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It's tarp season

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    • Studying the photo on the MLD site makes me think the bivy isn't attached to the tarp roof but to the edge where the pole support is. And I have that extra cord on the tarp in that spot. So maybe, I'll try that first.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • And here is the same tarp with my roomier bug net inner (12.6 oz). It has a zippered front door and zips down one side for about 3 feet. It also has two mesh pockets and mitten hooks on bungie cord at each end and a loop under the ridge to hang a mini light.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      the borah bivy looks roomier than I thought.
      It's not as room as my DIY, which I can actually change clothes inside of without unzipping it.My DIY is very close to the MLD in size. When I use it with my taro it is the same weight as a single wall tent but the air flow is so much better and although the sleep area is smaller, overall I have much more room under roof for my pack, shoes etc. I think it's at least as storm worthy as a single wall. I'm hooked on traps.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      CoachLou wrote:

      just happen to be in one right now
      Uh Talk about the largest tarp on the AT what is the pack weight?
      Yeah, but he carries it during the day and enjoys it at night, so all the power to him. :thumbup:
      And you gotta love the American flag for the guy born on the 4rh of July!
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • The logistics of getting in the bivy, hanging it up, then zipping it closed is alluding me. Hanging it from the cords attached to the center edge isn't working. Possibly because the cord isn't elastic so I can't stretch it? MLD included extra cords so I'll try them before deciding.

      I dont like the net on my face but will be fine without hanging the foot area.

      It's really hot under the tarp. Just a coincidence because it's a hot day or does CF allow more sunlight through? Thus the transparency?
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      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      The logistics of getting in the bivy, hanging it up, then zipping it closed is alluding me. Hanging it from the cords attached to the center edge isn't working. Possibly because the cord isn't elastic so I can't stretch it? MLD included extra cords so I'll try them before deciding.

      I dont like the net on my face but will be fine without hanging the foot area.

      It's really hot under the tarp. Just a coincidence because it's a hot day or does CF allow more sunlight through? Thus the transparency?
      yep you need elastic cord. Or at least tie a piece of elastic to what you've got so that you get about 6" of stretch or so. If its not raining when I set up I blow up my pad, strap on my quilt and blow up my pillow and then arrange all that inside the bivy before I put it under the tarp. Then just slide the whole thing under the tarp and clip the ends to the loops hanging from the ridge and adjust with linelocs. It will be hot under any tarp or tent in the daytime in summer. Don't climb in until sunset.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • NoAngel wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      The logistics of getting in the bivy, hanging it up, then zipping it closed is alluding me. Hanging it from the cords attached to the center edge isn't working. Possibly because the cord isn't elastic so I can't stretch it? MLD included extra cords so I'll try them before deciding.

      I dont like the net on my face but will be fine without hanging the foot area.

      It's really hot under the tarp. Just a coincidence because it's a hot day or does CF allow more sunlight through? Thus the transparency?
      yep you need elastic cord. Or at least tie a piece of elastic to what you've got so that you get about 6" of stretch or so. If its not raining when I set up I blow up my pad, strap on my quilt and blow up my pillow and then arrange all that inside the bivy before I put it under the tarp. Then just slide the whole thing under the tarp and clip the ends to the loops hanging from the ridge and adjust with linelocs. It will be hot under any tarp or tent in the daytime in summer. Don't climb in until sunset.
      Thanks for the tip.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      The logistics of getting in the bivy, hanging it up, then zipping it closed is alluding me. Hanging it from the cords attached to the center edge isn't working. Possibly because the cord isn't elastic so I can't stretch it? MLD included extra cords so I'll try them before deciding.

      I dont like the net on my face but will be fine without hanging the foot area.

      It's really hot under the tarp. Just a coincidence because it's a hot day or does CF allow more sunlight through? Thus the transparency?
      Awesome set up from the photos... as for you questions... TJ you are in a unusual territory.
      There was an Old Man with a owl,
      Who continued to bother and howl;
      He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
      Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.WOO
    • The tent I used before switching to a hammock was pretty nice, really nothing more than a small tarp with built in bug net and bathtub floor, two doors and a place to hang a pack was nice...really miss that set up, especially when setting up or packing up in the rain.
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      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • What's the best sequence for pitching a rectangular tarp? Stake along one edge then attach support poles, then stake the other edge?

