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    • Wise Old Owl wrote:

      SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      I've used a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Dawn dish detergent on a couple of Scouts and their equipment after such skunk experiences.
      I did some asking around beforehand and the consensus was that a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide, some baking soda, and 1-2tsp of blue dawn was the best option. I just didn't think the cat would tolerate it.0
      There is some confusion here. Dawn is a liquid sufactant for getting oil off ducks in a spill, and would not be of much help in removing skunk spray. Hydrogen Peroxide is mild enough for pets - but can discolour hair, and is moderatly effective. An Odor remover as I recommended above with an ingredient with Triclosan will destroy chemically any bacteria, Triclosan is used in hospitals for flesh eating bacteria, it is used in toothpaste to destroy Halitosis. It is used in better products for human scent removal.
      CLICK
      Skunk spray is a glandular secretion in a fatty-oil delivery base. The odor is caused by thiols and derivatives of thiols. Oxidation of the thiols will change them to non-odiferous compounds. The safest oxidizer that works effectively is the most common oxidizer, H2O2. H2O2 is Hydrogen Peroxide. Dawn is the perfect medium to dissolve and disperse the oil and the H2O2 is the perfect medium to destroy the thiols. Voila. Skunk spray scent all gone.

      Triclosan is an antibacterial. It is a phenol, not an oxidizer. It has no direct effect on thiols by themselves, but has an effect on cells whose walls are thiol composed/dependent. Thiols are not bacteria. Oxidization effects thiols. Bad breath is due to bacteria. Skunk spray stinks because of chemicals, not living organisms....a thiol is a sulfur analog of alcohol, not a living organism.
    • ScareBear wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      I've used a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Dawn dish detergent on a couple of Scouts and their equipment after such skunk experiences.
      I did some asking around beforehand and the consensus was that a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide, some baking soda, and 1-2tsp of blue dawn was the best option. I just didn't think the cat would tolerate it.0
      There is some confusion here. Dawn is a liquid sufactant for getting oil off ducks in a spill, and would not be of much help in removing skunk spray. Hydrogen Peroxide is mild enough for pets - but can discolour hair, and is moderatly effective. An Odor remover as I recommended above with an ingredient with Triclosan will destroy chemically any bacteria, Triclosan is used in hospitals for flesh eating bacteria, it is used in toothpaste to destroy Halitosis. It is used in better products for human scent removal.CLICK
      Skunk spray is a glandular secretion in a fatty-oil delivery base. The odor is caused by thiols and derivatives of thiols. Oxidation of the thiols will change them to non-odiferous compounds. The safest oxidizer that works effectively is the most common oxidizer, H2O2. H2O2 is Hydrogen Peroxide. Dawn is the perfect medium to dissolve and disperse the oil and the H2O2 is the perfect medium to destroy the thiols. Voila. Skunk spray scent all gone.
      Triclosan is an antibacterial. It is a phenol, not an oxidizer. It has no direct effect on thiols by themselves, but has an effect on cells whose walls are thiol composed/dependent. Thiols are not bacteria. Oxidization effects thiols. Bad breath is due to bacteria. Skunk spray stinks because of chemicals, not living organisms....a thiol is a sulfur analog of alcohol, not a living organism.
      I will take that idea and run with it... But from several trials and OMG I get it.. I just know what works in real trials with my dogs. I did not see a molecule of fatty stuff in the diagrams. So if I add some peroxide.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      I've used a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Dawn dish detergent on a couple of Scouts and their equipment after such skunk experiences.
      I did some asking around beforehand and the consensus was that a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide, some baking soda, and 1-2tsp of blue dawn was the best option. I just didn't think the cat would tolerate it.0
      There is some confusion here. Dawn is a liquid sufactant for getting oil off ducks in a spill, and would not be of much help in removing skunk spray. Hydrogen Peroxide is mild enough for pets - but can discolour hair, and is moderatly effective. An Odor remover as I recommended above with an ingredient with Triclosan will destroy chemically any bacteria, Triclosan is used in hospitals for flesh eating bacteria, it is used in toothpaste to destroy Halitosis. It is used in better products for human scent removal.CLICK
      Hey, maybe the cat would enjoy being a blonde. :D
      After all, blondes do have more fun, right?
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      I've used a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Dawn dish detergent on a couple of Scouts and their equipment after such skunk experiences.
      I did some asking around beforehand and the consensus was that a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide, some baking soda, and 1-2tsp of blue dawn was the best option. I just didn't think the cat would tolerate it.0
      There is some confusion here. Dawn is a liquid sufactant for getting oil off ducks in a spill, and would not be of much help in removing skunk spray. Hydrogen Peroxide is mild enough for pets - but can discolour hair, and is moderatly effective. An Odor remover as I recommended above with an ingredient with Triclosan will destroy chemically any bacteria, Triclosan is used in hospitals for flesh eating bacteria, it is used in toothpaste to destroy Halitosis. It is used in better products for human scent removal.CLICK
      Hey, maybe the cat would enjoy being a blonde. :D
      After all, blondes do have more fun, right?
      That is what Rod Stewart told us back in the 80s.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      I've used a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Dawn dish detergent on a couple of Scouts and their equipment after such skunk experiences.
      I did some asking around beforehand and the consensus was that a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide, some baking soda, and 1-2tsp of blue dawn was the best option. I just didn't think the cat would tolerate it.0
      There is some confusion here. Dawn is a liquid sufactant for getting oil off ducks in a spill, and would not be of much help in removing skunk spray. Hydrogen Peroxide is mild enough for pets - but can discolour hair, and is moderatly effective. An Odor remover as I recommended above with an ingredient with Triclosan will destroy chemically any bacteria, Triclosan is used in hospitals for flesh eating bacteria, it is used in toothpaste to destroy Halitosis. It is used in better products for human scent removal.CLICK
      Hey, maybe the cat would enjoy being a blonde. :D
      After all, blondes do have more fun, right?
      That is what Rod Stewart told us back in the 80s.
      growing up in south florida and learning to surf -- i put "suddenly summer" in my hair one summer to get that blonde surfer look.
      2,000 miler
    • ScareBear wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      SarcasmTheElf wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      I've used a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Dawn dish detergent on a couple of Scouts and their equipment after such skunk experiences.
      I did some asking around beforehand and the consensus was that a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide, some baking soda, and 1-2tsp of blue dawn was the best option. I just didn't think the cat would tolerate it.0
      There is some confusion here. Dawn is a liquid sufactant for getting oil off ducks in a spill, and would not be of much help in removing skunk spray. Hydrogen Peroxide is mild enough for pets - but can discolour hair, and is moderatly effective. An Odor remover as I recommended above with an ingredient with Triclosan will destroy chemically any bacteria, Triclosan is used in hospitals for flesh eating bacteria, it is used in toothpaste to destroy Halitosis. It is used in better products for human scent removal.CLICK
      Skunk spray is a glandular secretion in a fatty-oil delivery base. The odor is caused by thiols and derivatives of thiols. Oxidation of the thiols will change them to non-odiferous compounds. The safest oxidizer that works effectively is the most common oxidizer, H2O2. H2O2 is Hydrogen Peroxide. Dawn is the perfect medium to dissolve and disperse the oil and the H2O2 is the perfect medium to destroy the thiols. Voila. Skunk spray scent all gone.
      Triclosan is an antibacterial. It is a phenol, not an oxidizer. It has no direct effect on thiols by themselves, but has an effect on cells whose walls are thiol composed/dependent. Thiols are not bacteria. Oxidization effects thiols. Bad breath is due to bacteria. Skunk spray stinks because of chemicals, not living organisms....a thiol is a sulfur analog of alcohol, not a living organism.
      Hey maybe we can agree on all this - I just know what works. - I catch skunks for a living.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Hey maybe we can agree on all this - I just know what works. - I catch skunks for a living.
      Better you than me I guess. If I had that job I believe I would have to go Johnny Paycheck on it. :rolleyes:
      You may be shocked - I charge $189 for first catch. I lay out three traps and attempt to capture the male and females in spring heat. $ 85-95 for 2nd 3rd etc, depending on distance. Honest sometimes I loose money in this program due to overhead and nightvision hunting cameras. I do not get skunked - yet

      There are a lot of rules and regulations and licenses. GO figure.
      Numerous studies suggest that eating a single steak significantly increases the vulnerability to consuming the warm entrails of a freshly killed hitchhiker. Gateway Cannibals!
    • Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Hey maybe we can agree on all this - I just know what works. - I catch skunks for a living.
      Better you than me I guess. If I had that job I believe I would have to go Johnny Paycheck on it. :rolleyes:
      You may be shocked - I charge $189 for first catch. I lay out three traps and attempt to capture the male and females in spring heat. $ 85-95 for 2nd 3rd etc, depending on distance. Honest sometimes I loose money in this program due to overhead and nightvision hunting cameras. I do not get skunked - yet
      There are a lot of rules and regulations and licenses. GO figure.
      I live trapped 13 skunks last year and 14 skunks this year. I have chickens and honey bees, both skunk magnets. Skunks may be legally harvested in Michigan if they bother livestock. No skunk survived the encounter. I've never been sprayed.
      bacon can solve most any problem.
    • sheepdog wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      Wise Old Owl wrote:

      Hey maybe we can agree on all this - I just know what works. - I catch skunks for a living.
      Better you than me I guess. If I had that job I believe I would have to go Johnny Paycheck on it. :rolleyes:
      You may be shocked - I charge $189 for first catch. I lay out three traps and attempt to capture the male and females in spring heat. $ 85-95 for 2nd 3rd etc, depending on distance. Honest sometimes I loose money in this program due to overhead and nightvision hunting cameras. I do not get skunked - yetThere are a lot of rules and regulations and licenses. GO figure.
      I live trapped 13 skunks last year and 14 skunks this year. I have chickens and honey bees, both skunk magnets. Skunks may be legally harvested in Michigan if they bother livestock. No skunk survived the encounter. I've never been sprayed.
      Glad you have never been sprayed, and I hope that is a streak that is never broken for you.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Much discussion has taken place amongst trappers as to the best way to keep a skunk from spraying upon dispatch, head shot, heart shot, tail shot, even pick up by tail. For all intents and purposes and for all you mechanicals types out there, let's just say it's sphincter (so to speak) is not...normally closed :D

      BirdBrain knows...where you at my ole fine featherd friend...hope all's swell. :)

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Socks ().

