Welcome to the AppalachianTrailCafe.net!
Take a moment and register and then join the conversation

dumb idea

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • "The Appalachian Trail is ten minutes from their backyard in Greenville, South Carolina. Bekah and Derrick grew up seeing thru-hikers and hiking sections of the trail themselves"

      Not from Greenville, SC they didn't. Has Outside ever heard of the word "EDITOR" or "COPYCHECKER"???? Already, I became suspicious...

      "We use a brand called gDiapers with an outer cloth cover and compostable insert. They’re eco-friendly, but we’re not going to bury them. They will be disposed in trash cans every two days or so when we go through towns or pass a trailhead."

      I didn't know you went through towns every two days. Or trailheads with trash can's. See, I guess they really did do their research...and yet, I remain suspicious...

      And, I am sure they've tested out how they are going to deal with the awesome diaper rash that a one year old riding in a backpack all day in the heat and humidity will develop almost instantly...because, they are outdoor people with decades of experience. Oh...wait...they barely have two decades of planetary existence? No worry. It's America. You can do whatever you want, in America. It's THE AMERICAN WAY(tm)...
    • Maybe it is a odd idea- maybe not - I am glad they are HYOH and trying... I don't see an issue... just a first. If they bail so what?

      I have witness more stupid stuff when bringing children on the trail - this will not be in the top ten of OMG! This is a bad idea to those of us who have hiked before. It's a 15 pound bundle of joy that doesn't have to walk.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • Yes, it does sound like a bad idea, but what the heck. They will figure that out for themselves at some point. It will be interesting to see how far they get. There are far worse things parents could do with a baby than take them on a hike (like leaving them propped up in front of a TV all day).

      I wish them all a safe hike and a bunch of fun and stories to tell their child someday about their great adventure on the AT.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • It's a poorly written article. They live 10 minutes from the AT at their current home (and former home town) in VA, not SC. And surprise, they're accepting donations.

      I can't even imagine attempting this.

      ellieontheat.com/
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • wow. Well, hmmm.....so many thoughts. DO NOT stay in shelters (kid up all night, since they slept all day in the carrier), health issues. They state they want the kid in the outdoors. Well, she won't remember any of it.....
      Pirating – Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    • If you want to consider the Foothills Trail to Bartram Trail to Benton McKaye Trail your "Approach Trail" then, yes, one could consider the AT as being 10 minutes from your backyard in Greenville, South Carolina. Y'know, come to think of it, this would also meet the "flip-flop" criteria if you used this approach trail then headed south to Springer, ferried ahead to Katahdin and headed south again....
      If your Doctor is a tree, you're on acid.
    • Rasty wrote:

      I disagree with it being dumb. She's one years old. Babies are easy at one years old. By two they are running around. I could easily see hiking with one kid. Two kids would be very difficult for a couple to hike with.
      Yeah I remember being easier when we had the children outnumbered 2:1. :)

      But before you know it was 2:2, 2:3, and eventually outnumbered 2:4. :rolleyes:
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      I disagree with it being dumb. She's one years old. Babies are easy at one years old. By two they are running around. I could easily see hiking with one kid. Two kids would be very difficult for a couple to hike with.
      Yeah I remember being easier when we had the children outnumbered 2:1. :)
      But before you know it was 2:2, 2:3, and eventually outnumbered 2:4. :rolleyes:
      yes. I recall going from 2:2 to 2:3 to be the biggest difference as you are now outnumbered. Plus so many things (cars, restaurant tables, hotel rooms. etc...) are designed to accommodate 4. Going to a family of 5 was most inconvenient.
    • Foresight wrote:

      If you want to consider the Foothills Trail to Bartram Trail to Benton McKaye Trail your "Approach Trail" then, yes, one could consider the AT as being 10 minutes from your backyard in Greenville, South Carolina. Y'know, come to think of it, this would also meet the "flip-flop" criteria if you used this approach trail then headed south to Springer, ferried ahead to Katahdin and headed south again....
      they're from Roanoke and have moved back there from SC. I believe the author of the article made a mistake in the details.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I'm sure they can handle whatever happens...ear infections, noro, falls, and sleep deprivation, but it's the mental hardship that will get them. With little or no sleep, they will be less equipped to handle the issues.

      Honestly, my primary concern isn't for them but for other hikers. They won't have a choice about sharing sleeping space at times and that's just selfish to force other hikers to deal with your baby.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      I'm sure they can handle whatever happens...ear infections, noro, falls, and sleep deprivation, but it's the mental hardship that will get them. With little or no sleep, they will be less equipped to handle the issues.

