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Took a walk today

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    • New

      My mother-in-law was born in Glencar, Co. Kerry, one of 13 children. Glencar is at the foot of the McGillicuddy Reeks and the family had very poor land. When she was 14 she was taken out of school and and sent out to earn her keep. She got a job as a domestic in the seaside village of Glenbeigh. She told me how she would walk a path between Glenbeigh and Glencar to come home on weekends to see her family. Her home and that path are now part of what is known as the 'Kerry Way.' I have long wanted to retrace her footsteps as a way to commune with her experience, and I was delighted that my wife, one of her sons, and a granddaughter wanted to join me. So here you go, I took a walk today on the Kerry Way...


      Kathleen exploring her mother's childhood home on the Kerry Way, Glencar, Co. Kerry. This was our starting point. It was hard to get a measure of the distance traveled, but it was something like 5-6 miles. Not far, but for a 14 year old girl hiking alone over the low mountain pass it must have seemed far. Days are short here in the winter, so I imagine there were times it was done in the dark.


      This part of the Kerry Way starts out with some road walking on a single lane country road.


      It is all uphill at first. This is looking back towards Glencar.


      The spring lambs are so cute I could just eat them up :)
      The landscape as hardly changed since my mother-in-law was a little girl so we really felt the connection with her experience on this walk.


      The path diverges here. We felt confident that she took the more direct (but steeper) route through 'The Windy Gap.'

      Windy gap lived up to its name; It was cool and windy. As you crest the hill it reveals a delightful view of your destination of Glenbeigh.



      My wife walking towards Glenbeigh.



      Admiring the view towards Dingle Bay.


      Some ruins entering Glenbeigh.

      It was a great walk. We had a great time.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • New

      Yes OMO, this was just a short section.

      The total length is over 120 miles long. It is (mostly) a loop, so you can end up where you started from.
      This is typically done as an inn-to-inn hike. There are companies that will sell you a 'package' with all the lodging and transfers of your luggage arranged so all you have to carry is a day pack.

      Expect rain :)


      S
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • New

      IMScotty wrote:

      Yes OMO, this was just a short section.

      The total length is over 120 miles long. It is (mostly) a loop, so you can end up where you started from.
      This is typically done as an inn-to-inn hike. There are companies that will sell you a 'package' with all the lodging and transfers of your luggage arranged so all you have to carry is a day pack.

      Expect rain :)


      S
      Sounds like the same arrangements you can make for thru hiking on Hadrian's Wall.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • New

      Not sure if this counts as a walk. Went to a park and walked the trail (0.4 miles, up and down 300 steps, round trip) to get to the beach. If you have seen the mivie Road to Perdition, the photo below was taken at the exact spot where To Hanks was shot (Oops, spoiler alert). It couldn't be a better beach day. No clouds, calm wind and surf, 88 deg air and 60's water temp, beach "packed" with 20 people. After some swimming and beach walking, I read some the book I got for Father's Day, Northbound With Theo, an AT hiking book by a 75 year old retired lawyer (trail name SoJo) who thru hiked in 2016 with his Golden Retriever Theo. Afterwards we drove into town to have appetizers and cocktails on the deck with a view of the channel, lake, and lighthouse. We then checked out the art fair on main street with a corn dog.



    • New

      OK, I really took this walk a week ago, but here are a few photos of my visit to Skellig Michael. Skellig Michael is an island off the coast of Kerry. Monks built a hermitage on this inaccessible island around 500-600 AD. It takes a bit of luck to get here, and you are only given 1.5 hours to explore before your boat departs. It is one of the most magical places I have ever been.

      Skellig Michael: Star Wars fans might recognize this island has Luke Skywalker's secrete retreat.


      A very tricky boat landing. We were the first boat on the island in over a week. You have to be lucky!


      You climb the many stone stairs the monks built to get to the top.

      The monk's 'Beehive Cells.'

      Graves. Vikings would periodically plunder the island and carry monks away.


      'Little Skellig' island is seen in the distance.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier