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The National Park Centennial

    • Drybones wrote:

      I doubt that 95% of the native visitors to these places are refused admittance.
      And this is the sole reason for my opinion that it should be limited to Americans. The same logic should apply to in-state tuition at universities. Citizens of my state are regularly refused admittance to college while out of state students are allowed in. A NC citizen pays for the college through their taxes but is refused attendance because someone that didn't pay state taxes is admitted.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Part of a recent e-mail from the AMC, we're members......................

      Last week was the 100th anniversary of the National Parks.And President Obama marked the occasion with an historic action – thedesignation of a brand new national monument.
      The new Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument in northernMaine is an 87,000 acre area in the Maine Woods on lands east of Baxter StatePark.
      The land is located between Baxter State Park and the EastBranch of the Penobscot River and was donated to the National Park Service byElliotsville Plantation, Inc., a Maine family foundation. It’s a spectaculararea between Baxter State Park and the East Branch of the Penobscot River,which has long been recognized for its ecological, recreational, and culturalimportance to Maine and beyond.
      outdoors.org/articles/amc-outd…913985&tr=y&auid=16918183


      I guess now Baxter State Park will be able to divest itself of the AT and the trail can be routed into this new national park.
      It seems to be anti-climatic to end a 2200 mile hike on the bank of a river, or in the middle of no where.
      We'll see, only time will tell.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by LIhikers ().

    • LIhikers wrote:

      Part of a recent e-mail from the AMC, we're members......................

      Last week was the 100th anniversary of the National Parks.And President Obama marked the occasion with an historic action – thedesignation of a brand new national monument.
      The new Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument in northernMaine is an 87,000 acre area in the Maine Woods on lands east of Baxter StatePark.
      The land is located between Baxter State Park and the EastBranch of the Penobscot River and was donated to the National Park Service byElliotsville Plantation, Inc., a Maine family foundation. It’s a spectaculararea between Baxter State Park and the East Branch of the Penobscot River,which has long been recognized for its ecological, recreational, and culturalimportance to Maine and beyond.
      outdoors.org/articles/amc-outd…913985&tr=y&auid=16918183


      I guess now Baxter State Park will be able to divest itself of the AT and the trail can be routed into this new national park.
      It seems to be anti-climatic to end a 2200 mile hike on the bank of a river, or in the middle of no where.
      We'll see, only time will tell.
      Anti-climatic, is that like against the wind?
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      I might visit SNP next weekend. There are so many great national parks, I want to see them all. Of the ones I have visited my favorites are: Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Zion and Mesa Verde. Yosemite would probably be my favorite, but I haven't been there YET. Same for Glacier. I have one of the shirt pocket size NP guides and a pocket size passport stamp collector book for the national parks and I'm gonna fill that thing up.
      I just purchased one. I'm thinking about mailing it to family throughout the country so they can participate in filling it up...they can sign their name next to the stamp, maybe add a photo(?)

      My sister is going to get one for her 9 yr old grandson. They had a discussion recently about not buying things but making memories instead.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • uncle meat wrote:

      My votes for Yosemite...nothing like it, it's damn near surrealistic. I can't imagine (but through his works ) what John Muir must have felt when he crested a hill and saw the valley...talk about winning the lottery.
      You bring up a great point. We go places because we know they are supposed to beautiful and awesome. But imagine what it was like for guy who is just out there and sees it the first time with out that expectation.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      uncle meat wrote:

      My votes for Yosemite...nothing like it, it's damn near surrealistic. I can't imagine (but through his works ) what John Muir must have felt when he crested a hill and saw the valley...talk about winning the lottery.
      You bring up a great point. We go places because we know they are supposed to beautiful and awesome. But imagine what it was like for guy who is just out there and sees it the first time with out that expectation.
      I recall reading the account of the first non natives to see yosemite valley. A group of soldier were pursuing a band of Indians through the Sierra. They came over a hill near where the Tunnel View overlook is now and basically said "oh crap", but with much more flowery 19th century language.
    • uncle meat wrote:

      My votes for Yosemite...nothing like it, it's damn near surrealistic. I can't imagine (but through his works ) what John Muir must have felt when he crested a hill and saw the valley...talk about winning the lottery.
      Agee that Yosemite is amazing, but I recall thinking while driving out the south exit of Yellowstone having just finished my first visit, that Yellowstone was really special and the one thing that made Yellowstone special was that there wasn't one thing that made Yellowsone special. More than any park, I felt that Ystone was greater than the sum of its parts and in that way it's attraction is more subtle.
    • When John Colter (first white man known to discover Yellowstone) returned to civilization and described seeing the boiling mud pots and geysers people thought he had gone nuts.

      When you read the description of the land and the wildlife in Undaunted Courage you get an idea of how magnificent this country was before it was settled and developed.

      If you have an interest in that time period some good reads IMHO are:

      Undaunted Courage

      John Colter – His Years In The Rockies

      Give Your Heart To The Hawks
      The will of God will never take you where the grace of God will not protect you.

      The post was edited 3 times, last by montana mac ().

    • odd man out wrote:

      uncle meat wrote:

      My votes for Yosemite...nothing like it, it's damn near surrealistic. I can't imagine (but through his works ) what John Muir must have felt when he crested a hill and saw the valley...talk about winning the lottery.
      Agee that Yosemite is amazing, but I recall thinking while driving out the south exit of Yellowstone having just finished my first visit, that Yellowstone was really special and the one thing that made Yellowstone special was that there wasn't one thing that made Yellowsone special. More than any park, I felt that Ystone was greater than the sum of its parts and in that way it's attraction is more subtle.
      I understand, it is quite an expansive place.