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Knead Bread

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    • Knead Bread

      It looks like I have a new hobby, bread making. Its really fun to make and homemade bread is much healthier than commercial. I've learned a lot in the past few weeks, especially about fermentation.

      I ordered fresh, sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour and can't wait to start feeding it.

      Has anyone made bread while hiking?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Would love to hear your experiences with this in the field. Sounds like it would take more time and effort than I am willing to put in, but I would certainly love some fresh, warm bread at the end of the day. I get sick of tortillas after a while.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      It looks like I have a new hobby, bread making. Its really fun to make and homemade bread is much healthier than commercial. I've learned a lot in the past few weeks, especially about fermentation.

      I ordered fresh, sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour and can't wait to start feeding it.

      Has anyone made bread while hiking?
      I do quick breads (bannock, biscuits, muffins, churros, etc.) fairly often. I've tried yeast breads, they're too much work on the trail and there's never a good surface to knead on, unless someone tells me a clever solution to that.
      I'm not lost. I know where I am. I'm right here.
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      It looks like I have a new hobby, bread making. Its really fun to make and homemade bread is much healthier than commercial. I've learned a lot in the past few weeks, especially about fermentation.

      I ordered fresh, sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour and can't wait to start feeding it.

      Has anyone made bread while hiking?
      I do quick breads (bannock, biscuits, muffins, churros, etc.) fairly often. I've tried yeast breads, they're too much work on the trail and there's never a good surface to knead on, unless someone tells me a clever solution to that.
      amazon.com/Foldable-Cutting-Ch…rds=roll+up+cutting+board
      If your Doctor is a tree, you're on acid.
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      It looks like I have a new hobby, bread making. Its really fun to make and homemade bread is much healthier than commercial. I've learned a lot in the past few weeks, especially about fermentation.

      I ordered fresh, sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour and can't wait to start feeding it.

      Has anyone made bread while hiking?
      I do quick breads (bannock, biscuits, muffins, churros, etc.) fairly often. I've tried yeast breads, they're too much work on the trail and there's never a good surface to knead on, unless someone tells me a clever solution to that.
      I was particularly interested in yeast bread.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      It looks like I have a new hobby, bread making. Its really fun to make and homemade bread is much healthier than commercial. I've learned a lot in the past few weeks, especially about fermentation.

      I ordered fresh, sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour and can't wait to start feeding it.

      Has anyone made bread while hiking?
      I do quick breads (bannock, biscuits, muffins, churros, etc.) fairly often. I've tried yeast breads, they're too much work on the trail and there's never a good surface to knead on, unless someone tells me a clever solution to that.

      Sure. A long number of years ago I was reading a magazine. The bread recipe used the typical ingredients, yeast being one of them. Dissolve the yeast. Add that water into the other ingredients, barely mix the flour, egg, yeast and milk. Put the batter in a bread pan. Let rise until just above the top of the pan. Thump it once so it falls. Let rise again. I had it covered with a damp dish towel. Bake.

      Don't knead the dough ! Otherwise it will be tough to chew. I used whole wheat flour, and got accused of making a cake or using cake flour. I didn't and It was bread.
      --
      "What do you mean its sunrise already ?!", me.
    • Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • I like bread - white, whole wheat, sourdough, King's Hawaiian kingshawaiian.com/products/original-hawaiian-sweet/

      I thought maybe calories could be reduced by cutting back the sweet part, but I thought the yeast might need something to make the bread rise. But it looks like the sweetener is a small percentage of the recipe.
      I am human and I need to be loved - just like everybody else does
    • Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.

      Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.
      Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      That makes sense as I try to use minimal sugar, I don't like sweet bread. In fact, I rejected several recipes because of the sugar content.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      That makes sense as I try to use minimal sugar, I don't like sweet bread. In fact, I rejected several recipes because of the sugar content.
      Flour also has sugar in the form of complex carbohydrates which yeast consumes. Lean doughs (dough made from water, flour, yeast and salt) often have trouble being baked after being frozen. Lean bread is better made fresh.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.
      Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      Asked and answered.

