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Took a walk today

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    • Took a walk today



      Your daughter is lucky to have you for a dad. I bet you've taught her a lot about nature and the outdoors.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Re:Re: Took a walk today

      TrafficJam wrote:



      Your daughter is lucky to have you for a dad. I bet you've taught her a lot about nature and the outdoors.


      Daughters rock!
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:


      Daughters rock!


      I took my daughter backpacking for a weekend on North Manitou Island a few years ago. I think the second pic is taken where I got a near fatal case of poison ivy (well maybe not "near fatal", but it did take a trip to the Dr. and steroids to clear up).

      [IMG:https://scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/t1.0-9/6134_270264390594_6657129_n.jpg]

      [IMG:https://scontent-b-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xap1/t1.0-9/6134_270264450594_3188325_n.jpg]

      [IMG:https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/t1.0-9/6134_270264500594_5163816_n.jpg]
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      OMO, I will be there soon and want to spend one night on the island. You took the ferry from Fishtown, right? Where did you camp? What trails did you hike?


      As far as I know there is only one ferry and yes it is from the port (Fishtown) in Leland. You should reserve a spot in advance and be sure to get there on time as they will leave without you and there's only one boat per day.

      [IMG:http://www.nps.gov/slbe/planyourvisit/images/NMI_map.gif]

      The boat drops you off by the ranger station (NE side). Before you can get your permit, you must listen to the Ranger orientation talk, learn about not taking anything off or leaving anything behind, camping rules, etc... There may be a dire warning about the microbears (chipmunks). We then hiked down the east side trail, past the cemetary, to the Bourniques homestead.

      [IMG:https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/t1.0-9/6134_270264385594_5186194_n.jpg]

      From there we cut through the trees to the beach and took a break (that is where the first pic on my last post was taken). From there, we followed the beach toward Dimmick's Point. You cut across the point to avoid the Piping Plover nesting area. We continued following the beach to Donner's Point and then up the west coast. Along here there were some spots where the dunes drop to about the water edge. There were a couple of trees right at the waterline where you had choose between scrambling up dune a few feet to go above the tree or wade out into the lake to go below the tree. Just before you get to the point where the trail coming in from the NE reaches to shore (where it says The Cable Box), the dunes level out. Here we scrambled up the bank (maybe 20 feet of loose sand) to get to a partially clear area (probably on old farm field) that follows the shore up to the Fredrickson Place. There were several good camping places where the inland edge of the filed met for trees, maybe 50 yards from the beach. This is the view from the camping area, looking SW toward S Manitou.

      [IMG:https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/t1.0-9/6134_270264435594_991374_n.jpg]

      After setting up camp we hike up the field about a 1/4 mile to the Fredrickson place to make sure we could find the trail. It was almost dark at this point and there were no other people camping here so were were fairly confident we had the entire southern tip of the island to ourselves. The next day we met some people at the Village Campground who said pretty much everyone else on our boat took the trail West to Swensons and there were a lot of people camped there. The next morning we hiked up the west side, up the Old Grade (this is where all the wildflowers and poison ivy were). We took a break at Stormer Camp. On a short side trail there is a junk yard with some cool old wrecks.
      [IMG:https://scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xap1/t1.0-9/6134_270264470594_3816110_n.jpg]

      We followed the trail to the NE coast at the John Maleski place. There were a lot of blackberries in the field there. We followed the coat trail back toward the dock. On this trail we saw a dear up close and a large Hawk in the bushes right off the trail who stuck out one wing and hissed at us. I think he must have been protecting his lunch. We camped at the Village Campground for our second night (no reservations - first come first served). This is the only designated camping area - the rest of the island had dispersed camping. I think there were two other groups there. We chatted around the campfire ring. This put us close to the dock so we could sleep in and still catch the ferry home the next morning (again, don't miss it or you get an extra day on the island). If you are only spending one night, you may want to camp near the dock and do most of your hiking on the day you arrive. You could maybe hike west from the dock to Swanson's, then around the south tip of the island and camp near Bourniques (there were some nice open areas near the beach there). That would put you about 3 miles from the dock. Most people camp close to the beach as this is your only source of water, except for the one inland lake (Lk Manitou) and the faucet in the Village near the campground.
    • Thank you for the great trip report. I've been wanting to hike on the island for years but it never works out.

