the vast barren plain of Rannoch Moor which the trail crosses between Inveroran and Kingshouse. Then further south we drove along Loch Lommand, except the trail follows the east coast and the road follows the west coast. That is a real bare-knuckle drive as the busy narrow twisting road is usually right at the water's edge for mile after mile. It seems to go on for ever. I remember being exhausted after finally getting to the end of the lake.
      Camping is an option in most places. There is a section in Loch Lomond & Trossachs National Park that has camping restrictions from April to October but that shouldn't be a problem. Scotland has a "Right of Access" law which permits camping almost anywhere. It's known over there as "wild camping" i.e. camping outside an established campground. There are some exceptions but not many. See -> Camping in Scotland. Kind of like Leave No Trace. Don't mess with the livestock and you should be ok.

      Almost the first half is relatively tame. A few hills, but mostly little bumps. The bigger stuff is in the second half. That's why the recommended direction is NOBO. It gets you ready for the bigger stuff. It appears the highest point is 500 meters (about 1650 ft).

      I enjoy the planning but this is different from any planning I've done before. There will be pictures if we all survive. :P

      The post was edited 1 time, last by EdDzierzak ().

    • I think I've mentioned in the past that Kathy and I would like to spend this July and first half of August hiking.
      I'm starting to wonder when is the right time to ask my boss for a leave of absence. I've only been on the job about 13 months now and don't have that much time off due me. If they say no I might quit even though this is the second best job I've ever had. I might even reapply when we finish hiking. I want to give them enough time to replace me if need be without getting fired before July if they get up-set at me. I'm thinking sometime around the end of this month, April.

      Anybody have suggestions?
    • LIhikers wrote:

      I think I've mentioned in the past that Kathy and I would like to spend this July and first half of August hiking.
      I'm starting to wonder when is the right time to ask my boss for a leave of absence. I've only been on the job about 13 months now and don't have that much time off due me. If they say no I might quit even though this is the second best job I've ever had. I might even reapply when we finish hiking. I want to give them enough time to replace me if need be without getting fired before July if they get up-set at me. I'm thinking sometime around the end of this month, April.

      Anybody have suggestions?
      for the "second best job iv'e ever had", i would probably just fit my hiking into "their" schedule and like it! conversely, if i were determined to hike my schedule anyway, i'd just quit. they might be okay to let you go or they might try to keep you by giving you the time off without asking. in either case, they'll respect you more.

      to the point - the sooner the better.
    • When I took my first leave of absence I gave them a six week warning. Then I became an independent construction consultant for them and came and went as I pleased until just a couple of weeks ago. But I have a long long history with them dating back to 1986 and was once VP of two their companies. I say talk to them at least 4 to 6 weeks in advance, you might be surprised and they might gladly give you a LOA.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
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