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its that time again.. wore out my hiking sneekers.

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    • its that time again.. wore out my hiking sneekers.

      Ok they may have been trail Running shoes, I am partial to Solomon and a few others but I have to buy a new pair - I just wore out the last one with a separation. Three weeks ago I was stealth night hiking on chip stone in a nearby park. I thought I took a tumble on something that tripped me. Turns out the separation of the toe box brought me down my left hand looks like a balloon, three weeks immobile.



      OK, help me out if you can - knobby tread & light - not some new balance or Wally world. What holds up for u?

      I was looking at the Solomon and discovered the dropped the heal box this year.... not sure about this.
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • WOO,

      I can only tell you what I like. These shoes right here...

      amazon.com/Altra-Mens-Trail-Ru…&keywords=lone+peak+altra

      Lone Peak shoes by Altra. The super wide toe box is great, my toes have never been happier,. Really comfortable, no break in time.

      The negatives, well these are 'zero drop' shoes, which are not for everyone. I have grown to like it, but your mileage may vary. The second negative, my previous pair of Lone Peaks did not last very long, just about 400 miles. I liked the comfort so much, I still bought another pair. This version (V2.5) seems a bit sturdier. Time will tell how long they last.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      WOO,

      I can only tell you what I like. These shoes right here...

      amazon.com/Altra-Mens-Trail-Ru…&keywords=lone+peak+altra

      Lone Peak shoes by Altra. The super wide toe box is great, my toes have never been happier,. Really comfortable, no break in time.

      The negatives, well these are 'zero drop' shoes, which are not for everyone. I have grown to like it, but your mileage may vary. The second negative, my previous pair of Lone Peaks did not last very long, just about 400 miles. I liked the comfort so much, I still bought another pair. This version (V2.5) seems a bit sturdier. Time will tell how long they last.
      4-500 miles is fairly common before they start to break down. i have yet to wear out a pair of soles on my lasportiva ultraraptors,but the midsole starts to go around 4-500 miles
      its all good
    • My Brooks Cascadias were good for over 500 miles this summer. Unfortunately I did get not get my replacement shoes until over 600 miles :thumbdown: . But with Gorilla Tape I made it (Thanks Again Coach Lou :thumbup: ).

      Please note this included all of PA (Rockslvania). I already have bought 2 more pairs on sale since I got back. One for this spring, and another pair for the 460 miles I plan to do this summer.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Rasty wrote:

      JimBlue wrote:

      what is 'zero drop' ? Thanks.
      running shoes without a heel that is thicker then the front part of the sole
      Uhh yea I saw that... had absolutely no idea what to make of it. wait its labeled "fashion" must make it OK right?


      Seriously same stuff was in this years Solomon... I will get back to you on this.
      Be wise enough to walk away from the nonsense around you! :thumbup:
    • I currently wear Oboz Sawtooth every day and have a few hikes in them. They are ventilated trail shoes not trail runners. I too have heard good things about the Altra Lone Peak and drove all over town to find a pair to try on. As IMS said they are a bit different with their wide toe box and zero drop. I think I will try a pair myself but will probably wait until the spring hiking season.
    • I just order my third effing pair of shoes, trying to find one that works. My problem is my feet start hurting around mile 6-7 and I'm gritting my teeth by mile 9. Its a general achiness that starts on the part of my foot below my toes and is worse if there is a lot of descending. The pain then travels to my entire foot and lower legs.

      One of my days on my planned BMT hike is 15+ miles. I’m very worried.

      Overuse is my diagnosis as I’m on my feet for most of my 12 hr shifts. Plus, I’ve worn nothing but old chaco’s all summer and think that has done some harm.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      I just order my third effing pair of shoes, trying to find one that works. My problem is my feet start hurting around mile 6-7 and I'm gritting my teeth by mile 9. Its a general achiness that starts on the part of my foot below my toes and is worse if there is a lot of descending. The pain then travels to my entire foot and lower legs.

      One of my days on my planned BMT hike is 15+ miles. I’m very worried.

      Overuse is my diagnosis as I’m on my feet for most of my 12 hr shifts. Plus, I’ve worn nothing but old chaco’s all summer and think that has done some harm.
      You are in the medical field, so you probably have better professional advice around you (or from your own training and professional experience).

      That given I will share a few things from me personally FWIW just in case. Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC has a guy in their store who has a reputation for being really good at recommending shoes. I personally had a positive experience with him. So if you ever make it down that way you might want to drop in. I now wear custom orthotics with Brooks Adrenaline most of the time. Wear Rockports for my "dress" shoes (my wife says they are old man shoes, but hey I am getting well seasoned ;) ). For hiking I wear Brooks Cascadia with Superfeet (used to be Blue, this summer switched to Green). And worst of all for a South Florida boy, I try to NOT go bare foot anymore :( . Sometimes I guess hiking is more important than casual freedom. :rolleyes:

      Now my symptoms are different than yours, but there is something there that might help. I know with my plantar fasciitis stretching was a big help. Not for sure that would help your situation, but stretching is usually a good thing.

      I wish you well, because hiking with foot pain can drain the fun away! :)
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I just order my third effing pair of shoes, trying to find one that works. My problem is my feet start hurting around mile 6-7 and I'm gritting my teeth by mile 9. Its a general achiness that starts on the part of my foot below my toes and is worse if there is a lot of descending. The pain then travels to my entire foot and lower legs.

      One of my days on my planned BMT hike is 15+ miles. I’m very worried.

      Overuse is my diagnosis as I’m on my feet for most of my 12 hr shifts. Plus, I’ve worn nothing but old chaco’s all summer and think that has done some harm.
      You are in the medical field, so you probably have better professional advice around you (or from your own training and professional experience).
      That given I will share a few things from me personally FWIW just in case. Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC has a guy in their store who has a reputation for being really good at recommending shoes. I personally had a positive experience with him. So if you ever make it down that way you might want to drop in. I now wear custom orthotics with Brooks Adrenaline most of the time. Wear Rockports for my "dress" shoes (my wife says they are old man shoes, but hey I am getting well seasoned ;) ). For hiking I wear Brooks Cascadia with Superfeet (used to be Blue, this summer switched to Green). And worst of all for a South Florida boy, I try to NOT go bare foot anymore :( . Sometimes I guess hiking is more important than casual freedom. :rolleyes:

      Now my symptoms are different than yours, but there is something there that might help. I know with my plantar fasciitis stretching was a big help. Not for sure that would help your situation, but stretching is usually a good thing.

      I wish you well, because hiking with foot pain can drain the fun away! :)

      Some of my issue might be plantar fasciatis but they don't hurt until I've been on my feet for a while. I don’t sit very much at work.

      I got Cascadias today and they feel pretty good. A previous pair didn't work because they rubbed my bunion but these dont seem to do that. I plan to wear them all day at work tomorrow to see how they do.

      They are ugly as all get out. I mean UGLY. But if the shoe fits... :)
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      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      I just order my third effing pair of shoes, trying to find one that works. My problem is my feet start hurting around mile 6-7 and I'm gritting my teeth by mile 9. Its a general achiness that starts on the part of my foot below my toes and is worse if there is a lot of descending. The pain then travels to my entire foot and lower legs.

      One of my days on my planned BMT hike is 15+ miles. I’m very worried.

      Overuse is my diagnosis as I’m on my feet for most of my 12 hr shifts. Plus, I’ve worn nothing but old chaco’s all summer and think that has done some harm.
      Hi TJ,

      As Astro said, I also recommend going to Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC. Baltimore Jack told me that Rob, the owner, is the best footwear fitter on the trail. After my visit to the store in March, I totally believe it. He is totally and I mean totally knowledgable about feet and what is best for them. He measured my feet in a number of different ways, when you're standing, straight-legged, bent knees, etc, etc. He watched me walk. Tried on about a half dozen different pairs until we found the right ones. He explained that the most important fit is around the heel. He shares his knowledge freely with everyone. He is a really cool guy!

      I bought 2 pair, one for hiking: Hoka Speedgoat 2 and one for everyday (that Rob told me I could also use for hiking): Brooks Dyad 9. So, I've had them for 6 months and LOVE both pair. I've worn the Hokas on 2 hiking trips, just awesome! Two weeks ago I severely injured my right foot and while I normally wear dress shoes to work, the Brooks with their wide toe box and stylish looks, were very comfortable while my foot healed.

      So, even if you don't need a new pair of shoes, if you are ever within a short drive to Franklin, go to Outdoor 76 and ask for Rob to fit you for a pair. And when you do need a new pair, you're close enough to Franklin that I STRONGLY recommend that you go to Outdoor 76 and ask for Rob. Might be a good idea to call in advance to confirm that he will be there and set up an appointment. Your appointment will not be short, plan on a minimum of an hour, don't be surprised if longer. If anyone goes with you, there is a sports bar type room in the back with a huge LED tv and they serve beer. My husband enjoyed it. Feel free to tell him that Trillium, Baltimore Jack's friend, sent you.
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      I got Cascadias today and they feel pretty good. A previous pair didn't work because they rubbed my bunion but these dont seem to do that. I plan to wear them all day at work tomorrow to see how they do.

      They are ugly as all get out. I mean UGLY. But if the shoe fits... :)
      They don't look that bad to me. But of course I am a man and do not claim to have great taste in women's shoes. :)

      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Trillium wrote:

      Traffic Jam wrote:

      I just order my third effing pair of shoes, trying to find one that works. My problem is my feet start hurting around mile 6-7 and I'm gritting my teeth by mile 9. Its a general achiness that starts on the part of my foot below my toes and is worse if there is a lot of descending. The pain then travels to my entire foot and lower legs.

      One of my days on my planned BMT hike is 15+ miles. I’m very worried.

      Overuse is my diagnosis as I’m on my feet for most of my 12 hr shifts. Plus, I’ve worn nothing but old chaco’s all summer and think that has done some harm.
      Hi TJ,
      As Astro said, I also recommend going to Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC. Baltimore Jack told me that Rob, the owner, is the best footwear fitter on the trail. After my visit to the store in March, I totally believe it. He is totally and I mean totally knowledgable about feet and what is best for them. He measured my feet in a number of different ways, when you're standing, straight-legged, bent knees, etc, etc. He watched me walk. Tried on about a half dozen different pairs until we found the right ones. He explained that the most important fit is around the heel. He shares his knowledge freely with everyone. He is a really cool guy!

      I bought 2 pair, one for hiking: Hoka Speedgoat 2 and one for everyday (that Rob told me I could also use for hiking): Brooks Dyad 9. So, I've had them for 6 months and LOVE both pair. I've worn the Hokas on 2 hiking trips, just awesome! Two weeks ago I severely injured my right foot and while I normally wear dress shoes to work, the Brooks with their wide toe box and stylish looks, were very comfortable while my foot healed.

      So, even if you don't need a new pair of shoes, if you are ever within a short drive to Franklin, go to Outdoor 76 and ask for Rob to fit you for a pair. And when you do need a new pair, you're close enough to Franklin that I STRONGLY recommend that you go to Outdoor 76 and ask for Rob. Might be a good idea to call in advance to confirm that he will be there and set up an appointment. Your appointment will not be short, plan on a minimum of an hour, don't be surprised if longer. If anyone goes with you, there is a sports bar type room in the back with a huge LED tv and they serve beer. My husband enjoyed it. Feel free to tell him that Trillium, Baltimore Jack's friend, sent you.
      Thank you for the Outdoor 76 recommendation, Astro and Trillium! I will be fairly close this week and I’m trying to get an appointment.

      One of the pairs that I tested is the Hoka One One Hikers. They felt really cushioney and comfortable. But they are heavy, slipped a little in the heels, and my feet were sweating after wearing them for an hour or two because they are waterproof. For me, they would be great, everyday winter shoes to wear with jeans or for a wintry day hike.

      They were nearly just right.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • I have hiked over 500 miles in Hoka One One Clifton2 running shoes and wear them everyday. I just killed my last pair and the new model is Clifton5. What I liked the most about that model is even when the soles are totally shot, they don't slip on wet rocks or street. They are quite cushy and helped my Plantar problem.
    • Unfortunately, I wasnt able to get an appointment with Rob but the Cascadias did well on my recent hike...about 80% better. They allowed me to hike a 15.7 mile day with minimal discomfort. I was diligent with applying body glide and foot powder and ended up with only a small blister on my bunion.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis