Welcome to the AppalachianTrailCafe.net!
Take a moment and register and then join the conversation

Shoes and Socks

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • Shoes and Socks

      I know everyone is different but here's what worked for me on my recent lash. Altra 3.0 shoes. Very comfy no blisters. The factory footbeds did slide around a little on cross sloping trails. This was solved when I replaced them with Meindl inserts from Cabelas. They are the ticket. Mold to your feet, antibacterial and $16. I have also quit using Darn tough socks as they are too tight across the top of my foot at the ankle. I now use Cabelas hiking socks $12-15 all merino wool lifetime warranty and made with a right and left to fit your feet perfectly. Padded where you need it. They are the bomb.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Thanks for sharing JJ, I've got to find a new sock, I have three pair of Smartwool I've worn to the gym every day a pair was clean for several years, got much more than my moneys worth from them, ordered three pair of Smartwool to replace them and they are the pits, thin as silk and about as slippery, they're so thin my shoes feel too big...my last Smartwool purchase.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • JimBlue wrote:

      I try to pick big shoes or boots. Somehow it doesn't work out right and I get one that is just too snug. Fine as long as my feet don't swell up.
      I got a buddy who has two different size feet like a size and then some different from a childhood injury. So when he buys shoes he asks for two different sizes, and then makes a quick switch, can't say as I blame him really, you'd have to know him, but now when I buy shoes I always check the box. :D
    • Drybones wrote:

      mental note wrote:

      And since the thread is called "shoes and socks, and not "socks and shoes" it should be noted that placing ones socks over ones shoes is an old aincient Indian trick to allow one to cross a slippery moss coverd river bottom with out slip slidin' away.
      Those socks must have been darn tough.
      Better off with a cheap pair of dedicated cotton socks for this, the wool won't stretch out over a shoe...without ruining em.
    • mental note wrote:

      And since the thread is called "shoes and socks, and not "socks and shoes" it should be noted that placing ones socks over ones shoes is an old aincient Indian trick to allow one to cross a slippery moss coverd river bottom with out slip slidin' away.
      When using leather boots I'd take them off, pull the insoles out & wear them inside a pair of dirty socks.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Mountain-Mike ().

    • LIhikers wrote:

      mental note wrote:

      And since the thread is called "shoes and socks, and not "socks and shoes" it should be noted that placing ones socks over ones shoes is an old aincient Indian trick to allow one to cross a slippery moss coverd river bottom with out slip slidin' away.
      Actually, here in the 21st century, a pair of Rocket Socks to carry you over the river might be best. :D
      oh jesus yes! :D
    • mental note wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      mental note wrote:

      And since the thread is called "shoes and socks, and not "socks and shoes" it should be noted that placing ones socks over ones shoes is an old aincient Indian trick to allow one to cross a slippery moss coverd river bottom with out slip slidin' away.
      Actually, here in the 21st century, a pair of Rocket Socks to carry you over the river might be best. :D
      oh jesus yes! :D
      Jesus would not have to worry about the slippery river bottom, he would just walk across the top of the water. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I ordered two pair of Smartwool socks a while back and was disappointed cause they were so thin, thought I'd try two brands I've never heard of...Cloudline and Feetures...just got them in the mail and haven't worn them yet but realy like what I see, the Feetures may become my sock of choice...anyone tried either of these brands before?
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge...bought some $39.95 Adidas Galaxy Trail and put a $39.95 insert in them, did a 9.6 mile hike and they were great except for a lack of tongue padding which caused the laces to hurt the top of my foot...may try to engineer some additional padding, did a 19 mile overnighter this past week end using Merrell Moabs, not good, blisters and sore feet.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      I ordered two pair of Smartwool socks a while back and was disappointed cause they were so thin, thought I'd try two brands I've never heard of...Cloudline and Feetures...just got them in the mail and haven't worn them yet but realy like what I see, the Feetures may become my sock of choice...anyone tried either of these brands before?
      How did these socks work for you?

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Drybones wrote:

      I ordered two pair of Smartwool socks a while back and was disappointed cause they were so thin, thought I'd try two brands I've never heard of...Cloudline and Feetures...just got them in the mail and haven't worn them yet but realy like what I see, the Feetures may become my sock of choice...anyone tried either of these brands before?
      I've worn feetures running socks, which are little too thin for me.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Dan76 wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I ordered two pair of Smartwool socks a while back and was disappointed cause they were so thin, thought I'd try two brands I've never heard of...Cloudline and Feetures...just got them in the mail and haven't worn them yet but realy like what I see, the Feetures may become my sock of choice...anyone tried either of these brands before?
      How did these socks work for you?
      IO like them both, no regrets
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Rasty wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      I'm going to try talking my son into taking them the next time I see him...these were top of the line New Balance...they work for a lot of people...too bad I'm not one of them....that's not a bad idea though.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      I'm going to try talking my son into taking them the next time I see him...these were top of the line New Balance...they work for a lot of people...too bad I'm not one of them....that's not a bad idea though.
      You can always donate them for the tax write off. At least you wouldn't have to see them again.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Drybones wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      I'm going to try talking my son into taking them the next time I see him...these were top of the line New Balance...they work for a lot of people...too bad I'm not one of them....that's not a bad idea though.
      Too bad, NB usually works for me and is priced below the brightly colored, media hyped, athlete hawked brands. Suggest donating them to a responsible agency.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Rasty wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      Wash them in holy water.
    • Did some side-by-side comparison of some Altra shoes today that I posted about at that other site, but I thought I would repost here too...

      Lone Peaks have been my everyday sneaker and trail shoe the past few years. I returned a mail order pair of Lone Peak 3.5 today to REI due to size issues.. The 3.5 version is definitely sized smaller than the previous Lone Peaks, so I moved up half a size from my regular size. REI had Superiors, Lone Peaks and Timps in stock, so I gave them all a tryout in the store. My observation....

      Superior: Love the comfort of these shoes, they feel like slippers. I am not looking for a lot of cushion, so I would be happy with these as a trail shoe. You can see from the materials and construction that these shoes would have a short life on the trail, so for economic reasons I gave them a pass. If I could get Superiors at half price I would stock up and just switch out shoes twice as often.

      Timps: I was loving the Timps as first glance, very comfortable. REI has a fake rock to climb to test out shoes, so I put a Lone Peak on one foot and a Timp on the other. On the steep part of the rock the Timp foot suddenly right out from under me. Almost fell on my ass. Thought it was a quirk, but then they did it again. Went home with the Lone Peaks.

      Love the Lone Peaks. If I see a great sale I might stock up on Superiors. Will wait for the next model of the Timp and see if they change the soles at all. By the way, I thought the asymmetric lacing on the Timps made the shoe so comfortable, for my feet anyway. Would like to see some Lone Peaks with lacing like that.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • My only complaints about the Altras is lack of a real toe bumper. I made my own but they always fall off after 50 miles. The other complaint I have is I found my foot wanting to slide sideways inside the shoe when there is a cross slope.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      My only complaints about the Altras is lack of a real toe bumper. I made my own but they always fall off after 50 miles. The other complaint I have is I found my foot wanting to slide sideways inside the shoe when there is a cross slope.
      I'll take the negatives as long as my toes have room to spread out and roam around.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • Drybones wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      I'm going to try talking my son into taking them the next time I see him...these were top of the line New Balance...they work for a lot of people...too bad I'm not one of them....that's not a bad idea though.
      either plant flowers in em, or tie the laces together and toss em over a telephone pole line to live a life of the four seasons.
    • Jake Ace wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      I've been trying to find shoes my feet like, and that's a challenge.......
      My feet have been very happy in Oboz brand shoes for a few years now.They aren't cheap, but happy feet are the foundation of happy hiking.
      I'd rather pay $200 for a pair I like than $20 for a pair I hate...what really pisses me is when I pay $200 for a pair I hate and will not wear...the most expensive pair of running shoes I've bought sits on the basement stairs and haunts me every night when I go downstairs.
      You might bury them in the yard
      I'm going to try talking my son into taking them the next time I see him...these were top of the line New Balance...they work for a lot of people...too bad I'm not one of them....that's not a bad idea though.
      either plant flowers in em, or tie the laces together and toss em over a telephone pole line to live a life of the four seasons.
      Take them to Neel Gap. They won't be lonely. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Shoes might be the most important piece of gear hikers have.
      Take the time to find shoes that make your feet, and the rest of you too, happy.
      This is why I waited to buy new hiking shoes as well as new everyday shoes until I could see Rob at Outdoor 76. Baltimore Jack told me that the best boot/shoe fitter on the trail bar none is Rob at Outdoor 76. I can confirm that he was right. If you can get to Franklin, I strongly recommend that you do!

      Rob is passionate about the right footwear for each hiker. He also strongly recommends that hikers start out with low mileage and ramp up only incremently as too high of mileage or increasing mileage more than a little at a time leads to most of hikers feet, ankle and knee problems.