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Took a walk today

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    • Every year my wife and I take a fall weekend trip up to the area around Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. It usually involves some walks (not so much hikes). This year we walked up to the overlook on Whaleback (a local nature conservancy property). From a few hundred feet up you look down into the lake and across the passage to N and S Manitou Islands. Then we walked to some beaches near point Oneida. It was pretty crowded as you can see due to the spectacular weather.

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    • Did some interesting walking/hiking this weekend.

      I spent a couple of hours and maybe 4 miles walking around the Epic Systems campus in Verona, WI. I didn't take pics because I had no idea and left the cellphone in the car. To put it simply, it is the largest, weirdest, craziest, most expensive piece of ego stroking I've ever seen. Judy Faulkner has so much money, she can't spend it all in what's left of her life. So, she indulges herself. Completely. And, it is quite simply DisneyWorld of corporate HQ's. And, I'm not kidding. While I was there not one, but two, Semi-Trucks were devoted to pumping out the underground.....food grease storage tanks that are fed from pipes throughout the crazy ass campus from it's dining areas, including a gigantic dining hall that is...the train station from Harry Potter. To scale. The HQ is the size of a Big Ten university campus. There is almost as much space underground as above ground. The buildings are the most bizarre part. Many of them are...wait for it...plucked straight from Harry Potter books. Then there is the Alice in Wonderland section. Not kidding.

      atlasobscura.com/places/epiccampus

      Yesterday I did some excellent real hiking at Devils Lake SP, WI. Great red/purple and grey quartzite formations in the Baraboo Range, some of the oldest exposed rock in all of US at 1.6 billions years old. Great scrambling and climbing. Picturesque lake. A portion of the Ice Age Trail runs through here. About 6 miles of hiking/scrambling in great weather with great friends made for a great day! Really spectacular scenery and hiking here.

      iceagetrail.org/wp-content/upl…-Sample-Baraboo-Hills.pdf


      :D :D
    • ScareBear wrote:

      Did some interesting walking/hiking this weekend.

      I spent a couple of hours and maybe 4 miles walking around the Epic Systems campus in Verona, WI. I didn't take pics because I had no idea and left the cellphone in the car. To put it simply, it is the largest, weirdest, craziest, most expensive piece of ego stroking I've ever seen. Judy Faulkner has so much money, she can't spend it all in what's left of her life. So, she indulges herself. Completely. And, it is quite simply DisneyWorld of corporate HQ's. And, I'm not kidding. While I was there not one, but two, Semi-Trucks were devoted to pumping out the underground.....food grease storage tanks that are fed from pipes throughout the crazy ass campus from it's dining areas, including a gigantic dining hall that is...the train station from Harry Potter. To scale. The HQ is the size of a Big Ten university campus. There is almost as much space underground as above ground. The buildings are the most bizarre part. Many of them are...wait for it...plucked straight from Harry Potter books. Then there is the Alice in Wonderland section. Not kidding.

      atlasobscura.com/places/epiccampus

      Yesterday I did some excellent real hiking at Devils Lake SP, WI. Great red/purple and grey quartzite formations in the Baraboo Range, some of the oldest exposed rock in all of US at 1.6 billions years old. Great scrambling and climbing. Picturesque lake. A portion of the Ice Age Trail runs through here. About 6 miles of hiking/scrambling in great weather with great friends made for a great day! Really spectacular scenery and hiking here.

      iceagetrail.org/wp-content/upl…-Sample-Baraboo-Hills.pdf


      :D :D
      Thanks for reporting on your walk in Verona. My daughter was a Harry Potter fanatic growing up so I will have to take her there. I'm also interested in seeing it and comparing to the Big Ten university campuses that I've been to. Somehow, I have a hard time believing there is as much property as Michigan State has.
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Took a walk near Albuquerque, knew I shoulda made a left turn.

      Started off in a desert environment at 6400 ft, climbed through three temperate zones, and ended up at 9400 ft. 3000 ft gain over 4.7 mi. From the beginning, I was short of breath and dizzy, then got nauseous. Because I only had a slight headache, figured the symptoms were from the extra glass of wine the night before, or maybe food poisoning. I didn't realize nausea was a symptom of altitude sickness. Felt better after turning around and heading down. After the hike, my arms hurt from shoulders to elbows but have no idea why. This morning they are fine.

      I loved seeing the cacti, sage, and mesquite at the lower elevation and the beautiful aspen and pine trees higher up. Beautiful environment.
      when I fly into Johnson Bell, Missoula Mt. from Long Island sound, I land at 3200 feet. Everything from there is up. I am whoosy, stuffed up and sinuses are draining bad...... on the third day I can breath, it is heaven.
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup:
    • Coach

      72 hours is the normal time to overcome altitude sickness. When I guided, our summer camp was about 7,800' and one of the lakes we fished was around 10,000'.


      We did this lake on the third day of the week to give the clients time to adjust a little to the altitude. Fortunately most of the clients came into town the a day or two before we left for camp so they had already "started adjusting" to the altitude.
      The will of God will never take you where the grace of God will not protect you.
    • Trillium wrote:

      ScareBear wrote:

      Did some interesting walking/hiking this weekend.

      I spent a couple of hours and maybe 4 miles walking around the Epic Systems campus in Verona, WI. I didn't take pics because I had no idea and left the cellphone in the car. To put it simply, it is the largest, weirdest, craziest, most expensive piece of ego stroking I've ever seen. Judy Faulkner has so much money, she can't spend it all in what's left of her life. So, she indulges herself. Completely. And, it is quite simply DisneyWorld of corporate HQ's. And, I'm not kidding. While I was there not one, but two, Semi-Trucks were devoted to pumping out the underground.....food grease storage tanks that are fed from pipes throughout the crazy ass campus from it's dining areas, including a gigantic dining hall that is...the train station from Harry Potter. To scale. The HQ is the size of a Big Ten university campus. There is almost as much space underground as above ground. The buildings are the most bizarre part. Many of them are...wait for it...plucked straight from Harry Potter books. Then there is the Alice in Wonderland section. Not kidding.

      atlasobscura.com/places/epiccampus

      Yesterday I did some excellent real hiking at Devils Lake SP, WI. Great red/purple and grey quartzite formations in the Baraboo Range, some of the oldest exposed rock in all of US at 1.6 billions years old. Great scrambling and climbing. Picturesque lake. A portion of the Ice Age Trail runs through here. About 6 miles of hiking/scrambling in great weather with great friends made for a great day! Really spectacular scenery and hiking here.

      iceagetrail.org/wp-content/upl…-Sample-Baraboo-Hills.pdf


      :D :D
      Thanks for reporting on your walk in Verona. My daughter was a Harry Potter fanatic growing up so I will have to take her there. I'm also interested in seeing it and comparing to the Big Ten university campuses that I've been to. Somehow, I have a hard time believing there is as much property as Michigan State has.
      When you take away the residence halls and dorms, and consider the vastness of the underground square footage, it has to be close in size, as far as interior square footage is concerned. Also, you have to remember that Judy Faulker is a bit..odd....instead of an 11,000 seat arena sitting above ground, her's sits FIVE STORIES BELOW GROUND. That's right. FIVE STORIES BELOW GROUND. You have no idea you are walking on top of it. Almost 98 percent of the parking is hidden underground. There is an extensive underground tunnel network that links all buildings. All utilities are underground, including waste removal, water treatment, waste water treatment, recycling, heating, power and cooling. And supplies via deliveries are made underground. Above ground is Disney World. Seriously. You can't appreciate it's vastness until you realize all you are seeing is what Judy wants you to see...her own weird Nirvana. 10,000 people spend 8 hours a day there...it is freaking huge. I heard she designed the size of the Epic logo on top of the main building to be read from outer space...their address is Milky Way Drive...that should give you an idea of her mind...
    • I finally took a walk today for the first time in what feels like forever. It almost never works out that my husband and I both have a weekend free at the same time and that the weather is pleasant to boot. Aside from the fact that I've had some kind of upper respiratory crap going on for the last week and I probably coughed enough to scare off any wildlife within earshot, it was a great day.

      We hit up a few local trails. One was a super short, approximately 1.25 mile end to end with key hole loops at either end, paved, nature trail with informational signs. The other was a trailhead that splits off in to a few different ones that start out through a high meadow and then either descend to follow a creek, go up a hillside to an overlook or climb to a couple of different 6,000-7,000 foot peaks. Since it was later in the day and the sun was right in our faces the whole time, we just walked until we got tired of squinting and then turned around. You can't tell from the pictures but yesterday everything was covered in snow. Any time we got in the treeline, there were still pockets of snow and some really thick mud. I don't think I would have made it the extra 1,600ish feet to the peaks anyway since I sound like I'm breathing through one lung. :)

      All in all, it was a nice couple of hours in the sunshine and fresh air with my husband.


      “Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” - T. S. Eliot
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Ewok, those are some great photos, you've got a good eye for picture taking.
      Do you use a camera or are they just from a phone?
      Hope you feel better soon.
      Thank you! I have a Nikon D3100 camera. I have no idea what I'm doing with it half the time but sometimes I get really lucky and the picture just kind of takes itself.
      “Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” - T. S. Eliot
    • Rasty wrote:

      uncle meat wrote:

      Most cell phones today take good pictures, but they are no substitute for fine equipment that takes fantastic pictures...night and day differences.
      The best equipment in the world is useless without a good photographic eye
      And that is why I don't take or post that many pictures. And be married to a semi-professional photographer does not help.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Just wanted to recommend a short walk in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire that I think gives the most bang-for-the-buck in the area. The Table Rock trail is just 0.3 miles, pretty much straight up, short and sweet. I even got my wife to join me. The views from the top are spectacular.






      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier

      The post was edited 1 time, last by IMScotty ().

    • IMScotty wrote:

      Just wanted to recommend a short walk in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire that I think gives the most bang-for-the-buck in the area. The Table Rock trail is just 0.3 miles, pretty much straight up, short and sweet. I even got my wife to join me. The views from the top are spectacular.







      8o Don't tell us that you hiked all those three tenths of a mile in blue jeans and a tee shirt!!!!!!!!
      You could have died from hiking in those clothes...lol :D
    • LIhikers wrote:

      IMScotty wrote:

      Just wanted to recommend a short walk in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire that I think gives the most bang-for-the-buck in the area. The Table Rock trail is just 0.3 miles, pretty much straight up, short and sweet. I even got my wife to join me. The views from the top are spectacular.







      8o Don't tell us that you hiked all those three tenths of a mile in blue jeans and a tee shirt!!!!!!!!You could have died from hiking in those clothes...lol :D
      Cof124
    • LIhikers wrote:

      IMScotty wrote:

      Just wanted to recommend a short walk in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire that I think gives the most bang-for-the-buck in the area. The Table Rock trail is just 0.3 miles, pretty much straight up, short and sweet. I even got my wife to join me. The views from the top are spectacular.







      8o Don't tell us that you hiked all those three tenths of a mile in blue jeans and a tee shirt!!!!!!!!You could have died from hiking in those clothes...lol :D
      I was lucky I made it out alive. I also did not carry a flashlight with me and I just found out in another thread that it gets dark at night. Who knew?
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • sciatica update: stretching really hasn't helped much - some small improvement that quite frankly could have come with just the passage of time. still doing the stretches every day to increase core strenght.

      have had 3 sessions of traction -- and yesterday walked 14 minutes without pain. doesn't sound like much -- but my previous best was only 5 minutes. so i think we are now on the right track.
      2,000 miler
    • max.patch wrote:

      sciatica update: stretching really hasn't helped much - some small improvement that quite frankly could have come with just the passage of time. still doing the stretches every day to increase core strenght.

      have had 3 sessions of traction -- and yesterday walked 14 minutes without pain. doesn't sound like much -- but my previous best was only 5 minutes. so i think we are now on the right track.
      At least there is progress. :)
      Hopefully it starts growing exponentially (instead of just a linear progression).
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Me, Kathy, and our dog Tora went for a 6 mile walk in New York City's Alley Pond Park.
      We followed 3 different trails, white, blue and red. The only problem was that there were red trails everywhere and not all of them are attached to each other. The only thing I can think of is that the orange trail was mismarked or the color of the marking discs had faded to red. In any case we survived and found our way back to the car.
      It was a beautiful day and the temperature was just about perfect. Just a little cooler would have been better.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Me, Kathy, and our dog Tora went for a 6 mile walk in New York City's Alley Pond Park.
      We followed 3 different trails, white, blue and red. The only problem was that there were red trails everywhere and not all of them are attached to each other. The only thing I can think of is that the orange trail was mismarked or the color of the marking discs had faded to red. In any case we survived and found our way back to the car.
      It was a beautiful day and the temperature was just about perfect. Just a little cooler would have been better.
      and that’s fine until you separate, call each other on the telephone and swear up and down you’re on the red trail and keep missing each other.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Me, Kathy, and our dog Tora went for a 6 mile walk in New York City's Alley Pond Park.
      We followed 3 different trails, white, blue and red. The only problem was that there were red trails everywhere and not all of them are attached to each other. The only thing I can think of is that the orange trail was mismarked or the color of the marking discs had faded to red. In any case we survived and found our way back to the car.
      It was a beautiful day and the temperature was just about perfect. Just a little cooler would have been better.
      Had a similar experience with my wife and 3 sons about 10 years ago turning a 5 mile hike into a 10 mile one. :rolleyes:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Kathy and I went out and took a walk on one of the local suburban trails. We did something we don't normally do and used 2 cars so we'd only have to walk one way, about 6 miles. We even got lucky and got to the car at the finish just as the rain started. Drove back to pick up the other car and then we went to the closest Dunkin Donuts for coffee and hot chocolate.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Kathy and I went out and took a walk on one of the local suburban trails. We did something we don't normally do and used 2 cars so we'd only have to walk one way, about 6 miles. We even got lucky and got to the car at the finish just as the rain started. Drove back to pick up the other car and then we went to the closest Dunkin Donuts for coffee and hot chocolate.
      I did that once with my wife, left her car at one of the Battle Road Trail in Concord, MA, and started walking from my car at the other. So when we got to the end of our several mile walk I pulled the keys out of my pocket for her car and discovered... I had brought the wrong set of keys :(



      She sat and baked in the hot sun while I started on my seven mile jog back to the other car.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Kathy and I went out and took a walk on one of the local suburban trails. We did something we don't normally do and used 2 cars so we'd only have to walk one way, about 6 miles. We even got lucky and got to the car at the finish just as the rain started. Drove back to pick up the other car and then we went to the closest Dunkin Donuts for coffee and hot chocolate.
      I did that once with my wife, left her car at one of the Battle Road Trail in Concord, MA, and started walking from my car at the other. So when we got to the end of our several mile walk I pulled the keys out of my pocket for her car and discovered... I had brought the wrong set of keys :(


      She sat and baked in the hot sun while I started on my seven mile jog back to the other car.
      Definitely a hike she won't forget
      :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • IMScotty wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Kathy and I went out and took a walk on one of the local suburban trails. We did something we don't normally do and used 2 cars so we'd only have to walk one way, about 6 miles. We even got lucky and got to the car at the finish just as the rain started. Drove back to pick up the other car and then we went to the closest Dunkin Donuts for coffee and hot chocolate.
      I did that once with my wife, left her car at one of the Battle Road Trail in Concord, MA, and started walking from my car at the other. So when we got to the end of our several mile walk I pulled the keys out of my pocket for her car and discovered... I had brought the wrong set of keys :(


      She sat and baked in the hot sun while I started on my seven mile jog back to the other car.
      Does she still hike with you ? ...lol
    • IMScotty wrote:

      I did that once with my wife, left her car at one of the Battle Road Trail in Concord, MA, and started walking from my car at the other. So when we got to the end of our several mile walk I pulled the keys out of my pocket for her car and discovered... I had brought the wrong set of keys :(


      She sat and baked in the hot sun while I started on my seven mile jog back to the other car.
      Embarrassed to admit it but I did even worse.

      When I was a Troop Leader for the Boy Scouts I was taking the troop on a weekend hike to a cabin in a forest on private property. The owners of the property were very supportive of the troop and allowed scouts to use their cabin.

      Since I had never been there before and there wasn’t a map I inquired about directions. Two of the older scouts said they had been there and it was very easy to find – we just had to follow the old logging roads. We all met at the trail head and started off on the hike with the two “seasoned” scouts leading. After taking a few lefts and rights and hiking for a couple of hours we popped out into a nice clearing just as darkness was settling in. Right where the cars were parked !With darkness closing in and no idea where the cabin really was I piled the scouts into my van and brought them to my house and started making calls to the parents. Thankfully the parents were understanding even though I am sure some of them had a good laugh. I did get accurate directions and a few weeks later we did the hike again and actually found the cabin easily.


      At our banquet, the scouts who had been on the first hike, received the “Circle Award”. It was a round wooden curtain rod hanger that my wife and I had decorated. Each scout and their parents we called up and presented the award as a thanks for being so good natured about the whole thing.
      The will of God will never take you where the grace of God will not protect you.
    • I went on a walk today, unintentionally. Taking advantage of 60* and sunny skies, I took my bike out for a ride. 3 miles in, my back tube went flat. I changed it on the side of the highway without any problem but the spare wouldn't hold air and it leaked from the bottom of the valve.

      I was close to a busy, I 40 exit with a truck stop and had to get through a big intersection with no shoulder. I don't know if it was the right decision, but I rode slowly through the intersection until I got to a good place to walk. I'm really worried about my rim.

      The walk was mostly along the lake and was pleasant. Treated myself to a caramel macchiato (with two pumps of vanilla) as consolation. :)
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Riding on a flat usually doesn’t harm the rim if you avoid sharply edged rocks and potholes.

      Kudos for having the items necessary to repair a flat roadside.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Dan76 wrote:

      Riding on a flat usually doesn’t harm the rim if you avoid sharply edged rocks and potholes.



      Kudos for having the items necessary to repair a flat roadside.
      Thank you, that makes me feel better.

      I always carry a spare tube. This is my 2nd flat in the past month...different wheel.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis