Welcome to the AppalachianTrailCafe.net!
Take a moment and register and then join the conversation

High blood pressure

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • High blood pressure

      At what blood pressure would you be willing to start taking medication? My family doctor started me on it about two years ago when my BP was about 140/90, she (only doctor I ever trusted) adopted a house full of children and gave up her private practice for a director position somewhere to have better hours with the family. With the medication I'm normally around 140/75, my new doctor started me on additional medication. After reading the side affects of both medications I'm considering stopping all of it. I read some doctor on the internet say he'd not medicate unless over 140/90....when I told my wife that she asked if he slept a Holiday Inn Express.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • the recently revised guidelines are to start treatment once BP hits 130/80 and i certainly wouldn't want to exceed those levels.

      i developed HBP in my mid 50's and have been on medication since then. i'm at 115/65 on medication and intend to stay there. no side effects for me. ultrasound at the time of diagnosis revealed very minor heart enlargement; nothing to be concerned about as long as BP stays controlled.
      2,000 miler
    • This last medication to make me pee more may have side affects for me, I'm already having a problem with severe muscle cramps at night, now starting during the day, which normally is caused by not enough fluid in your tissues, felt light headed and somewhat disoriented at the gym and had less energy, did have blood drawn for testing prior to gym that may have affected me. I'm thinking maybe at least wait until after the hike to start a medication with unknown results.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      This last medication to make me pee more may have side affects for me, I'm already having a problem with severe muscle cramps at night, now starting during the day, which normally is caused by not enough fluid in your tissues, felt light headed and somewhat disoriented at the gym and had less energy, did have blood drawn for testing prior to gym that may have affected me. I'm thinking maybe at least wait until after the hike to start a medication with unknown results.
      Was it Hydochlorothiadzide (water pill, diarectic, makes me pee every twenty minutes all damn day long if I’m drinking iced tea) use to cramp my calf’s, but then it leveled off as long as I keep my electrolytes up...basically just eat right, veggies, and limit my carb intake.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Socks ().

    • Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV

      The post was edited 1 time, last by SandyofPA ().

    • SandyofPA wrote:

      Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV
      Sounds like good advice! It has been working for me. At nearly 57 I still do not take any medicine. Carrying more weight than I (and my Doctor) would prefer, but otherwise it is working. :thumbup:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • SandyofPA wrote:

      Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV
      Would evening sun not work as well, morning sun would expose neighbors to sights that might scare them for life.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      SandyofPA wrote:

      Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV
      Would evening sun not work as well, morning sun would expose neighbors to sights that might scare them for life.
      Scare or scar? Or perhaps a little of both. :D
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      SandyofPA wrote:

      Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV
      Would evening sun not work as well, morning sun would expose neighbors to sights that might scare them for life.
      Scare or scar? Or perhaps a little of both. :D
      A lot of both.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Started taking meds about two years ago at about 140/90, which may have been a mistake, it stabilized at about 125/75, now it went to about 142/75, started the additional meds and it seems to go up a little, stopped drinking and it went up 20 points. Two things I see having changed...gained 10-12 pounds for the first time ever and started drinking more for the first time ever (yeah, right!). I stopped drinking for a few days and the BP goes into the 160's, read where this is to be expected, guess it's a good thing I taper back on drinking before I hit the trail because the 100 mile wilderness doesn't have many bars.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      Started taking meds about two years ago at about 140/90, which may have been a mistake, it stabilized at about 125/75, now it went to about 142/75, started the additional meds and it seems to go up a little, stopped drinking and it went up 20 points. Two things I see having changed...gained 10-12 pounds for the first time ever and started drinking more for the first time ever (yeah, right!). I stopped drinking for a few days and the BP goes into the 160's, read where this is to be expected, guess it's a good thing I taper back on drinking before I hit the trail because the 100 mile wilderness doesn't have many bars.
      On the other hand "The Hundred Mile Wilderness" might be a good name for a bar.
    • Drybones wrote:

      At what blood pressure would you be willing to start taking medication? My family doctor started me on it about two years ago when my BP was about 140/90, she (only doctor I ever trusted) adopted a house full of children and gave up her private practice for a director position somewhere to have better hours with the family. With the medication I'm normally around 140/75, my new doctor started me on additional medication. After reading the side affects of both medications I'm considering stopping all of it. I read some doctor on the internet say he'd not medicate unless over 140/90....when I told my wife that she asked if he slept a Holiday Inn Express.
      What are the names and amounts of the meds?
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • Drybones wrote:

      SandyofPA wrote:

      Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV
      Would evening sun not work as well, morning sun would expose neighbors to sights that might scare them for life.
      Morning sun resets the circadian clock, that regulates all the bodies hormones. The sun is vital and early morning sun is mostly IR not UV therefore not going to burn you. Some UVB is needed to make Vitamin D. I have the bottom half of my east facing second story window covered to prevent neighbor exposure, the top half lets in my sunbeam. Tan thru clothing is also available on the Internet!
    • SandyofPA wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      SandyofPA wrote:

      Your age plays into the pressure at which medication is recommended. A pressure of 140/90 is quite normal for someone over 65, but would be far more of a concern for a young person. If you want to reduce BP naturally, try getting 30 minutes of morning sun with as few clothes as possible, no sunscreen or glasses of any kind. Take your BP before and after, mine drops 10 points on both numbers. We tend to forget we are creatures of nature, live indoors under fake light, staring at blue screens, sitting on our butts, eating fake food, getting sicker every year. The Pharmacutical companies love to empty wallets while nature is free! My sister is the MD in the family, so this post reflects my opinions based on reading studies from NHI not mainstream medical practice. YMMV
      Would evening sun not work as well, morning sun would expose neighbors to sights that might scare them for life.
      Morning sun resets the circadian clock, that regulates all the bodies hormones. The sun is vital and early morning sun is mostly IR not UV therefore not going to burn you. Some UVB is needed to make Vitamin D. I have the bottom half of my east facing second story window covered to prevent neighbor exposure, the top half lets in my sunbeam. Tan thru clothing is also available on the Internet!
      berry interesting, I never heard/knew any of that :thumbup:
    • I took these BP readings one after the other this morning, what would you say my BP is? My doctor takes one reading and wants to med me up.
      148/77 - 56
      142/71 - 55
      134/69 - 55
      135/68 - 52
      132/66 - 50
      130/70 - 52
      127/69 - 52
      123/69 - 52
      123/70 - 51
      And these yesterday
      165/87 - 70
      151/81 - 74
      148/78 - 71
      146/81 - 73
      142/76 - 71
      138/74 - 72
      129/73 - 72
      126/71 - 71
      125/70 - 71
      123/64 - 63
      117/60 - 64
      115/61 - 63
      117/60 - 64
      116/60 - 62
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • you're not supposed to take readings one after the other so i'd go with the first reading.

      blood pressure can vary by time of day; every few months i'll check mine in the morning, afternoon, night, and just before bed. mine is consistently highest at 11 pm.

      my pressure is lowest right after hiking -- and you are not supposed to measure it for an hour after exercise to avoid misleading results.

      an ultrasound of your heart will tell you if you experienced any heart enlargement yet -- i had it done when first diagnosed as i didn't believe i had an issue. caught it early.
      2,000 miler
    • i don't believe you should average your results and come up with one "number" and i'll explain why with an oversimplified example.

      lets say that half the day your BP is 100/60 and half the day it's 140/80.

      that's an average of 120/70 which is a normal number and not a problem.

      but -- half the day your BP is elevated and is causing heart damage.

      edit to add: should be no surprise (since i keep an excel spreadsheet of my hiking miles) that i keep a similar spreadsheet of my BP readings. and while i'll admit to coming up with an "average" to spot changing trends, i also have a category for "worst" reading which i also keep an eye on.
      2,000 miler
    • max.patch wrote:

      i don't believe you should average your results and come up with one "number" and i'll explain why with an oversimplified example.

      lets say that half the day your BP is 100/60 and half the day it's 140/80.

      that's an average of 120/70 which is a normal number and not a problem.

      but -- half the day your BP is elevated and is causing heart damage.

      edit to add: should be no surprise (since i keep an excel spreadsheet of my hiking miles) that i keep a similar spreadsheet of my BP readings. and while i'll admit to coming up with an "average" to spot changing trends, i also have a category for "worst" reading which i also keep an eye on.
      makes sense to me.
    • Jake Ace wrote:

      I have a family member who has great BO, but get in the docs office and boom, white coat syndrome, wait a while and they take it again, much lower the second time.
      Even when I take my own blood pressure and put the cuff on and hit the button I always feel uncomfortable, have to clear my throat and have to start taking deeper breaths.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      Started taking meds about two years ago at about 140/90, which may have been a mistake, it stabilized at about 125/75, now it went to about 142/75, started the additional meds and it seems to go up a little, stopped drinking and it went up 20 points. Two things I see having changed...gained 10-12 pounds for the first time ever and started drinking more for the first time ever (yeah, right!). I stopped drinking for a few days and the BP goes into the 160's, read where this is to be expected, guess it's a good thing I taper back on drinking before I hit the trail because the 100 mile wilderness doesn't have many bars.

      Drybones wrote:

      This last medication to make me pee more may have side affects for me, I'm already having a problem with severe muscle cramps at night, now starting during the day, which normally is caused by not enough fluid in your tissues, felt light headed and somewhat disoriented at the gym and had less energy, did have blood drawn for testing prior to gym that may have affected me. I'm thinking maybe at least wait until after the hike to start a medication with unknown results.
      I may be of help - but you did not answer the original question. What are you taking? I too have been thru this over the last five years.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • Checked my BP today when I got to the gym, 117/63, heart rate of 59, problem with changing several life style things is that you don't know what helped and what didn't, I lost 12 lbs during the 100 mile wilderness hike ( it's creeping back), I cut back on the whisky (wont last), I exercise almost daily (always have), am eating much better with mostly totally loaded salads and tuna salad (which I can do forever cause I love it), also started taking so liquid concoction with sea weed and all kinds of crap in it.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Good job. I think losing weight is the best thing you can do. I hit a high point on weight back in May and was having problems with acid reflux. So I got serious about getting healthier. I don't have a specific diet, just normal good food but I eat three meal per day., cut down to sensible portions and cut nearly all snacks. I walk on the treadmill for 30 min and 1.75 miles every night. I weigh myself every morning and chart the progress on an Excel graph. With this system I loose 1 lb per week. Am now down 11 lbs. Would like to loose at least 13 more.
    • My upper BP number has dropped about 15 points, the lower about 20 points, interesting thing is that my heart rate seams affected most...was 50 when I checked it today. This is my typical lunch, enough for four people probably.
      Images
      • 001.jpg

        164.1 kB, 800×450, viewed 21 times
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      My upper BP number has dropped about 15 points, the lower about 20 points, interesting thing is that my heart rate seams affected most...was 50 when I checked it today. This is my typical lunch, enough for four people probably.
      i make a big salad several times a week and take it to work for lunch. Salad, a protein, fruit and nuts. I try hard to stay away from the never-ending donuts and ordering out.

      At home, i try to maintain balance. Too much restriction doesnt work for me. If i want fries and a burger, I eat fries and a burger. But i burn it off on my bike, hike, or whatever and don’t eat burgers and fries every day.

      Ive also been cutting down on alcohol, DB...
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • For me, lunch is usually leftovers. For breakfast it's usually Whole milk plain (NOT Greek) yoghurt with Muesli and pomegranates. My favorite salad is the classic Greek salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, onion, green peppers olives, and feta. For a dressing just olive oil. Maybe some oregano lemon juice. Not lettuce. When I ordered this in Turkey, they always reminded me it was an Anatolian Salad, not Greek. When I ordered it in Greece, they always reminded me it was a Greek salad, not Anatolian.
    • Drybones wrote:

      I have intentions of making a small salad but by the time I add spinach, onions, cucumber, tomato, cranberries, black walnuts, sunflower seeds, grapes, apple, cheese, croutons....they seem to grow
      Yeah, but you are better off with a larger salad than a lot of other things you could be eating.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General