      Sugar is fuel for the fermentation (rising) process. Don't forget sugar is converted to ethanol and CO2.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      HUH what... Yeast has a comfort zone warmer than room temp... yea - its all about turning sugar into gas. Really good pizza dough is Proofed for three days, prior to use. If you don't proof the bread.. it tastes as bland as frozen.
      There was an Old Man with a owl,
      Who continued to bother and howl;
      He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
      Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.WOO
    • Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      HUH what... Yeast has a comfort zone warmer than room temp... yea - its all about turning sugar into gas. Really good pizza dough is Proofed for three days, prior to use. If you don't proof the bread.. it tastes as bland as frozen.
      Fresh yeast is sold ice cold. Yeast is perfectly fine frozen.

      Slowly fermenting dough under refrigeration is called retarding. Proofing is done at room temperature+

      Only pan or Sicilian pizza is proofed. Normal pizza goes from retarded to oven with only a very short window between the two stages while the cook stretches the dough and tops it.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      HUH what... Yeast has a comfort zone warmer than room temp... yea - its all about turning sugar into gas. Really good pizza dough is Proofed for three days, prior to use. If you don't proof the bread.. it tastes as bland as frozen.
      I've made some really good pizza dough in just a few hours.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Rasty wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      I will try to process this when I'm not so tired.Question...I put some dough in the freezer before the 2nd rising. I let it thaw yesterday then let it rise. It only rose about 1/3 the amount it should have and the bread turned out flattish and dense. Did I kill the yeast somehow?
      freezing doesn't kill yeast. One possible reason is the yeast didn't have enough sugar to eat after the first rising to overcome being frozen then thawed with enough energy to rise again. The flat and dense could also show that the dough was still partially frozen when baked.
      HUH what... Yeast has a comfort zone warmer than room temp... yea - its all about turning sugar into gas. Really good pizza dough is Proofed for three days, prior to use. If you don't proof the bread.. it tastes as bland as frozen.
      Fresh yeast is sold ice cold. Yeast is perfectly fine frozen.
      Slowly fermenting dough under refrigeration is called retarding. Proofing is done at room temperature+

      Only pan or Sicilian pizza is proofed. Normal pizza goes from retarded to oven with only a very short window between the two stages while the cook stretches the dough and tops it.
      Yea we are on the same recipe page.
      There was an Old Man with a owl,
      Who continued to bother and howl;
      He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
      Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.WOO
    • I've done yeast bread several times on the trail. Only with a group when weight of more cooking gear can be justified. If only two I may compromize & do a yeast dough as a fry bread. Adding some beans and cheese makes a hearty dinner along with some soup. fried in oil it adds calories.

      For actual baking I use a bakepacker. Once you play with it I find the top not needed. For two I might bring 10 skillet wich gives enough room to knead the dough. The nonstick helps. I've tried the Backpaker Magazine method of using a gallon zip lock & might do after a few days in the woods, but as much as i tried to get an even knead, no such luck. Another consern is fuel. if fire & time is no concern it not as much of an issue. 30-40 minutes on a stove...Another reason for fry bread. You get a nice crust & more calories with less fuel. Throw some sugar or honey on it for even more calories. May not get as many style points ass real yeast bread, but still never got complaints!
    • Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      Even better, learn what proper dough feels like, because the amount of liquid you need (or the amount of extra flour it'll take in while kneading) depends on the humidity among other factors. (You might have to judge differently if you're making industrial quantities the way Rasty does. I'm not a chef, I don't know those techniques.)
      I'm not lost. I know where I am. I'm right here.
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Learn baking percentages

      Everything is weighed against the weight of the flour.

      Flour always is 100%. If using two flours as a blend then their wrought equals 100%.

      Water is from 50% to 65% of the flours weight. More water equals a more lively dough.

      Yeast is 1/2 to 1-1/2%

      Salt 1 to 2%

      Fat 2 to 5%

      Sweet 2 to 5%

      This building block system allows you to figure out the why and how's of bread baking.

      Even better, learn what proper dough feels like, because the amount of liquid you need (or the amount of extra flour it'll take in while kneading) depends on the humidity among other factors. (You might have to judge differently if you're making industrial quantities the way Rasty does. I'm not a chef, I don't know those techniques.)
      Absorption rate is what this is called. The moisture content of the flour is crucial. This is the number one reason why we weigh ingredients and don't use volume measurements. Fresh flour will have much more moisture in it then 12 month old flour.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • I do reccomnd a bread machine to anyone who lives on the grid. For under $100 fresh preservitive free bread when you want it. Most have times so it can be ready when you wake up. It won't stay long without preservative, but I never found that to be an issue. Just put ingredient in in proper order & set timer. Kinda like a crock pot. If anyone needs recipies I have a decent amount of them in word format.
    • Mountain-Mike wrote:

      I do reccomnd a bread machine to anyone who lives on the grid. For under $100 fresh preservitive free bread when you want it. Most have times so it can be ready when you wake up. It won't stay long without preservative, but I never found that to be an issue. Just put ingredient in in proper order & set timer. Kinda like a crock pot. If anyone needs recipies I have a decent amount of them in word format.
      I used one until it no longer functioned. Raisin cinnamon bread was the favorite of the teacher's lounge crowd. I'd put the ingredients in the night prior and set the timer.

