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Chronic Lyme... stuff to avoid...

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    • Chronic Lyme... stuff to avoid...

      news.health.com/2016/03/31/stu…ase-chronic-lyme-disease/
      By Steven Reinberg
      HealthDay Reporter
      WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) — People with persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease are unlikely to find relief from longer-term antibiotic therapy, according to a new Dutch study.
      Although antibiotics are the correct therapy to treat Lyme disease when it is diagnosed early, longer-term use appears ineffective against the symptoms linked to the tick-borne illness and may carry the risk of side effects, the researchers said.
      “Most patients with Lyme disease are cured after initial antibiotic therapy. But, up to 20 percent of patients report persistent symptoms, such as muscular or joint pain, fatigue or concentration problems, despite initial antibiotic therapy,” said study senior researcher Dr. Bart-Jan Kullberg. He is a professor of infectious diseases at Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
      Treating these patients with longer courses of antibiotics has been controversial, Kullberg said. “Previous clinical trials have not shown that prolonged antibiotic treatment has beneficial effects in patients with persistent symptoms attributed to Lyme disease. Nonetheless, the debate about this issue has continued,” he said.
      The major conclusion from this new study is that three months of antibiotic therapy does not provide additional benefits to patients reporting persistent symptoms of pain, fatigue or mental confusion, he said.
      “These patients need customized care, not just a prescription for antibiotics,” Kullberg said.
      The study findings were published March 31 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
      The debate over what’s often called chronic Lyme disease dates back almost as far as the discovery of the illness 40 years ago. Many sufferers insist that chronic Lyme is a very real disease. But many medical experts say the symptoms could be those of an undiagnosed illness in patients.
      The new study included 280 patients in Europe who suffered from symptoms such as muscle and joint pain, fatigue and concentration problems, and were previously diagnosed with Lyme disease.
      During the first two weeks of the trial, all the patients were given the antibiotic ceftriaxone (Rocephin). Then they were randomly divided into three groups. The first group was given the antibiotic doxycycline (Doryx) for 12 weeks; the second group was given a combination of the antibiotics clarithromycin (Biaxin) and hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil); and the third group was given a placebo.
      Before and after treatment, the patients completed questionnaires about their symptoms, their fitness level, quality of life and well-being, Kullberg said. Patients answered the questions after 26, 40 and 52 weeks. They also took memory tests and used a pedometer to record their movement, he said.
      The researchers found no clear differences between the groups at any of these evaluations.
      Despite these findings and others, some groups believe that antibiotics are the treatment for what is sometimes called chronic or late-stage Lyme disease. For example, the Global Lyme Alliance says: “Late-stage Lyme may be treated with combinations of oral, injected (shots) or intravenous antibiotics over extended periods.”
      However, the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends against using antibiotics to treat the symptoms.
      One Lyme disease researcher said he doubts that most patients with so-called chronic Lyme disease ever had Lyme disease in the first place.
      “In my experience most of the patients I see who carry a diagnosis of chronic Lyme didn’t have any evidence of ever having Lyme,” said Dr. Gary Wormser, director of the Lyme Disease Diagnostic Center at Boston Children’s Health Physicians in Valhalla, N.Y.
      “My hope is that studies would focus on trying to find out what’s causing these symptoms, and coming up with a better treatment approach,” said Wormser, who is a spokesman for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. “These patients are suffering, and we need much more research into this area.”
      Phillip Baker is executive director of the American Lyme Disease Foundation. He said the results of the new study mesh with results of four U.S. National Institutes of Health-supported clinical trials that showed extended antibiotic therapy was of no benefit for the treatment of Lyme disease syndromes that “some people refer to as ‘chronic Lyme disease.'”
      Baker added, “Obviously, in the case of Lyme disease, it is not prudent to treat with antibiotics until all symptoms disappear as recommended by some.”
      Lyme disease is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by a tick. The disease is characterized by a red “bulls-eye” rash.
      Only a small proportion of people with a tick bite actually develop Lyme disease, the study authors said. In many patients, the disease is cured completely by treatment with antibiotics lasting between 10 days and four weeks, the researchers said.
      In some cases, late onset of the disease can occur if the infection isn’t detected at an early stage or is not treated with antibiotics, the study authors said.
      Dr. Paul Auwaerter is a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and co-author of an accompanying editorial in the journal. “This is the fifth trial to date that has not suggested patients benefit from extra antibiotics,” he said. “This is contrary to what is often a popular practice of some physicians.”
      The prolonged use of antibiotics can be dangerous, Auwaerter said. “Antibiotics can have collateral damage. They can disturb your natural microbiome—that is the good bacteria that are in the body. Some antibiotics have side effects, including allergies and irritation of the liver,” he added.
      Antibiotics probably aren’t the right treatment for persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease, Auwaerter said.
      His advice is to “work with a doctor who is willing to roll up his sleeves to find the most accurate diagnosis for your condition, and individualize therapy based on that diagnosis.”
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • The problem with this study is they only treat with antibiotics that are effective against the spirochete form of the Borrelia. Most Lyme literate Dr.'s are combining antibiotics with medications to combat the cystic form of the bacteria (like Flagyl). And dare I say the study did not include any treatment that would attack the (controversial) biofilms.

      Long term treatment using combinations of antibiotics to attack all the forms of the bacteria seems to offer slow success against chronic Lyme disease. (At least antidotally from the people receiving these treatments from the few Lyme literate Dr.s who have not blindly followed the CDC recommendations.

      Attempting to support and stimulate the bodies natural immune system seems to be key also.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • There is a new game going on to add to this dilemma Doxycycline oral is the preferred to treatment Doxycycline is a broad-spectrum, bacteriostatic antibiotic used to treat a variety of diseases. For many indications, Doxycycline is one of several options available for patients. However, for Rickettsial infections, Doxycycline is the treatment of choice. No data are available to recommend Minocycline as an equally effective alternative to Doxycycline for any of the diseases mentioned. Additionally, the spectrum of adverse effects with Minocycline is higher than that for Doxycycline. Tetracycline may be a suitable alternative for some diseases and indications; however, a similar shortage of tetracycline has been reported. There continues to be a shortage for inject able Doxyclcline since 2012.

      Prior to 2012 you would receive 30 oral for 15-30 days upon finding a ring around a bite... now you are luck to get a 5 day treatment.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • 1600 + miles on the AT and no tick bites. One day of yard work and I get a nasty infected tick bite. Carefully pulled that little blood sucker off yesterday morning and this morning it was hurting and itching and swollen and crusty and infected. Went to Patient First and they put me on antiboitics. Too soon to tell or test for Lymes. It was a very small tick about the size of a pin head. Dark tick
      Here's a pic from yesterday and this morning . Bit me kind of behind and above the kneeappalachiantrailcafe.net/index…620f4d67a3243f6b08d0888d1
      Images
      • 20170628_132424.jpg

        49.75 kB, 800×480, viewed 45 times
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Here is another rub of "Rhubarb Pie" many companies are gathering some 3 million + dollars per year to "treat" your yard with essential oils. Cedar, Garlic ...etc.

      Cedar has some good science behind it... I am having trouble replicating this in my yard and several others. Clearly it will not reduce mosquitoes and I am still doing different kind of tests.
      Why question the intentions of a road-crossing chicken?
    • I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back
      Do you think the spray permethrin will do the job? I picked some up from REI after the tick incident.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back
      Do you think the spray permethrin will do the job? I picked some up from REI after the tick incident.
      Absolutely. I spray my shoes, socks (except sleeping socks) , gators, pants, hiking shirts, pack, tarp, bivy, and ground sheet. No ticks on the trail in five years. I watched one crawl on my pants once while on break and then he fell off dead. I'm sold on the stuff.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Sprayed my skirt, pants, day pack, backpack, shoes, and two pair socks. Waiting for my main hiking shirt to dry then should have enough to spray it also. Hoping I don’t kill any little animals (except ticks).
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I had four on me last week after hiking on the Cumberland Trail near chattanooga. Two of the bites have been itchy snd slow to heal. It sucks cuz every blemish looks like a tick and every itch feels like a tick.

      Its time to treat my hiking clothes. Thinking about treating my tent also.
      Treat your pack too. Think all the times you set it on the ground and then pick it up and put it on your back
      Do you think the spray permethrin will do the job? I picked some up from REI after the tick incident.
      Absolutely. I spray my shoes, socks (except sleeping socks) , gators, pants, hiking shirts, pack, tarp, bivy, and ground sheet. No ticks on the trail in five years. I watched one crawl on my pants once while on break and then he fell off dead. I'm sold on the stuff.
      Same here. With the extra winter clothes, this summer is the first time I used two boxes.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General