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    • I’m a little further than round 2 but not much. The pattern requires a very specific manipulation of the yarns to create a double knitted (reversed color) effect. It’s very tricky and this pattern is double knitted brioche which is even harder. It’s slow going.
      Images
      • 51BC08C2-0DEC-4552-8C71-E2017D3E094F.jpeg

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      Lost in the right direction.
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      Although I’m not competing, I’m attempting to knit the next round’s pattern and it’s extremely challenging, It’s this (see pic ) on steroids. In 2 days, I’ve made it through two rows. :)

      Between knitting and practicing for a Scots-Irish festival, I’m a bit stressed these days. Need to go hiking.
      Wow, that's complicated! They look like something I've seen on a tattoo
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Our old refrigerator was looking rather decrepit. Rather than replace it my frugal wife dressed it up by peeling the labels off my craft beer cans and wallpapering it.



      I love it when our interests collide.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      Our old refrigerator was looking rather decrepit. Rather than replace it my frugal wife dressed it up by peeling the labels off my craft beer cans and wallpapering it.



      I love it when our interests collide.
      Ours used to be covered with magnets and photos, but since the current one is stainless steel and matches the oven and dishwasher, the magnets and photos have now been limited to the sides.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • It’s been 5 years since I started playing the fiddle, unbelievable!

      This week, my Weekly Inspiration is, “Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try.” Before you know it, 5 years has gone and you’re nearly proficient.

      I can’t believe I’ve kept with it for 5 years, The violin is incredibly difficult but the journey has been totally worth it.

      I’ve also started playing the ukulele, its easy and so much fun. It’s the perfect campfire instrument…my fiddle is too precious to expose to extreme temps and humidity but an inexpensive ukulele is perfect, and not very loud.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      It’s been 5 years since I started playing the fiddle, unbelievable!

      This week, my Weekly Inspiration is, “Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try.” Before you know it, 5 years has gone and you’re nearly proficient.

      I can’t believe I’ve kept with it for 5 years, The violin is incredibly difficult but the journey has been totally worth it.

      I’ve also started playing the ukulele, its easy and so much fun. It’s the perfect campfire instrument…my fiddle is too precious to expose to extreme temps and humidity but an inexpensive ukulele is perfect, and not very loud.
      So when do we get a performance?
      You tube is your friend
    • Back in the day, I played bass and guitar in a few bands. Everything pretty much went into storage when I went to college. Then kids came along and I sold my bass amp to buy a bike rack.

      When we moved, the new house had a formal living room. And since we're pretty informal folks, my wife offered it to me as a music room. Since then, I've added a new guitar and bass, picked up a new bass head, and made a pedal board for the guitars. It's a lot of fun to fire everything up and spend an hour noodling and improving my skills. I've since learned that I'm suffering from GAS - Gear Acquisition Syndrome. My neighbors are listening to good music. Whether they like it or not.

      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Carter Notch NH

      The post was edited 1 time, last by StalkingTortoise ().

    • Sixth stringed instrument from the left (A bass), very unique!
      I played drums in church for a few years and also had GAS. Except I'd buy the unfinished shells and finish them myself, put on lugs and strainers and such as I saw fit. I also have two(!) electronic kits somewhere.
      Pirating – Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    • rhjanes wrote:

      Sixth stringed instrument from the left (A bass), very unique!
      I played drums in church for a few years and also had GAS. Except I'd buy the unfinished shells and finish them myself, put on lugs and strainers and such as I saw fit. I also have two(!) electronic kits somewhere.
      30+ years ago, I finally got back to the garage where my last band practiced to retrieve my bass amp and miscellaneous gear. A few items had gone missing over the years and my guitarist felt bad. He looked around and offered a Fender fretless bass neck as compensation. Turns out it was a good deal for me, as it's now worth close to $1000. I guess Fender stopped making fretless necks for 1970's vintage basses in.... the 70's.

      I had thoughts of buying a compatible bass and making the fretless conversion but I think I'm going to offer it for sale and make some bassist very happy to have found an unobtanium 1974 neck in perfect condition.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Carter Notch NH
    • Back in the early 60's Dad bought my brother a Fender Stratocaster. This was before they started making them in Japan and they were still a quality instrument. Dang if that thing didn't become a collectors item.