      I need to get a replacement unit.

      Lest we forget.....



      SSgt Ray Rangel - USAF
      SrA Elizabeth Loncki - USAF
      PFC Adam Harris - USA
      MSgt Eden Pearl - USMC
    • Rasty wrote:

      Absorption rate is what this is called. The moisture content of the flour is crucial. This is the number one reason why we weigh ingredients and don't use volume measurements. Fresh flour will have much more moisture in it then 12 month old flour.
      When you're weighing the flour, how do you have any idea what the moisture content is, to know how much liquid to use? Just curious. If I'm making a loaf or three, I can feel the dough and adjust, but I don't know what a commercial baker might do.
      I'm not lost. I know where I am. I'm right here.
    • I've recetly looked into them again. Just a little over the rating for inverter i now have. Time kneading isn't so much of an issue as when I lived a "normal life". Brought it up thinking of last time I visited Dad at his cabin. He was upset with locally bought bread. It molded after a few days. I was like, NS it will spoil in a week or less. No preservatives common on store bought. When I suggested a bread machine they thought they had one,,,some where.
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      Rasty wrote:

      Absorption rate is what this is called. The moisture content of the flour is crucial. This is the number one reason why we weigh ingredients and don't use volume measurements. Fresh flour will have much more moisture in it then 12 month old flour.
      When you're weighing the flour, how do you have any idea what the moisture content is, to know how much liquid to use? Just curious. If I'm making a loaf or three, I can feel the dough and adjust, but I don't know what a commercial baker might do.
      You can feel the moisture content in your hand and adjust the water up or down based on that. With experience you know how much water to add or withhold.
      Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.
      Dr. Seuss Cof123
    • Mountain-Mike wrote:

      I do reccomnd a bread machine to anyone who lives on the grid. For under $100 fresh preservitive free bread when you want it. Most have times so it can be ready when you wake up. It won't stay long without preservative, but I never found that to be an issue. Just put ingredient in in proper order & set timer. Kinda like a crock pot. If anyone needs recipies I have a decent amount of them in word format.
      I would love that way too much. My dad was a baker before he became a carpenter and general contractor. I grew up on fresh bread. I have much more of a weakness for breads than sweets.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      It looks like I have a new hobby, bread making. Its really fun to make and homemade bread is much healthier than commercial. I've learned a lot in the past few weeks, especially about fermentation.

      I ordered fresh, sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour and can't wait to start feeding it.

      Has anyone made bread while hiking?
      I do quick breads (bannock, biscuits, muffins, churros, etc.) fairly often. I've tried yeast breads, they're too much work on the trail and there's never a good surface to knead on, unless someone tells me a clever solution to that.
      I just use my armpit and kneed while I walk, don't forget to flour pit first or its kinda messy.
    • Mountain-Mike wrote:

      I've recetly looked into them again. Just a little over the rating for inverter i now have. Time kneading isn't so much of an issue as when I lived a "normal life". Brought it up thinking of last time I visited Dad at his cabin. He was upset with locally bought bread. It molded after a few days. I was like, NS it will spoil in a week or less. No preservatives common on store bought. When I suggested a bread machine they thought they had one,,,some where.
      I'll probably consider a bread machine after the novelty of making it myself wears off.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Bo Peep ().

    • AnotherKevin wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:


      I do quick breads (bannock, biscuits, muffins, churros, etc.) fairly often. I've tried yeast breads, they're too much work on the trail and there's never a good surface to knead on, unless someone tells me a clever solution to that.
      Yea remember those Dollar Store cutting boards that a 12x15 flexible cutting sheet of thick plastic... it doubles as a pack stiffener and can be cut to size and weighs next to nothing. Doubles as a lunch plate too.
      There was an Old Man with a owl,
      Who continued to bother and howl;
      He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
      Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.WOO