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Is this a good boot at a good price ?

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    • Is this a good boot at a good price ?

      I was looking up some old links of gear I had glanced at last year. I was wondering if these Hi-Tec Men's Altitude IV Hiking Boot was a good boot at a good price. The boots I used last year and this are 12 extra-wides. They don't cushion my toes going down hill.

      I was thinking about getting 13 EE boots. Length isn't a problem, but width is. I simply cannoy afford custom size boots. I have to go with off the shelf boots.

      Are these okay ?

      amazon.com/gp/product//B000RUG…r_dp_update?ie=UTF8&psc=1

      Thanks. ?(
      --
      "What do you mean its sunrise already ?!", me.
    • JimBlue wrote:

      I was looking up some old links of gear I had glanced at last year. I was wondering if these Hi-Tec Men's Altitude IV Hiking Boot was a good boot at a good price. The boots I used last year and this are 12 extra-wides. They don't cushion my toes going down hill.

      I was thinking about getting 13 EE boots. Length isn't a problem, but width is. I simply cannoy afford custom size boots. I have to go with off the shelf boots.

      Are these okay ?

      amazon.com/gp/product//B000RUG…r_dp_update?ie=UTF8&psc=1

      Thanks. ?(
      Are you sure you really want a boot?
      Try trail runners and your feet will probably thank you everyday, at least mine do. :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Boot/shoe fit different people in differnt ways. What works for me may not work for you. It's not something y can take a friends reccomendation on. Something you have to find out for yourself. One thing I do advise is to get a good insole & replace the one that comes with the boot. I'm talking super feet or spenco, not Doc Shoals.
    • To protect your toes going downhill the shoe or boot needs to have a good toe box preferable a bumper on the front like Keens. Also lacing your shoe/boot so your foot does slide forward will help. My toes always eventually seem to take a beating. The lacing still is more important if you are hiking something like the Grand Canyon- there a 2 day hike can have my toes looking like a month on the AT.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Ideally, buy footwear that you try on first rather than mail order an unknown. There are too many things that need to be right.

      Even though you're on a budget, go to different stores and try on a bunch to see what features work best for you. If you find a pair you like, note the name, model, size, and keep a close eye out for sales. If you wait a while, when the next season's model comes out, the previous season is discounted. Sometimes you can find shoes from two season's ago and really get a steal. Find a coupon too and you can save a lot of money. Most places occasionally offer free shipping, especially around Christmas. I bought my current pair of work shoes (Brooks running shoes) for $45...normally $100+.

      Trail running shoes are great because you have the comfort of a running shoe but with a stiffer bottom and reinforced toe for rocks.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Traffic Jam ().

    • LIhikers wrote:

      JimBlue wrote:

      The boots I used last year and this are 12 extra-wides. They don't cushion my toes going down hill.
      I don't think any boot cushions toes when going down hill. To keep your toes from hitting the front of the boot depends on how the boot fits, and just as important, how you lace them up .
      I've read that here and elsewhere about lacing and box front of a boot.

      Also I've read recently about digging in the heel going down hill instead of placing the toe first. Of course, that wont work on solid rock.

      My current boots were tried on in a store. I even thumped them against the shelf to see if my toes hit.

      I don't have a problem fitting my foot length, its the width increase when I walk or hike that is my big problem. I have thought about, as mentioned in my OP, to buy a longer boot than I need, lace it up well, and hopefully not smack my big toe into it as i walk down hill. My second toe isn't much shorter than my big toes, but it seems like its out there by itself when I stub my foot on a rock or tree root.

      This particular boot I've linked to does have a rubber bumper part of the sole on the front of it. My current boot doesn't have that. Its more of a 'standard look' boot.

      I do try to find sales, but with so many things going on like transporting my sister's kids to various things, can get in the way of doing things I want to. I'll see what I can do. I think some web sites will email me about sales for stores in my area.
      --
      "What do you mean its sunrise already ?!", me.
    • I personally like boots, but I've been wearin' to work for 30 + years. That said I wouldn't want to log long miles in them, if I'm wearing boots on a hike it's cause I'm takin' my time with not a care in the world. I pretty much don't even give an opinion on shoes/boots anymore cause like many have discovered it's very subjective...whatever feels right to the wearer. Then again, if I've worn a particular shoe/boot I can speak to the Construction and longevity of tread.