      I've eaten at the Early Bird and another restaurant on the dock. I'll try the Bluebird this year.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Where is Leland, Minnesota??


      Michigan. The Manitou Islands are part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in the northwest part of the lower peninsula. There are two islands offshore near the town of Leland MI. South Manitou is smaller, but was a bit more developed because it had a better harbor. On S Manitou you must camp at designated campgrounds. North Manitou is designated as wilderness, except for the small area around the dock where there is the campground and ranger station.

      abcnews.go.com/Travel/best_pla…mericas/story?id=14319616
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Where is Leland, Minnesota??


      odd man out wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Where is Leland, Minnesota??


      Michigan. The Manitou Islands are part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in the northwest part of the lower peninsula. There are two islands offshore near the town of Leland MI. South Manitou is smaller, but was a bit more developed because it had a better harbor. On S Manitou you must camp at designated campgrounds. North Manitou is designated as wilderness, except for the small area around the dock where there is the campground and ranger station.

      abcnews.go.com/Travel/best_pla…mericas/story?id=14319616


      It's the best place to vacation. There is no heat, traffic, noise, crowds, or fast food. There's hiking, biking, kayaking, swimming, fishing, relaxing, and beer drinking. The weather is always cool and perfect.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Today I took a walk at Haw Ridge Park in Oak Ridge. Oak Ridge is also known as The Secret City. It's where the atomic bomb was developed.


      youtube.com/watch?v=QWNSPCq-_hc -- is there a way to embed video in the new software?


      Just copy and paste it into the reply area.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Today I had one of the most interesting hikes I've ever been on. I originally planned to hike from Newfound Gap to Clingman's Dome and back, a total of 16 miles. After two nights of insomnia, I was dragging and didn't get to Newfound Gap until 10. I still had several options for the hike. I could hike to Mt. Collins Shelter and back for 10 mi, hike to Clingman's Dome and hitch back for 8 mi, or turn around whenever I felt like it.

      As usual, I forgot something and this time it was my hiking poles. A little worried, I started hiking and was surprised that it felt easier without the poles. On the steep parts where I have trouble, it was easier to put my hands on the ground for leverage or to grab roots and limbs.

      By 12:15, I had hiked 4.5 mi and was at the junction of the AT and Mt. Collins Shelter where I sat and ate my lunch. While I was sitting there trying to decide what to do, an unusual man walked up and sat down. He wasn't your typical hiker. I didn't judge him on his lack of footwear or the quality of his gear, but his mannerisms were off and it was obvious he wasn't quite right mentally. My gut told me he was harmless but my brain was wondering where I stashed the pepper spray. After bumming some food from me, he headed off towards NFG. That made my decision easy, I was going to Clingman's Dome.


      I was at CD by 2:45 and made the obligatory walk up the dome. It was really crowded so I didn't linger. I walked to the parking lot and hitched a ride with a nice couple from Dallas. They were interesting to talk to and I think I gave them a few minutes of entertainment.
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      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • Do you know if he is he still on trail? That looks like him in the face but the guy I met probably weighed 190. He wouldn't tell me his name when I asked. He said he walks barefoot or in flip flops and was wearing flip flops when I saw him.


      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • This guy seemed to be physically healthy and had a blanket and sleeping pad. He asked me about shelters and I gave him the mileage to the next shelter. I had eaten all my food but found a Cliff Bar and gave it to him. He was friendly but asked me a lot of questions in an interrogation style and wouldn't answer any of mine. I didn't feel threatened at all, just wary.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I believe people have the right to privacy, should I delete these last posts? Maybe he doesn't want anyone to know where he is.

      i just read on TOS that there was speculation that he was near clingmans dome
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • He sounds a little creepy. I'm glad nothing happened. Last year on my LASH from springer I ran into 2 strange ones. One called "Flipper" because he walked up and down the trail in both directions never leaving the Franklin/Haiwasse area apparently living off the trail magic. The other was "Wickin Witch" a guy who also look homeless and hiked shelter to shelter and talked a big talk about how much money and stuff he had when it was obvious he was homeless by the "gear" he had.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • did a 10 mile day hike from 3 forks to hawk mountain shelter and back (plus a little detour) here in ga. hawk mountain shelter was spotless; last time i was there it was a pigsty so props to the gatc. water at hawk is good. forest service road to hickory flatt cemetary closed for repair.checked the fs website and see that it should be reopened in a couple weeks.
      2,000 miler
    • Well I am on the fence on this thread.. Just as High School had a bunch of nerds and creepy people, jocks, and the coach/teacher who was having great sex with the teen blond with a dynamite figure. Not much is different when on the trail... Hey they all had issues with alcohol, drugs, and sex. We are all adults here, Just do your best. As for Paul - I hope he finds god -I don't expect HD video, clearly he left it behind, and we don't need proof... unless he runs into a big wookie...then we need video... right now.

      If he turns up in Venezuela... I will be very angry. :D
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • Walks? Is that what the thread's about? I'm fairly achin' to do a few days on the AT or LT, but life's gotten a bit strange lately -- unemployed, looking for work, interviews, recruiters, wondering if in fact I might be retired or semi-retired. Burned out on the cubicle world. Age-wise I'm in the upper 2 percentile of my peers. Getting too old for this sh!t.

      So I've done a bunch of day hikes in the Whites, probably every 2nd or 3rd weekend, with a woman I met on VFTT (Views From The Top) who happens to be a friend-of-a-friend. Whiteface, Liberty, Tripyramid, Moosilauke. She's a peakbagger, strictly a day-hiker. Has to get back to her cat. (Don't ask.) But a good hiking companion... we move at about the same speed.

      I'm determined to finish the LT this summer or fall. What's left is the 63 miles between Rte. 108 and Canada, in other words, the toughest and most remote section of the LT. From what I've read, and from what I've seen so far of the northern LT, I expect to be moving at 1 mph through this section, so I'm figuring five days should do it. Have to figure out how to take a week's "vacation" while collecting unemployment.

      I did a total of 3 miles on the AT near Hopewell Junction this weekend. The same 1.5 mile section both ways. We rebuilt a plank-walk over a small gully. Then we went over and worked on that stone staircase (Coach Lou's thread.) This was all part of the RPH Cabin work weekend. Good clean fun.
    • rafe wrote:

      Walks? Is that what the thread's about? I'm fairly achin' to do a few days on the AT or LT, but life's gotten a bit strange lately -- unemployed, looking for work, interviews, recruiters, wondering if in fact I might be retired or semi-retired. Burned out on the cubicle world. Age-wise I'm in the upper 2 percentile of my peers. Getting too old for this sh!t.

      So I've done a bunch of day hikes in the Whites, probably every 2nd or 3rd weekend, with a woman I met on VFTT (Views From The Top) who happens to be a friend-of-a-friend. Whiteface, Liberty, Tripyramid, Moosilauke. She's a peakbagger, strictly a day-hiker. Has to get back to her cat. (Don't ask.) But a good hiking companion... we move at about the same speed.

      I'm determined to finish the LT this summer or fall. What's left is the 63 miles between Rte. 108 and Canada, in other words, the toughest and most remote section of the LT. From what I've read, and from what I've seen so far of the northern LT, I expect to be moving at 1 mph through this section, so I'm figuring five days should do it. Have to figure out how to take a week's "vacation" while collecting unemployment.

      I did a total of 3 miles on the AT near Hopewell Junction this weekend. The same 1.5 mile section both ways. We rebuilt a plank-walk over a small gully. Then we went over and worked on that stone staircase (Coach Lou's thread.) This was all part of the RPH Cabin work weekend. Good clean fun.


      I wish I had an opportunity to see these places that ya'll talk about. Maybe one day.

      I'm aching to get in the woods too. If I'm lucky, I will get to do an overnight this week. Keep your fingers crossed.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Took a walk yesterday - Peekamoose and Table Mountain, starting from the Peekamoose trailhead because I'm a glutton for punishment. 9.7 miles (I include an extra bit of roadwalk because the trailhead parking was full), just under 3000 feet of elevation gained (and, obviously, lost again since I got back to the car). Some scrambling, nothing too sketchy. Saw the biggest snowshoe hare I've ever seen. The view was a little different, looking down on the 'Gunks. Trip report later, too much stuff going on to write one when I got home.
      I'm not lost. I know where I am. I'm right here.
    • Been taking a walk every day. Practice for Annie and I starting the Camino Frances from St Jean Pied de Port in France to Santiago de Compestella in Spain. We start on the 4th September (flying out of Perth on 2nd September).
      For those not following us on FBook below is a link to Annie's trail journal which will be updated regularly.
      trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=17489
      Resident Australian, proving being a grumpy old man is not just an American trait.