      Honestly, my primary concern isn't for them but for other hikers. They won't have a choice about sharing sleeping space at times and that's just selfish to force other hikers to deal with your baby.
      It's their first kid and they are 25 with no medical background. I seriously doubt they can handle the baby getting an ear infection, noro, etc...without running to the nearest trailhead and hitching into a town, post haste. Or, hitting their SPOT...

      My primary concern is for the poor helpless child. My secondary concern is for other hikers. It is in no way fair(and IMHO should not even be allowed) to bring this child into a packed shelter or to camp in any multi-tent area. Would any of us put up with a drunken psycho screaming incoherently at the top of their lungs for an hour at 2am? No? Then, why would we put up with a baby doing the same screaming? And, anyone who has had a one-year old will attest to the decibel level of their frantic screams. They only communicate by frantic screams. Hungry? Scream. Wet diaper? Scream. Hurt? Scream. Sick? Scream. Tired? Scream. Scared? Scream.......

      Plus, I can't wait until they encounter Fido on the trail. That will be interesting...at best....
    • While I don't condone taking an infant upon the AT, I've always admired the fortitude of folks willing to travel westward during the early years of our country. Infants were conceived, carried to term, and born on the trail...with rudimentary victuals, questionable water, crude shelter, and no bailout opportunities.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Dan76 wrote:

      While I don't condone taking an infant upon the AT, I've always admired the fortitude of folks willing to travel westward during the early years of our country. Infants were conceived, carried to term, and born on the trail...with rudimentary victuals, questionable water, crude shelter, and no bailout opportunities.
      Yeah you admire those who take on the challenges and hardships of life head on.
      But that is a little different from a pair just planning a "vacation"
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Dan76 wrote:

      While I don't condone taking an infant upon the AT, I've always admired the fortitude of folks willing to travel westward during the early years of our country. Infants were conceived, carried to term, and born on the trail...with rudimentary victuals, questionable water, crude shelter, and no bailout opportunities.
      And, they routinely died before age 2...look at the gravestones at family plots from the 18th and 19th century, not unusual for two parents to have buried 5 or 6 children before age 5 and only 2 or 3 lived to adulthood....also not unusual for a man to bury two or more wives before he died...childbirth in the 1700's was a bitch...
    • ScareBear wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      While I don't condone taking an infant upon the AT, I've always admired the fortitude of folks willing to travel westward during the early years of our country. Infants were conceived, carried to term, and born on the trail...with rudimentary victuals, questionable water, crude shelter, and no bailout opportunities.
      And, they routinely died before age 2...look at the gravestones at family plots from the 18th and 19th century, not unusual for two parents to have buried 5 or 6 children before age 5 and only 2 or 3 lived to adulthood....also not unusual for a man to bury two or more wives before he died...childbirth in the 1700's was a bitch...
      Yup. The "good ol' days" weren't as good as we like to think. On the other hand, I agree that our modern obsession with safety has gone way to far. At least the kid probably won't grow up to have allergy or autoimmune problems.
    • meat wrote:

      I wouldn't take an infant for the same reason I wouldn't take a dog, to many things can happen where you'd have to bail to handle responsibilities. Who needs that crap. Nope, leave the dog home to keep mama company.
      And it was your choice to take on what ever challenges come your way, but not theirs.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      meat wrote:

      I wouldn't take an infant for the same reason I wouldn't take a dog, to many things can happen where you'd have to bail to handle responsibilities. Who needs that crap. Nope, leave the dog home to keep mama company.
      And it was your choice to take on what ever challenges come your way, but not theirs.
      yeah I'm just talkin' for me, obvi they can do whatever they like...I honestly don't really care that much :) might make for some good reading this season.
    • ScareBear wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I'm sure they can handle whatever happens...ear infections, noro, falls, and sleep deprivation, but it's the mental hardship that will get them. With little or no sleep, they will be less equipped to handle the issues.

      Honestly, my primary concern isn't for them but for other hikers. They won't have a choice about sharing sleeping space at times and that's just selfish to force other hikers to deal with your baby.
      It's their first kid and they are 25 with no medical background. I seriously doubt they can handle the baby getting an ear infection, noro, etc...without running to the nearest trailhead and hitching into a town, post haste. Or, hitting their SPOT...
      My primary concern is for the poor helpless child. My secondary concern is for other hikers. It is in no way fair(and IMHO should not even be allowed) to bring this child into a packed shelter or to camp in any multi-tent area. Would any of us put up with a drunken psycho screaming incoherently at the top of their lungs for an hour at 2am? No? Then, why would we put up with a baby doing the same screaming? And, anyone who has had a one-year old will attest to the decibel level of their frantic screams. They only communicate by frantic screams. Hungry? Scream. Wet diaper? Scream. Hurt? Scream. Sick? Scream. Tired? Scream. Scared? Scream.......