      I thought that's what I did the first time and it was fast and easy but the second time took a while and was awkward with the poles falling over and having to adjust every stake to tighten it up.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      What's the best sequence for pitching a rectangular tarp? Stake along one edge then attach support poles, then stake the other edge?

      I thought that's what I did the first time and it was fast and easy but the second time took a while and was awkward with the poles falling over and having to adjust every stake to tighten it up.
      A high wind and driving rain would make for a challenge, have not had to set my hammock/tarp up in the rain yet...and not looking forward to it...especially with a high wind... it was never a problem with the tent I used.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      The tent I used before switching to a hammock was pretty nice, really nothing more than a small tarp with built in bug net and bathtub floor, two doors and a place to hang a pack was nice...really miss that set up, especially when setting up or packing up in the rain.
      I like the pack hanger
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • NoAngel wrote:

      stake the two rear corners and then rear ridge. Stake front corners and then front ridge. Stake middle of sides. Go around and adjust as necessary.
      Actually what I do is stake one corner, then put the ridge pole in, hold the ridge pole in place with one hand and reach over and stick the other corner in.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • NoAngel wrote:

      NoAngel wrote:

      stake the two rear corners and then rear ridge. Stake front corners and then front ridge. Stake middle of sides. Go around and adjust as necessary.
      Actually what I do is stake one corner, then put the ridge pole in, hold the ridge pole in place with one hand and reach over and stick the other corner in.
      Whew, good to know. Thought I was being stupid because staking each corner made the tarp too taut to lift the ridge pole.

      Problem...my arms aren't long enough to hold the ridge pole and stake the corner. I had to let go and it kept falling over.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      NoAngel wrote:

      NoAngel wrote:

      stake the two rear corners and then rear ridge. Stake front corners and then front ridge. Stake middle of sides. Go around and adjust as necessary.
      Actually what I do is stake one corner, then put the ridge pole in, hold the ridge pole in place with one hand and reach over and stick the other corner in.
      Whew, good to know. Thought I was being stupid because staking each corner made the tarp too taut to lift the ridge pole.
      Problem...my arms aren't long enough to hold the ridge pole and stake the corner. I had to let go and it kept falling over.
      Well it will let you gauge about where the stake needs to go by having the pole the height you want it. After you get it all staked out, stand back and the line off each ridge and the ridge should all be in a straight line. Show us some pics.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      About to spend my first night under the tarp. Excited and scared. Have always had 4 walls surrounding me. Here's to new adventures.
      Where you headed...I would like to join my son and d-i-l on their Roan Highlands hike this week end but I did something really, really, really stupid at the gym a few weeks back and my torn meniscus is acting up and I leave for the Tetons next Saturday so I'm trying to let it heal...hope it goes well, which I know it will.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      About to spend my first night under the tarp. Excited and scared. Have always had 4 walls surrounding me. Here's to new adventures.
      Where you headed...I would like to join my son and d-i-l on their Roan Highlands hike this week end but I did something really, really, really stupid at the gym a few weeks back and my torn meniscus is acting up and I leave for the Tetons next Saturday so I'm trying to let it heal...hope it goes well, which I know it will.
      Hiked on the Cumberland Trail.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I did some things right and did some things wrong last night.

      What I did right...chose the perfect conditions and the perfect place for the maiden voyage. No one around so didn't worry about being a noob and didn't deal with rain.

      What I did wrong...everything else. :)

      Didn't add mitten hooks to the tarp for the bugnet and had to use those stupid tI shepherds stakes because my daughter took my other ones to a music festival. Had to set up in the dark and didn't realize the ground was sloped.

      It was breezy so I would get a tie-out staked, start on another, and the previous stake would come out of the ground. It took a little bit but finally got it fixed.

      The bugnet...Considered sleeping on top of it until I saw all the granddaddy long legs crawling around. It was rigged to stay off my face with an extra line but didn't work very well. I slept good until 2:30 and woke up with my face against the side of the tarp as I'd rolled a few inches down the slope. The sleeping pad and bug net had traveled also and the the pad was no longer under me but standing on its side and the bug net zipper under my shoulder.

      Not succumbing to panic, the zipper was located and everything was set to rights.

      I slept good again but woke at 6:30 to the same situation and was very grateful that no one was around as a witness.

      Overall, I slept better than normal (mainly because of the temp) and learned what to do before the next trip.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 3 times, last by Bo Peep ().

    • Drybones wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      About to spend my first night under the tarp. Excited and scared. Have always had 4 walls surrounding me. Here's to new adventures.
      Where you headed...I would like to join my son and d-i-l on their Roan Highlands hike this week end but I did something really, really, really stupid at the gym a few weeks back and my torn meniscus is acting up and I leave for the Tetons next Saturday so I'm trying to let it heal...hope it goes well, which I know it will.
      Oh no. Didnt that happen to you last year also? Thought you had it fixed. Hopefully it doesn't screw up your hike.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      About to spend my first night under the tarp. Excited and scared. Have always had 4 walls surrounding me. Here's to new adventures.
      Where you headed...I would like to join my son and d-i-l on their Roan Highlands hike this week end but I did something really, really, really stupid at the gym a few weeks back and my torn meniscus is acting up and I leave for the Tetons next Saturday so I'm trying to let it heal...hope it goes well, which I know it will.
      Oh no. Didnt that happen to you last year also? Thought you had it fixed. Hopefully it doesn't screw up your hike.
      Had a third of the meniscus removed from the right knee, the left has the same issue but seemed to have healed itself...as long as I'm not stupid.... was in a circuit breaker class and one of the stations was doing spinning round house kicks to a dummy, meniscus tears result from the foot being stationary and the knee turning, would have been okay doing the kicks bare footed but the shoes I had on gripped too well and the foot did not turn, I knew better than to do these, knew even better to stop when the first pain started....I just hate to cop out on exercises...and I have a lot of injuries to show for it.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Drybones wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Drybones wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      About to spend my first night under the tarp. Excited and scared. Have always had 4 walls surrounding me. Here's to new adventures.
      Where you headed...I would like to join my son and d-i-l on their Roan Highlands hike this week end but I did something really, really, really stupid at the gym a few weeks back and my torn meniscus is acting up and I leave for the Tetons next Saturday so I'm trying to let it heal...hope it goes well, which I know it will.
      Oh no. Didnt that happen to you last year also? Thought you had it fixed. Hopefully it doesn't screw up your hike.
      Had a third of the meniscus removed from the right knee, the left has the same issue but seemed to have healed itself...as long as I'm not stupid.... was in a circuit breaker class and one of the stations was doing spinning round house kicks to a dummy, meniscus tears result from the foot being stationary and the knee turning, would have been okay doing the kicks bare footed but the shoes I had on gripped too well and the foot did not turn, I knew better than to do these, knew even better to stop when the first pain started....I just hate to cop out on exercises...and I have a lot of injuries to show for it.
      DB, you are a stubborn ole' cuss. ^^
      It's not copping out, it's keeping yourself healthy for better things.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Drybones wrote:

      Had a third of the meniscus removed from the right knee, the left has the same issue but seemed to have healed itself...as long as I'm not stupid.... was in a circuit breaker class and one of the stations was doing spinning round house kicks to a dummy, meniscus tears result from the foot being stationary and the knee turning, would have been okay doing the kicks bare footed but the shoes I had on gripped too well and the foot did not turn, I knew better than to do these, knew even better to stop when the first pain started....I just hate to cop out on exercises...and I have a lot of injuries to show for it.
      Usually those operations heal quickly, one should hope! - What is a circuit breaker class?
      There was an Old Man with a owl,
      Who continued to bother and howl;
      He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
      Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.WOO