      I gave the guitar about an hour before I decided it wasn't for me. I figured every hour I spent on the guitar was an hour I wouldn't be playing basketball. Easy choice for me.
      2,000 miler
    • max.patch wrote:

      Back in the early 60's Dad bought my brother a Fender Stratocaster. This was before they started making them in Japan and they were still a quality instrument. Dang if that thing didn't become a collectors item.

      I gave the guitar about an hour before I decided it wasn't for me. I figured every hour I spent on the guitar was an hour I wouldn't be playing basketball. Easy choice for me.
      Spent about a year playing the guitar when I was young, but have not touched one in nearly 50 years. Do somewhat regret that at this point I could not play anything. Would have been nice to be able to pick one up and play just one song for old times sake. But still not worth it at this point in the game. Plus probably not the most arthritic friendly hobby.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • max.patch wrote:

      Back in the early 60's Dad bought my brother a Fender Stratocaster. This was before they started making them in Japan and they were still a quality instrument. Dang if that thing didn't become a collectors item.

      I gave the guitar about an hour before I decided it wasn't for me. I figured every hour I spent on the guitar was an hour I wouldn't be playing basketball. Easy choice for me.
      Most Fenders are now made in Mexico. I paid a premium to get one from the Coronado California shop. But damn... it's a beaut in a bourbon blast finish. Mmmmmmm....bourbon.

      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Carter Notch NH
    • StalkingTortoise wrote:

      Back in the day, I played bass and guitar in a few bands. Everything pretty much went into storage when I went to college. Then kids came along and I sold my bass amp to buy a bike rack.

      When we moved, the new house had a formal living room. And since we're pretty informal folks, my wife offered it to me as a music room. Since then, I've added a new guitar and bass, picked up a new bass head, and made a pedal board for the guitars. It's a lot of fun to fire everything up and spend an hour noodling and improving my skills. I've since learned that I'm suffering from GAS - Gear Acquisition Syndrome. My neighbors are listening to good music. Whether they like it or not.


      Nice collection! I'm jealous. I sold all my guitars and gear after my kids were born.
      Although I never stopped playing,now I just have a Yamaha Acoustic.
      its all good
    • Learning new songs today is so much easier than the old tried & true method of dropping a needle onto vinyl, finding notes / chords, and repeating as required.

      For example, I can play the bass line for the Police song Roxanne but wanted to learn the guitar chords. Experimenting with standard chords got me started but my ear told me that something was missing. Did a quick Google search and found a youtube instructor that offers lessons on many popular rock songs. Not only did I have access to the correct chord structures, I received a greater appreciation for guitarist Andy Summers' genius. Some youtube instructors go a step further and include amp / effects settings to nail the perfect tone.

      Having my guitars and basses set up and convenient makes it easy to pick 'em up and practice. Adding tuner pedals also makes it a breeze to tune up before playing. My skills have significantly improved over the past 12 months thanks to daily practice sessions.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Carter Notch NH
    • I have a couple of friends with GAS (Guitar Acquisition Syndrome). It definitely puts a strain on the marriages.

      I have a Gibson, made in 1941 back when the company was still in Kalamazoo MI (they have since moved to Nashville).
      I've owned it since about 1970. If it were a guitar or mandolin in good condition from that era it would be worth megabucks.
      Unfortunately it's a cello. Gibson made orchestral string instruments for just a few years around that time.
      Mine is one of only 40 cellos made. Fewer than that still exist as I've seen a few posts online of people who have one that is in pieces.
      Of the few that are in playable condition, some of those are in museums or collections, so even fewer are owned by people who actually play them.

      Here is one that was for sale at Elderly Instruments in Lansing. BTW, Elderly is one of the most famous guitar stores in the country.
      elderly.com/products/gibson-g-110-1241-4-4-c-1940

      This guy collects all sorts of Gibson instruments. He as two cellos.
      This one (serial number 741) indicating it was the seventh one made in 1941. I have its sibling (841) - the next one made (and is prettier too).
      gibson-prewar.com/gibson-1941-cello-vc-110/
    • The acoustic on the far right is an early 50's Gibson J-45. It was my Dad's and he left it to my oldest sister. She gave it to me for safekeeping while she's living in Italy.

      I toured the Gibson factory in Memphis around 20 years ago. Pretty cool place to see piles of guitar necks in the process of being hand shaped.
      Trudgin' along the AT since 2003. Completed Sections: Springer Mountain to Winding Stair Gap NC, and Max Patch NC to Carter Notch NH
    • Went skiing for the first time in a few years yesterday.
      Beautiful day, T-shirt weather by the afternoon.

      This is the view of Mount Washington (and the Mount Washington Resort) from the Bretton Woods Ski slopes.


      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • We used to ski quite a bit, but I think my knees have retired me from that sport. Mostly Colorado, but I've been up in your area, Killington, 3 times. Stayed at a nearby condo, Mt Meadows Lodge, and The Inn At The Long Trail (I'm obviously a hiker). The last time I went was when one of my sons wanted to try snow boarding so I took him to a little bump of a mountain in Alabama 2 hours from the house that offers both skiing and boarding.

      It no longer exists, but Atlanta used to have a "ski resort" in the late 70's early 80's where you could ski. It was astro turf covered with little plastic pellets. I went once and that was enough. There was a restaurant/bar which overlooked the slope and I can imagine the people coming to laugh at the skiers.

      Did a quick google search; the slope was 630-680 feet long and 60 feet wide.
      2,000 miler
    • My father was an 'organ voicer.' He would shape and tune organ pipes. His specialty was reed pipes for Aeolian Skinner organs. There probably weren't more than a dozen people in the world who knew his craft, but in the 1960's he was at the top of the game. He had a 'perfect pitch' ear and his services were highly sought after.

      He tuned the organ at Saint John the Divine in NYC and the Mormon Tabernacle among others. He did not like to travel, so after a while he only voiced church organs if they would ship the pipes to him in heavy wooden boxes. A single job might take several months. He worked down in our basement. My house was filled with the sound of the pipes growing up.

      When I was a little boy he would pay me a quarter an hour to work with him. I would polish the reeds or bend the tuning wires. He had these molds, jigs and German Silver tools for forming the parts. They were all worn and ancient, probably dated to the early 1800's. When I was older I graduated to cutting the sheet metal per his instructions on a heavy metal press.

      My father died suddenly when I was 16. After the funeral people in the organ industry kept calling on my mother. They desperately wanted his notes so they could know how he did what he did. I doubt his notes would have helped them much. They were just a stack of index cards in a recipe box with numbers and strange symbols on them. It looked like he wrote the notes in a secret code.

      My mother sold everything in the basement to one of the organ guys; the notes, the tools, the press, and the organ for $500. She was a young widow and had five children to feed. I was too young and self-centered back then to ask my father much about his life. Yes, that is a deep regret. My father dropped out of High School to enlist in WWII and got married and had kids on his return so it is a bit of a mystery to me how he learned his craft.

      Teach your children well!
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • For the past five years between graduation and Christmas I drive over to North Carolina to pick up my dad and take him to Florida to visit his remaining brother and sister for his birthday (all in their 80s and 90s and no longer able to drive). I have learned so many stories and details about him and my family I never knew before those road trips.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • New

      I’m finally back at bluegrass camp after a 2 year delay for crappy Covid. It’s been wonderful, amazing, and inspirational!

      I worked really hard to prepare, practicing 3 hrs/day on fiddle tunes, chords, and backup, and can finally keep up in the jams. My hands sometimes shake from fear so my intonation isn’t great but I’m playing with confidence. Let me tell you…you just have to belt it out, even if you mess up! None of this meek, squeaky, timid crap.
      Lost in the right direction.
    • New

      LIhikers wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I’m finally back at bluegrass camp after a 2 year delay for crappy Covid. It’s been wonderful, amazing, and inspirational!
      That's good to hear, but makes me wonder when we're going to get to hear your talent. There must be a way to make that happen.
      My playing isn’t exactly “talent”, it’s more of an
      attempt to extract a decent sound from the devil’s instrument. :)

      I have issues with recording. It never sounds as good unless you listen with headphones and when I do record myself, I can’t play without making mistakes. It’ll sound great until I press that stupid button then everything falls to pieces. This is a common problem that a lot of people in my FB group complain about.
      Lost in the right direction.