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Hiking Plans 2018

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    • LIhikers wrote:

      I want to wish well to everybody who's hiking this year.
      I'm envious of you as I don't expect to be out on the trails much this year.
      Haven't done an overnighter since MLK 2018 and have no idea when will again :(
      Living vicariously is better than not living at all.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, Max Patch to Franconia Notch NH and the Gale River Trail to Crawford Notch NH.
    • Drybones wrote:

      Seems I'm between sizes on everything, a 34" pant is too small and a 36" too big, and you just cant find 35s, shoe sizes stop 1/2 sizes at 12-1/2 and all info on the shoes I ordered say up a 1/2", they don't make 13-1/2 sizes...I ordered a 14...hurts me to think my feet are that big, I was a 12 not long ago, and, as a matter of fact, the shoes sizing gadgets in shoe stores still say I'm a 12 but they don't fit.
      I have always worn a size 8 since I was in college, and on occasion when shoes ran small, an 8-1/2. However, I was shocked, SHOCKED I tell you, when Rob, the footwear expert at Outdoor 76, put me in a Brooks size 10 for everyday wear and in a 9-1/2 Hoka One on One Speedgoat 2 for hiking. He explained that the important part of a fit is not the length but rather how it fits around your heel and back part of your foot. I've worn my everyday Brooks for 2 months now, about 4 days a week, and the hiking shoes for 4 day hikes totaling 37 miles and both pair are wearing so excellently!!!

      max.patch wrote:


      i actually drove to katahdin and then the whites from georgia. and as a history buff -- the freedom trail in boston. wouldn't wanna live there -- but boston is a neat city to visit.
      As far as a city to visit, Indianapolis was my favorite in the early 2000's. Then my daughter did a summer internship in Lowell, Mass in 2006 and worked there for a year after graduation 2007-2008. We went to Boston a number of times when I took her to Lowell both times and when I and my husband visited her. I also went to training in Boston from work. After the initial trip to Boston in 2006, it became my favorite city to visit, which was reinforced on subsequent trips. Love it there. Have to find an excuse to visit again.

      LIhikers wrote:

      I want to wish well to everybody who's hiking this year.
      I'm envious of you as I don't expect to be out on the trails much this year.
      Haven't done an overnighter since MLK 2018 and have no idea when will again :(
      I haven't done an overnighter since last year's hike from Harper's Ferry to Mason-Dixon line. But this year I've done 3 day hikes on the AT and several day hikes here in Michigan. Each time I'm out hiking in the woods refreshes my soul! So, don't let the lack of being able to be out overnight stop you. Remember: you won't regret the things you do, you will regret the things you don't do. Carpe Diem!
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      I'm going to do something, I just don't know what or when. How's that for a plan?
      One of the NCOs that worked with us was fond of saying ‘Plan A goes to he.. with the landing of the first mortar round, than you’d better have a Plan B, C, and at times a D.

      However my hiking plans have not survived the events of the past few years. Therefore it’s been a catch as I can.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • At our work place there are many who are fed up with the trend which has you spend six months establishing your annual plans and six months evaluating your progress toward these plans. It's called paralysis by analysis.

      For this year my goal is to figure out the difference between a goal and objective.
    • odd man out wrote:

      At our work place there are many who are fed up with the trend which has you spend six months establishing your annual plans and six months evaluating your progress toward these plans. It's called paralysis by analysis.

      For this year my goal is to figure out the difference between a goal and objective.
      Cof124
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • odd man out wrote:

      At our work place there are many who are fed up with the trend which has you spend six months establishing your annual plans and six months evaluating your progress toward these plans. It's called paralysis by analysis.

      For this year my goal is to figure out the difference between a goal and objective.
      I got lucky this year. Our Chief Technical Officer set my 2018 Objectives in early January through my direct supervisor. A month later, I was moved to a different cost center. The new supervisor smiled when I asked about my 2018 Objectives and said "We tend to review things at the end of the year and revise the objectives to meet the reality of the what happened during the year."

      In other words, do what is expected of you, and you will not fall short of your published objectives.

      The whole process is pretty silly since I work in a development group. Maybe 50% of the projects I have in January continue in an active status, and there will be at least 5 - 10 new projects by the end of the year that weren't conceived back in January when the Goals & Objectives were set. All that matters is getting time off to hit the trail!
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, Max Patch to Franconia Notch NH and the Gale River Trail to Crawford Notch NH.
    • I use a similar strategy at home. If I make a "to do" list in the morning, by the end of the day I will find I have accomplished none of those things despite being busy all day. So I throw out that list and make another, listing in detail everything I actually did and then cross them all off. Then I leave it out where my wife will see it.
    • odd man out wrote:

      I use a similar strategy at home. If I make a "to do" list in the morning, by the end of the day I will find I have accomplished none of those things despite being busy all day. So I throw out that list and make another, listing in detail everything I actually did and then cross them all off. Then I leave it out where my wife will see it.
      Smart man!...lol :thumbup:
    • I'm resting up now at a hostel in Big Bear, CA. Made it to mile 252 from Campo at a very slow pace (this is week 3). On last year's hike three weeks bought me 350 miles. This desert has been very hard on me, lots of skin lost on the bottom of my feet and between the toes. If they heal enough by tomorrow I might try to get one more day of hiking in before heading home. Looks like I'm on the ten-year plan for the PCT.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      I'm resting up now at a hostel in Big Bear, CA. Made it to mile 252 from Campo at a very slow pace (this is week 3). On last year's hike three weeks bought me 350 miles. This desert has been very hard on me, lots of skin lost on the bottom of my feet and between the toes. If they heal enough by tomorrow I might try to get one more day of hiking in before heading home. Looks like I'm on the ten-year plan for the PCT.
      I hope you heal up quick and can make a few more miles. A key thing with section hiking it trying to make to a convenient place logistically to pickup at next year.
      Nothing wrong with spending 10 years doing something you enjoy doing. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Got my pack packed and stuck in a dufflebag, flight boards at 5:40 in the morning, got an hour drive to the B'ham airport so it's up at 3:00, had some reservations about doing this hike but am ready to roll now, the body wont be any younger next year, I am carrying more weight than normal for me, luxury items, extra fuel for coffee each morning, wet butt wipes, hand wipes and I even have a Cohiba cigar to burn at trails end...just need to find a smooth sippin drink to go with it.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      Got my pack packed and stuck in a dufflebag, flight boards at 5:40 in the morning, got an hour drive to the B'ham airport so it's up at 3:00, had some reservations about doing this hike but am ready to roll now, the body wont be any younger next year, I am carrying more weight than normal for me, luxury items, extra fuel for coffee each morning, wet butt wipes, hand wipes and I even have a Cohiba cigar to burn at trails end...just need to find a smooth sippin drink to go with it.
      Look forward crossing paths with you in a few weeks. :thumbup:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Drybones wrote:

      Got my pack packed and stuck in a dufflebag, flight boards at 5:40 in the morning, got an hour drive to the B'ham airport so it's up at 3:00, had some reservations about doing this hike but am ready to roll now, the body wont be any younger next year, I am carrying more weight than normal for me, luxury items, extra fuel for coffee each morning, wet butt wipes, hand wipes and I even have a Cohiba cigar to burn at trails end...just need to find a smooth sippin drink to go with it.
      Bon voyage! Via con Dios~
    • PCT 2018 Section Report:

      Got back a few days ago from a three week section. I had hoped to be out there longer, but as usual I missed my family and decided three weeks was enough. Started at the southern terminus (Campo) and hiked to Big Bear Lake California for 266 PCT miles. I now have about 1000 miles total. Looks like I am four years in on a ten year plan.

      In terms of miles covered this is my worst effort yet. For comparison last year I did 350 miles in he same amount of time. This is the desert section, and the sun is not my friend. I find the heat and especially the sun challenging. I took long mid-day siestas and needed two zero days this hike.

      There is great beauty in the desert, I just wish I could get out there earlier in the year to enjoy it. Next year's section will pick up where I left off and will include crossing the Mojave.

      Met lots of nice hiker trash this time. There were many foreigners on the trail. Had a great time overall. When I am finished with it I will add a link to my TrailJournal.

      Scott
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • odd man out wrote:

      Nice. I'm curious, what countries were the foreigners from, mosly? The last time we were in the SW (Grand Canyon) we met lots of Germans and a Finnish motorcycle gang on a road trip from Chicago to LA.
      Germany was number one. I liked the German hikers, they were purists like me :) "Ve will hike every step" There was also a older lady from Switzerland, a girl from Poland, two Irish hikers', a woman from England, Koreans, and many more. I don't know how these people make a living, but many of them just seem to go from one adventure to the next. It was fun talking with them.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • Finished my Trail Journal for this years PCT section hike, Campo to Big Bear Lake, CA, 266 miles. Here is the link to the first entry (there are 21 new entries, so keep clicking 'Next' for more).

      trailjournals.com/journal/entry/591193

      If you have never seen my PCT Trail Journal, here is a link to the very first page...

      trailjournals.com/journal/entry/552736
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Finished my Trail Journal for this years PCT section hike, Campo to Big Bear Lake, CA, 266 miles. Here is the link to the first entry (there are 21 new entries, so keep clicking 'Next' for more).

      trailjournals.com/journal/entry/591193

      If you have never seen my PCT Trail Journal, here is a link to the very first page...

      trailjournals.com/journal/entry/552736
      i enjoyed reading that. i hate to stop and take pictures; i appreciate journals of people who take the time to so so.

      i hope you took lessons from carley and marley on how to stay clean!
      2,000 miler
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Finished my Trail Journal for this years PCT section hike, Campo to Big Bear Lake, CA, 266 miles. Here is the link to the first entry (there are 21 new entries, so keep clicking 'Next' for more).

      trailjournals.com/journal/entry/591193

      If you have never seen my PCT Trail Journal, here is a link to the very first page...

      trailjournals.com/journal/entry/552736
      Awesome Job!!!
      Made me sort of feel like I was there! :thumbup:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General