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Sleeping Bag

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    • Sleeping Bag

      I’m in the market for a cold-weather bag...Southeast cold. I want a down bag able to tolerate humidity.

      Realistically, the coldest I’d probably camp is 12-15* but need to be prepared to go down to 0-5*, just in case my planning sucks, which is usually the case. :)

      I’ve read that the recommendation is to get a bag 15-20* colder than what you need. Plus I’m a ‘cold sleeper’.

      I’m looking at a Western Mountaineering Apache, 15* with 2oz of overfill which supposedly adds 8-10* to the bag. A Feathered Friends Petrel 10^, and a Western Mountaineering Antelope 5* with 2 oz of overfill,

      I’m 5’1/2”. The Apache comes in a 5’6” size. The Petrel 10 small is 5’3”, and the Antelope is 5’6” but is wider/more girth.

      I’ve also read that the more extra space, the colder the bag,

      So far, the Apache with overfill is in the lead, followed by the Petrel, then the Antelope,

      Or should I go for the warmest bag on the list, the Antelope with overfill ? Ugh! I hate decisions.


      westernmountaineering.com/prod…bags-specification-chart/


      featheredfriends.com/petrel-ul-womens-down-sleeping-bag.html
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • In cooler temps, I sleep on my Prolite Plus short and Z lite sol. The Prolite Plus, r value is 3.4, the
      Z lite sol is 2.6, giving me a toasty 6. Knock off a bit sleeping cold and 5.5 should be adequate.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • One option other than buying a new bag is to layer two bags. Two bags might be the same warmth as the Apache.

      Here’s my convoluted thinking and sketchy math.

      My DIY Apex Climashield quilt is rated at 30* so I’ll add 10 to that for sleeping cold.

      The Roxy Ann 15* bag is more realistically 30*.

      70-[(70-40)+(70-30)]

      = 0*

      Not sure I believe it so will add 10* and go with the more realistic number of 15*. ;)
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • But the thing that sucks about using the two bags mentioned above, is their weight and the space they will occupy in my pack.
      Images
      • 782EA29E-6353-40F8-87EF-339B0561693F.jpeg

        80.59 kB, 361×600, viewed 12 times
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Sooooo....the 15* Apache with overfill sounds like the best decision to me. I don’t believe the overfill will add 8-10*, so I’ll go with 5*. That would give me some leeway if the shyte hits the fan.

      Hey! Thanks for helping me work all this out. :)
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Never bought anything lower than 20*, and no expert at cold weather bags.
      But FWIW I have been happy with my Western Mountaineering HiLite. WM has quality gear, the only down side is the price, and unlike some other gear, you seldom see any on sale.
      Bottom line, gear to keep you warm in cold weather is usually a good investment, as it extends your hiking seasons and helps you enjoy it more. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • You also asked about the width of a bag and I will say for myself, I always appreciate some extra girth. I want enough so that I can still roll around inside and get comfortable, even though it means I will have to heat that extra space. Keep in mind that when winter camping you might be wearing some clothing and a puffy jacket to bed also, and will be glad to have that extra space. I need it anyway.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • Yep, by wearing warm clothing I can use my 25 degree Montbell down bag into the teens.
      And like others have said, having a good, insulating ground pad is very important, or use multiple pads. Foam under an inflatable works well.
      I've heard it said that you should have at least an R value of 5 and my experience proves that out. My NeoAir All Season pad is about 5 if I remember right.

      Put together what you think will work in the cold and then sleep out in the yard to try it out.
      That way if you aren't warm enough you can just go inside instead of enduring a cold, miserable night.
    • Astro wrote:

      Never bought anything lower than 20*, and no expert at cold weather bags.
      But FWIW I have been happy with my Western Mountaineering HiLite. WM has quality gear, the only down side is the price, and unlike some other gear, you seldom see any on sale.
      Bottom line, gear to keep you warm in cold weather is usually a good investment, as it extends your hiking seasons and helps you enjoy it more. :)
      I was sort of scared away from the extremelite bags as I read the fabric doesn’t take a lot of beating.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • SandyofPA wrote:

      I have the Western Mountaineering Antelope, as a side sleeper the width allows me to pull my knees up to stay real warm. I pair it with an X-Therm.
      Good point, I sleep the same...on my side with knees up. I worried the extra space would make me feel colder.

      Sandy, for what temp range do you use the Antelope? I’d like to use it up to 30’s, at least.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • IMScotty wrote:

      You also asked about the width of a bag and I will say for myself, I always appreciate some extra girth. I want enough so that I can still roll around inside and get comfortable, even though it means I will have to heat that extra space. Keep in mind that when winter camping you might be wearing some clothing and a puffy jacket to bed also, and will be glad to have that extra space. I need it anyway.
      For some reason, I don’t toss and turn as much as I used to and can sleep in one position for much longer than previously. But there’s still a concern that trying to turn and reposition in a narrower bag won’t be easy. So, you’re right, more girth might be a good thing.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      What are you using for a pad(s)? This time of year I always add a foam pad to my inflatable and Mai use a space blanket under all that
      I have one of those Dollar Store car windshield sun screens that are a thin layer of polystyrene with silver Mylar coating on both sides. I've wondered if something like that would do the same thing. The insulation is very thin, but as a supplement with the Mylar coating a heat reflector on both sides, I thought maybe it would work. I haven't camped out on a night cold enough to test it yet. I have used in for other things. Good as a sit pad, a floor for the vestibule, backpack back pad, and a wind block. The big silvery surface would make a dandy emergency signaling device too.
    • SandyofPA wrote:

      I have the Western Mountaineering Antelope, as a side sleeper the width allows me to pull my knees up to stay real warm. I pair it with an X-Therm.
      Following as I may also be in the market for a cold weather bag someday. I also like to sleep a fetal position. That's what I like about my quilt I use for warm weather conditions. But a lot of people don't recommend quilts for cold weather sleeping.
    • odd man out wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      What are you using for a pad(s)? This time of year I always add a foam pad to my inflatable and Mai use a space blanket under all that
      I have one of those Dollar Store car windshield sun screens that are a thin layer of polystyrene with silver Mylar coating on both sides. I've wondered if something like that would do the same thing. The insulation is very thin, but as a supplement with the Mylar coating a heat reflector on both sides, I thought maybe it would work. I haven't camped out on a night cold enough to test it yet. I have used in for other things. Good as a sit pad, a floor for the vestibule, backpack back pad, and a wind block. The big silvery surface would make a dandy emergency signaling device too.
      I think they would make a good supplement. I've seen hammockers use them.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • The Lost Ranger and Roxy Ann are great bags but they should have been marketed as 30*, not 15*. Mine has been great in higher altitude summer and spring temps.

      The sleeve is fantastic, my bag stays put even with my tossing and turning.

      But it’s time to push some boundaries.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • CoachLou wrote:

      14 years ago my Puma was a little more than that. Paul paid a lot more recently! You have helped me decide on a replacement for my Lost Ranger, which I’ve had one good nite sleep in. I just have to scrape up the 550 for the Alpinlite!
      What bag are you considering?

      Paul, as in Paul Mags?

      Holy shyte, I still can’t believe I bought a $600 sleeping bag. WTF! I’m definitely ready for the zombie apocalypse.

      Oh my, oh......my.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      The Lost Ranger and Roxy Ann are great bags but they should have been marketed as 30*, not 15*. Mine has been great in higher altitude summer and spring temps.

      The sleeve is fantastic, my bag stays put even with my tossing and turning.

      But it’s time to push some boundaries.
      The sleeve for the pad and pillow are it's only plus as far as I can tell. Yea, maybe 30. And it opens on the wrong side, the pad is a pain to get in when your tired. I think it is too heavy for it's temp rate. I just don't like it. I'm going to get the Alpinlite, and the Lost Ranger will go into the 'Non essential' gear closet.
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup:
    • Astro wrote:

      I believe Paul in Coach Lou's post is the male side of LIHikers. :)
      Yep, and I wish my Western Mountaineering Puma had only been $600.
      I've never been cold in the thing, not even in single digit temperatures.
      Once the money is spent you just have to forget about it or it will make you crazy.

      Now TJ, what kind of pad do you plan on using for cold weather camping?
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      I believe Paul in Coach Lou's post is the male side of LIHikers. :)
      Yep, and I wish my Western Mountaineering Puma had only been $600.I've never been cold in the thing, not even in single digit temperatures.
      Once the money is spent you just have to forget about it or it will make you crazy.

      Now TJ, what kind of pad do you plan on using for cold weather camping?
      For now, a thermarest prolite plus coupled with a thermarest z lite sol. It gives me an R of 6. I’ll upgrade one day.

      I read that the CCF pad should be in the center of the sleeping sandwich...the inflatable on bottom. Though I don’t know the reasoning. Does anyone know?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • CoachLou wrote:

      I got it cheap with a strange coffin shaped pad, from a hunter who never used it. The pad has to weigh 2 lbs. and it rolls up to the size and shape of a violin case!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      My Roxy Ann will still be a favorite for mid temps. I really do love it. But, if I could afford it, I’d upgrade the RA to a summerlite or megalite.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      CoachLou wrote:

      I got it cheap with a strange coffin shaped pad, from a hunter who never used it. The pad has to weigh 2 lbs. and it rolls up to the size and shape of a violin case!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      My Roxy Ann will still be a favorite for mid temps. I really do love it. But, if I could afford it, I’d upgrade the RA to a summerlite or megalite.
      I got an everlite this summer, to take when I go to the Huts in the whites, I now use it all summer and into the warm fall. A few weeks ago I beefed up the Ranger with it. I would say that the Alpinlite combined with the everlite would survive MLK with no problem. Let's say Overload ever wants to eat her cheesecake at MLK, I'll let her use the Puma!
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup:
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      I believe Paul in Coach Lou's post is the male side of LIHikers. :)
      Yep, and I wish my Western Mountaineering Puma had only been $600.I've never been cold in the thing, not even in single digit temperatures.Once the money is spent you just have to forget about it or it will make you crazy.

      Now TJ, what kind of pad do you plan on using for cold weather camping?
      For now, a thermarest prolite plus coupled with a thermarest z lite sol. It gives me an R of 6. I’ll upgrade one day.
      I read that the CCF pad should be in the center of the sleeping sandwich...the inflatable on bottom. Though I don’t know the reasoning. Does anyone know?
      An R value of 6 should be good.
      I put my foam pad under my inflatable pad to provide some puncture protection from the ground.
      It seems to work fine that way.
    • I've tried the foam pad on top and under my inflatable, and for me it's definitely warmer and feels better with the foam pad on top. However sometimes I bring the foam along in the summer and I'll put it under the inflatable because it will keep it from sliding around.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference