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Odd but tru - how many of you fry on the Trail..

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    • JimBlue wrote:

      there is aluminum in the soil. Not large amounts unless you are near bauxite ore which is aluminum ore.
      We are all going to die... CLICK

      This is the what is left from the manufacture of Aluminum Foil many of these ponds are along the Mississippi

      [IMG:https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/B%C3%BCtzflethermoor_Rotschlammdeponie_Luftaufnahmen_2012-05-by-RaBoe-478-1.jpg]
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Wise Old Owl ().

    • [IMG:http://www.cherokee.org/portals/0/Images/DSC_0495.JPG?ver=2017-06-27-162900-467]
      Fry bread is not a traditional Cherokee recipe, yet it has become a
      staple here over the past 50 years or so. It's often served with brown
      beans or as the base for an 'Indian Taco.' There are many recipes and
      lots of disagreement on which is the best. Here's a simple recipe that
      is tasty.


      You will need:

      2 C. flour
      1/2 tsp. salt
      1/2 C. water
      1/2 tsp. baking powder
      1/2 C. instant dry milk
      2 C. shortening

      Add the flour, baking powder, salt, powdered milk and water into a bowl
      and mix just enough to form a doughball. Don't overwork the dough or it
      will become tough.

      Heat shortening until flakes of flour start to bubble when dropped into
      it. While shortening is heating, pull off a palm-sized mound of dough
      and roll it into a smooth ball, then flatten into a disk shape. Size is a
      matter of preference.

      Put dough disks into hot shortening one or two at a time (don't let them
      touch), cook until brown, turn over with tongs and cook other side
      until brown. Watch carefully--they can get away from you and burn!

      You
      can take a brown paper bag and place a few sheets of paper towels on
      the bottom and drop finished fry bread into bag to let grease drain.
      Makes about 6 servings.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • 2 strips of good bacon
      2 C. cooked hominy or one 15 oz can, yellow or white
      2 or 3 green onions or a good handful of wild onions (RAMPS)


      Fry bacon while cutting green onions into small pieces. Remove and
      crumble bacon, set aside. Add onions to drippings to cook. When the
      onions begin to sizzle, add hominy and cook for about 10 to 15 minutes
      first on high heat, then on low. Add bacon back to the mixture and serve
      hot.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • Dmax wrote:

      You don't want the skillet my wife carries. She picked it up at REI and probably weighs as much as our tent...........
      Years ago my mom hung onto a skillet with a broken handle... So as a young boy I asked her because she had the money... "Mom why do you hang on to this when it has a broken handle?" she replied.... to remind me of the time I threw this at your dad and it hit the wall behind him...." Even after his passing and she just turned 80 that pan is still there.

      Serious this is a true conversation
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?