      Plus, I can't wait until they encounter Fido on the trail. That will be interesting...at best....
      Lol, exactly what I'd do. Control the fever with an OTC and get off the trail to get to a Doc. :)

      Actually, I rarely took my kids to the pediatrician. I usually waited it out. My youngest had to get a few vaccines in high school and had no memory of ever going to the Dr. for a sick visit. The other two only went once or twice also. They had childhood vaccines at the health dept.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • meat wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      meat wrote:

      I wouldn't take an infant for the same reason I wouldn't take a dog, to many things can happen where you'd have to bail to handle responsibilities. Who needs that crap. Nope, leave the dog home to keep mama company.
      And it was your choice to take on what ever challenges come your way, but not theirs.
      yeah I'm just talkin' for me, obvi they can do whatever they like...I honestly don't really care that much :) might make for some good reading this season.
      Kids are much more resilient than people think. And they remember nothing...thank goodness, otherwise they'd throw it back in your face that you let them roll off the bed when they were babies! :D

      I really think the kid will be fine and parents will learn a lot about themselves and parenting. And the hikers around them will either speed up or slow down. It all gets sorted out in the wash.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I met a young couple on the AT hiking in deep snow with a young son and daughter, beautiful family, most folks would throw rocks at the parents for having the kids out in the middle of nowhere in that kind of weather, they were all having a blast.....I applaud them for giving the kids a life worth having.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      I met a young couple on the AT hiking in deep snow with a young son and daughter, beautiful family, most folks would throw rocks at the parents for having the kids out in the middle of nowhere in that kind of weather, they were all having a blast.....I applaud them for giving the kids a life worth having.
      Nice post DB...


      Folks, I can guess I am an opinionated old owl, and this interesting thread has budded some folk to pre-judge worse than me. It's an interesting read, having never seen anything like this before. I have seen a lot of terrible bad parenting, this isn't it. I had to post something to figure out where I left off.

      Let's just say I love the parent's enthusiasm for the trail.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Foresight wrote:

      If you want to consider the Foothills Trail to Bartram Trail to Benton McKaye Trail your "Approach Trail" then, yes, one could consider the AT as being 10 minutes from your backyard in Greenville, South Carolina. Y'know, come to think of it, this would also meet the "flip-flop" criteria if you used this approach trail then headed south to Springer, ferried ahead to Katahdin and headed south again....
      they're from Roanoke and have moved back there from SC. I believe the author of the article made a mistake in the details.
      I picked up what you were putting down earlier about them being from in VA now and was just being snarky with the above.
      If your Doctor is a tree, you're on acid.
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      meat wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      meat wrote:

      I wouldn't take an infant for the same reason I wouldn't take a dog, to many things can happen where you'd have to bail to handle responsibilities. Who needs that crap. Nope, leave the dog home to keep mama company.
      And it was your choice to take on what ever challenges come your way, but not theirs.
      yeah I'm just talkin' for me, obvi they can do whatever they like...I honestly don't really care that much :) might make for some good reading this season.
      Kids are much more resilient than people think. And they remember nothing...thank goodness, otherwise they'd throw it back in your face that you let them roll off the bed when they were babies! :D
      I really think the kid will be fine and parents will learn a lot about themselves and parenting. And the hikers around them will either speed up or slow down. It all gets sorted out in the wash.
      I rolled out of bed when I was old enough to crawl back into bed. I still toss and turn, but I haven't landed on the floor in a long time.
    • WanderingStovie wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      meat wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      meat wrote:

      I wouldn't take an infant for the same reason I wouldn't take a dog, to many things can happen where you'd have to bail to handle responsibilities. Who needs that crap. Nope, leave the dog home to keep mama company.
      And it was your choice to take on what ever challenges come your way, but not theirs.
      yeah I'm just talkin' for me, obvi they can do whatever they like...I honestly don't really care that much :) might make for some good reading this season.
      Kids are much more resilient than people think. And they remember nothing...thank goodness, otherwise they'd throw it back in your face that you let them roll off the bed when they were babies! :D I really think the kid will be fine and parents will learn a lot about themselves and parenting. And the hikers around them will either speed up or slow down. It all gets sorted out in the wash.
      I rolled out of bed when I was old enough to crawl back into bed. I still toss and turn, but I haven't landed on the floor in a long time.
      I remember rolling out of bed, I had the top bunk and took the mattress with me as I fell. My Dad scooped me up and put the bed back together. The next day they installed a railing on the bed. I was five.