    • I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      Did you forget to rosin up your bow?
    • ScareBear wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      Did you forget to rosin up your bow?
      and play your fiddle hard...
      bacon can solve most any problem.
    • sheepdog wrote:

      ScareBear wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      Did you forget to rosin up your bow?
      and play your fiddle hard...
      c'mon guys...TJ doesn't live in georgia.
      2,000 miler
    • max.patch wrote:

      sheepdog wrote:

      ScareBear wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      Did you forget to rosin up your bow?
      and play your fiddle hard...
      c'mon guys...TJ doesn't live in georgia.
      I don't think her name is Johnny either.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      Probably like hiking gear, sometimes properly investing a little more money in the right thing makes a big difference.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      It's quite remarkable really that there seem to be only one type of wood in the world that can make a world-class violin bow (Pernambuco) and that it comes from Brazil. It seems that with deforestation, Pernamubuco trees are endangered and trade in Pernambuco timber is restricted, so the future of the modern bow is in doubt. My stick is French (Geroges Francois Lotte) and probably worth more than my cello (made by the Gibson Guitar Company of Kalamazoo, strangely enough).
    • odd man out wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      It's quite remarkable really that there seem to be only one type of wood in the world that can make a world-class violin bow (Pernambuco) and that it comes from Brazil. It seems that with deforestation, Pernamubuco trees are endangered and trade in Pernambuco timber is restricted, so the future of the modern bow is in doubt. My stick is French (Geroges Francois Lotte) and probably worth more than my cello (made by the Gibson Guitar Company of Kalamazoo, strangely enough).
      Hey, this is the 21st century, they'll just start making them out of plastic :(
    • LIhikers wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      It's quite remarkable really that there seem to be only one type of wood in the world that can make a world-class violin bow (Pernambuco) and that it comes from Brazil. It seems that with deforestation, Pernamubuco trees are endangered and trade in Pernambuco timber is restricted, so the future of the modern bow is in doubt. My stick is French (Geroges Francois Lotte) and probably worth more than my cello (made by the Gibson Guitar Company of Kalamazoo, strangely enough).
      Hey, this is the 21st century, they'll just start making them out of plastic :(
      There are no plastic substitutes. Fiberglass bows are common, cheap and crappy. Carbon fiber bows are expensive and pretty good. The only substitute for Pernambuco so far is another wood called Ipe. This tree grows faster so it is a promising sustainable substitute. The frog is made of ebony which is also in short supply. The tip was traditionally clad in ivory and that is also now not allowed.
    • odd man out wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      I've been really unhappy with my violin bow. It's been sliding on the strings so I decided to take it to a luthier and have it rehaired. He said it's a cheap piece of Chinese-made crap and not to waste my money but save it for a better bow.

      After conferring with my teacher and sleeping on it, I am now the proud and delighted owner of a 1920's G.A. Pfretzschner pernambuco bow.

      It will set me back a while on my violin upgrade but I'm so, so happy. gif.014.gif
      It's quite remarkable really that there seem to be only one type of wood in the world that can make a world-class violin bow (Pernambuco) and that it comes from Brazil. It seems that with deforestation, Pernamubuco trees are endangered and trade in Pernambuco timber is restricted, so the future of the modern bow is in doubt. My stick is French (Geroges Francois Lotte) and probably worth more than my cello (made by the Gibson Guitar Company of Kalamazoo, strangely enough).
      Hey, this is the 21st century, they'll just start making them out of plastic :(
      There are no plastic substitutes. Fiberglass bows are common, cheap and crappy. Carbon fiber bows are expensive and pretty good. The only substitute for Pernambuco so far is another wood called Ipe. This tree grows faster so it is a promising sustainable substitute. The frog is made of ebony which is also in short supply. The tip was traditionally clad in ivory and that is also now not allowed.
      My choice was ultimately narrowed down to two bows, a carbon fiber bow and the wood bow. I have a decent ear and the difference in sound between the two was unmistakable. I had to have the wood bow. It has an ivory tip, ebony frog, and silver wrap. I suppose I'm not very PC.

      I keep thinking...if my bow could tell it's story, what would it be?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • The performance is fast approaching and I'm working hard to keep negative thoughts out of my head. There will be professional musicians in the audience as they take the stage after us and one of the two mics is going to be right in front of my violin.

      Drybone's message keeps playing in my head...either I'll play good or I'll be so bad that people will laugh, either way, the audience will be happy. :)
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis