Welcome to the AppalachianTrailCafe.net!
Take a moment and register and then join the conversation

Winter Day Hikes

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • Some type of traction device like katoola or yaktraks, gloves with overmittens, insulated coozies for my water bottles, a good wool cap, wind shirt and wind pants, a couple of hand warmers, and I'll tie a bandana across my face cowboy style, wear or carry my fleece and have my puffy coat in my pack, put my candy bars in my pants pockets so they don't break my teeth when I eat them
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Besides clothing appropriate for the conditions we'll often carry our MSR Simmerlite stove so that we can make a hot drink.
      We've also carried our sleeping bags on really bad days.
      I ended up packing my down bag, stove, and drinks bag just in case. I put the tent in also but decided it was overkill, plus it didn’t fit once the extra clothes were in there. This is the first time for taking my bag on a day hike...I think.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I get concerned about injuring myself when hiking alone in winter and not being found for hours and hours. I have a narrow comfort zone where cold is concerned.

      I also worried about fording a stream and possibly falling in. To be honest, the worry had me awake at 4am, considering my options and thinking about bailing. It turned out I was able to rock hop across with only getting one shoe partially wet.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      I get concerned about injuring myself when hiking alone in winter and not being found for hours and hours. I have a narrow comfort zone where cold is concerned.

      I also worried about fording a stream and possibly falling in. To be honest, the worry had me awake at 4am, considering my options and thinking about bailing. It turned out I was able to rock hop across with only getting one shoe partially wet.
      You probably already knew this, but release the buckles on your pack straps just in case when fording a stream.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      I get concerned about injuring myself when hiking alone in winter and not being found for hours and hours. I have a narrow comfort zone where cold is concerned.

      I also worried about fording a stream and possibly falling in. To be honest, the worry had me awake at 4am, considering my options and thinking about bailing. It turned out I was able to rock hop across with only getting one shoe partially wet.
      Reminds me of a time when Kathy and I were going to do a multi-day, winter's hike, starting after dark.
      Kathy slipped and fell into a stream, soaked through and through, less than a mile into the hike.
      She wanted to hike herself dry but I thought it was too cold for that. I set up the tent right near the stream, had her dry off and change into her sleep clothes, and then get into her sleeping bag. She thanked me the next day when she found her hiking clothes frozen solid. We hiked back to the car and came home.
    • Utah Parks and Recreation Division sponsored several hikes across the state on 1 Jan. Called ‘First Day Hike’ naturalists and biologists along with volunteers led hikers on trails stopping to speak on various landscape features. Several of us participated in the event held on Antelope Island located in the Great Salt Lake. We were pleased to see many families with children participating despite the brisk temps. To the delight of same, a bison, numerous birds, as well as two pronghorns were viewed.

      Having previously checked times of sunset and moonrise for this date, we proceeded to the southern shoreline of the GSL. We viewed the setting sun behind the Oquirrh Mountains and a few minutes later the rising Super Moon from beyond the Wasatch Range. A unique experience.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC