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Is cooking on the trail almost dead?

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    • If you hate plastic bags you will love Great Berrington, MA, they are illegal there.

      Had to carry resupply from grocery store in a big brown bag at 9pm at night. Even Subway had to use paper bags.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I use FBC type recipies but cook in the pot. I add 2 cups of water and food, bring to boil, stove off, put pot in cozy, let set. I'm not so much worried about chemicals from the bags. I don't want to accumulate all those dirty freezer bags. Also, I feel foods cook more thoroughly if brought to a full boil for a few seconds rather than near boiling as in FBC. This can give more flexibility in menu planning. Maybe it's my imagination. Maybe someday I will do a side by side comparison of my recipes cooked both ways.
    • meat wrote:

      CoachLou wrote:

      My dad is 81, I am almost 60, we have been doing autobody work since he could work. I am not concerned with little plastic atoms in my chow.
      That's how I feel, if I was pregnant I might worry, but as an adult, I'm already smoked.
      We'll all worry if you turn up pregnant.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • JimBlue wrote:

      I got mine when I discovered the Morse code requirement had been dropped in 1997. I hope to get my extra license next year.
      Well it's about ham time! I know ... --- ... but hope I never need it.

      JimBlue wrote:

      I try do to things other than field day, but until I get my wasps problem solved, warm weather is not safe in my shed/cabin.
      I nock nests down when it is well below freezing, but you maybe you keep getting new squatters.

      Dan76 wrote:

      meat wrote:

      CoachLou wrote:

      My dad is 81, I am almost 60, we have been doing autobody work since he could work. I am not concerned with little plastic atoms in my chow.
      That's how I feel, if I was pregnant I might worry, but as an adult, I'm already smoked.
      We'll all worry if you turn up pregnant.
      Better nocked out than nocked up.
    • FYI these are beneficial insects.


      Yellow jackets and baldfaced hornets make nests from a papery pulp comprised of chewed-up wood fibers mixed with saliva. Their nests consist of a series of rounded combs stacked in tiers. These combs are covered by an envelope consisting of several layers of pulp.

      Yellow jackets commonly build nests below ground in old rodent burrows or similar cavities. They can also locate their nests in other cavities, such as hollow logs and landscape timbers as well as in buildings in attics and wall voids (figures 13 and 14). Other yellow jackets, including baldfaced hornets, build aerial nests out in the open in places such as trees and under eaves of buildings (figures 9, 10 and 15). Yellow jacket and baldfaced hornet nests can number from several hundred to several thousand insects at their peak. Nests are used for just one season and not reoccupied the following season.


      JB I have never used a room fogger for Yellow or Wasp ever.... The best time to knock down the nests with water & power sprayer, is in the fall, as Winter weather will rip them from the trees and make them fall apart. Nest are for summer reproduction. We use dusts most of the time, and its green and low and slow. They cannot handle a puff of diatomaceous earth inside the nest. A couple of weeks go by and we dust again to get the new hatches. Instead of a fogger can I recommend if you do have a "break thru" in the ceiling a shop vac with some soap and water about an inch in the bottom of the vac is all you need.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose. Uh folks nobody eats Yellow Jackets.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • max.patch wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose.
      ya gotta do that at night.
      use your red light setting on your headlamp they can't see red. Pour a cup of gas in the hole and put a board or brick over it. The fumes will kill them. I've killed many a nest this way.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • max.patch wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose.
      ya gotta do that at night.
      I do lots of things at night.....Isn't that when the zombies apocalypse peak? Its a food thread.... [IMG:http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg275/MarkSwarbrick/Fun%20Post/oopsowl_zpsaz1d6tev.jpg]
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose.
      ya gotta do that at night.
      use your red light setting on your headlamp they can't see red. Pour a cup of gas in the hole and put a board or brick over it. The fumes will kill them. I've killed many a nest this way.
      It's more fun to go out with a fly swatter and just piss them off...not sure I can run fast enough to do that any more.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose.
      ya gotta do that at night.
      use your red light setting on your headlamp they can't see red. Pour a cup of gas in the hole and put a board or brick over it. The fumes will kill them. I've killed many a nest this way.
      Yea that would work - but there are others that would read that and light it... I think the statistic is low, but so many show up with that brick in pieces in the face at the hospital. Folks Over the counter Wasp Spray is on some level Kerosene. "petroleum distillates" So many have shown up with pebbles embedded in the face. There are safer Fumigants, and/or powders.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose.
      ya gotta do that at night.
      use your red light setting on your headlamp they can't see red. Pour a cup of gas in the hole and put a board or brick over it. The fumes will kill them. I've killed many a nest this way.
      If you want to make it interesting, throw a match in there with the cup of gas. :D

      Come to think of it, with the match less than a cup of gas would probably do the job.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose. Uh folks nobody eats Yellow Jackets.
      My wife ate a yellow jacket once. We were on the deck eating supper just as she was going to put a fork full of potato salad in her mouth, a YJ landed on it. It happened so fast I couldn't stop it. All I could do is tell her what happened after the fact. It wasn't pretty.
    • We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
      One egg fry pan, cheap aluminum not real heavy, Walmart and others.
    • SandyofPA wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
      One egg fry pan, cheap aluminum not real heavy, Walmart and others.
      Coming soon to a campsite near you...Lihikers' version of IHOP.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • LIhikers wrote:

      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      i did that in the blood mountain shelter thanksgiving around 1990. the turkey and pumpkin pie was made prior and the cranberries slid out of a can, but everything else was prepared there. i think that may have been the last time i slept in a shelter.
      2,000 miler
    • JimBlue wrote:

      I've cooked pancakes and scrambled eggs on a camping trip using the aluminum fry pans we had in the Scout mess kits. Temperature is critical as it's easy for frying food to stick or burn in those pans.
      You know, I think we have one of those mess kits down the basement someplace, I'll have to look for it.
      Thanks for solving my problem JimBlue ! :)
    • Dan76 wrote:

      SandyofPA wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
      One egg fry pan, cheap aluminum not real heavy, Walmart and others.
      Coming soon to a campsite near you...Lihikers' version of IHOP.
      In some places, the trees are tapped and connected to tubing. But you would need a large container and a lot of wood to make syrup.
    • WanderingStovie wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      SandyofPA wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
      One egg fry pan, cheap aluminum not real heavy, Walmart and others.
      Coming soon to a campsite near you...Lihikers' version of IHOP.
      In some places, the trees are tapped and connected to tubing. But you would need a large container and a lot of wood to make syrup.
      lol, unless you smuggle in maple syrup from home ya ain't gonna find it at your local IHOP.
      2,000 miler
    • SandyofPA wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
      One egg fry pan, cheap aluminum not real heavy, Walmart and others.
      That's a good idea.
      It's great having a pool of experienced hikers to give advice.
    • Astro wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Yellow Jackets hate it when you go over their homes with a lawnmower. 8o
      and they let ya know it!
      I was surprised once when I attempted to drown them with a garden hose.
      ya gotta do that at night.
      use your red light setting on your headlamp they can't see red. Pour a cup of gas in the hole and put a board or brick over it. The fumes will kill them. I've killed many a nest this way.
      If you want to make it interesting, throw a match in there with the cup of gas. :D
      Come to think of it, with the match less than a cup of gas would probably do the job.
      No, don't light it because sometimes the tunnel to the hive is several feet long and you will not kill the whole hive. Pouring the gas in and covering the hole causes the whole excavation to fill with the fumes and the fumes kill them. I'm allergic/was allergic to them so I've become very good at exterminating them.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • LIhikers wrote:

      JimBlue wrote:

      I've cooked pancakes and scrambled eggs on a camping trip using the aluminum fry pans we had in the Scout mess kits. Temperature is critical as it's easy for frying food to stick or burn in those pans.
      You know, I think we have one of those mess kits down the basement someplace, I'll have to look for it.Thanks for solving my problem JimBlue ! :)

      You're welcome. Those things have burned my food and my hands. So easy does it. Medium coals might be good or a low stove heat. We typically got in a hurry and made mistakes.

      One way we got sick... was to accidentally deep fry pancakes. Urp.
      --
      "What do you mean its sunrise already ?!", me.
    • JimBlue wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      JimBlue wrote:

      I've cooked pancakes and scrambled eggs on a camping trip using the aluminum fry pans we had in the Scout mess kits. Temperature is critical as it's easy for frying food to stick or burn in those pans.
      You know, I think we have one of those mess kits down the basement someplace, I'll have to look for it.Thanks for solving my problem JimBlue ! :)
      You're welcome. Those things have burned my food and my hands. So easy does it. Medium coals might be good or a low stove heat. We typically got in a hurry and made mistakes.

      One way we got sick... was to accidentally deep fry pancakes. Urp.
      You should have made donuts.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      We've never cooked on the trail.
      We only boil water and use it for one of the many things you can make ready with it.
      One Thanksgiving we had the entire feast via freezer bag cooking in Harriman State Park.
      One of these days I want to try and make pancakes.
      I'm keeping my eyes open for a small, flat pan with the edges turned up.
      We use a K-Mart grease pot for boiling water, I've thought maybe I'll get another one of those and cut the sides down until it's in the neighborhood of 3/8 of an inch high. Just enough to keep the pancake batter from running off.
      Here's a picture from the alcohol stoves thread. I used the pan for eggs and pancakes.