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And In Other News

    • LIhikers wrote:

      I dragged our family, wife and one kid at the time, to Holland for 6 months. My son was 3 at the time and it was interesting when he'd play with the neighborhood kids as they didn't speak English and he didn't speak Dutch. But somehow it worked out fine as they all spoke "childish". I'd go back to Holland in a heart beat, nice people and a nice country with a lot to see and learn about.
      From age 1 to 2 my oldest son lived in Brazil. At 2 he did not really speak either English or Portuguese, but he understood both. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I won't be painting as I go, but I would like to take a shot at the Long Trail by the time I am 64. :)
      Fear is that it will be as tough as, or tougher than the Whites.

      At least I know I can knock out the first 100 miles. And then after a night at Inn at Long Trail the "real fun/challenge" would begin. :/
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Astro ().

    • New

      LIhikers wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yes, I would say England and Scotland should count as 2, Wales as a third if you had the opportunity to make it there. :) My wife loved the farm stay so much we had in Wales (four children 7 and under at the time), that we altered our plans and stayed an extra day. Had a great time other than on the last day when my 3 year old was trying to feed the free range chickens (unfortunately fertilizer instead of chicken feed).
      Been to England twice and Scotland once. Wales is near the top of our list of places to go. Maybe after another trip to Paris followed by Southern France. We really liked Paris (am I the only one), but were only there for a few days and didn't see any other parts of the France. I don't speak any foreign languages (other than Biochemistry) but I know more words in French than any other language and am reasonably proficient at restaurant menu French. I'm not even going to try Welsh. Can you say llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch?Glad to hear I am not the only one to drag a family through Europe. We took our three kids on a trip to England, Netherlands, Belgium, and Paris. Then another with two of them to Ireland. We stayed at a great B&B outside Leterfrack where we got caught in the middle of a pub brawl. I couldn't tell if they were speaking Gaelic or English with a drunk-Irish accent, but the little guy said something to piss off the big guy and they went flying across the room and landed right on top of our table. The next morning our B&B host said matter of factly "There must have been a funeral. After funerals, everyone goes to the pub and gets into fights." I said "You do know you are not doing much to dispel Irish stereotypes, don't you?"
      I dragged our family, wife and one kid at the time, to Holland for 6 months. My son was 3 at the time and it was interesting when he'd play with the neighborhood kids as they didn't speak English and he didn't speak Dutch. But somehow it worked out fine as they all spoke "childish". I'd go back to Holland in a heart beat, nice people and a nice country with a lot to see and learn about.
      I have a neat story about the Netherlands. Before my 2004 visit, I was looking through my global corporate phone directory and picked a fellow engineer out of the names in our Dutch factory. His family name had the same last four letters as mine and I guessed (correctly) that there was some significance. I asked him a bunch of questions related to transportation within the country and we kept corresponding after the trip.

      After sharing my first few AT hiking journals, he got inspired to hike the North Sea Trail from Belgium to Germany. And then he got inspired to create a book from his photos, adding in geographical and historical information on the Dutch people's relationship with the sea.



      A year or so later, he got inspired to create an English-language version and yours truly served as the translator / editor.



      So I have never been to the actual seaside of the Netherlands, but I now know more about the coastal history and the creation of the Delta Works flood control project than some Dutch folks. :)
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, Max Patch to Franconia Notch NH and the Gale River Trail to Pinkham Notch NH.
    • New

      I've thought about taking up sketching again and doing some pencil drawings while I hike. There was a lady who hiked the PCT a few years back and did sketches in colored pencils as she hiked that were really good. I haven't done any artwork since late middle school when I stopped art and started architecture.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • New

      IMScotty wrote:

      Stalking Tortoise,

      RE: Seaside of the Netherlands

      Great Story!
      agree. We visited a sealife rescue center on the coast during our short trip to northern Netherlands. Also learned from a friend at work that names ending -sma were from Freisland. Of course we live in the middle of the biggest community of Dutch-Americans so we see lots of Dutch names. Always thought it would be tough to have the name DeWeerd.