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    • I just finished Scott Jurek's book about doing the FKT on the AT. It is quite good! I was also happy with Jennifer Pharr-Davis's book about FKT's on the AT.

      I started reading Doctor Beck Weathers "Left for Dead", his book about the 1996 Everest climb. I'm only 20 percent done, but it is also a good read. But also a hard read, knowing of the fatalities.
      Pirating – Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      I'm continuing onward with my Western mysteries. I've had to go to the other library in town because I've pretty much exhausted the supply at the first one. Yeah it's a small town and I'm glad it is.
      If they run out too, try interlibrary loan (often $1 a book).
      And if you use a Kindle you can join libraries all around the country.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I just finished Doctor Beck Weather's book "Left For Dead". That and "Into Thin Air" (and a few other books) are about the disaster on Everest in 1996. And also the movie "Everest". His book was pretty good! The first 20 percent is about the events. It is told by him, his wife and a few others. But then the rest of the book is about what led him to climb, his depression, other family issues. It read pretty fast and holds interest. It is NOT a "Climbing" book.
      Pirating – Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    • max.patch wrote:

      i just bought a paperback of short stories at costco written by tom hanks. impulse purchase; had no idea he was an author. if he writes just half as good as he acts then this should be $10 well spent.
      You know Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep can really act. Otherwise people would not have paid them all those millions and millions just to look at them. :D
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Moving on from zombies to medieval time travel. ^^

      It’s actually pretty good. If you like history, philosophy, and religion mixed with a little sci-fi (paranormal?), you will like it.

      The Outcasts of Time by Ian Mortimer.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • The Highway Man, A Longmire Story by Craig Johnson. It's about my sixth book by him that I've read, and he's got about that many more that I'll chew thru after this one. Current time mysteries that take place in and around Indian reservations in Wyoming. Really good stuff.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      The Highway Man, A Longmire Story by Craig Johnson. It's about my sixth book by him that I've read, and he's got about that many more that I'll chew thru after this one. Current time mysteries that take place in and around Indian reservations in Wyoming. Really good stuff.
      never read any of the Longmire stuff, but I did enjoy watching a few seasons of the Longmire series on A&E. maybe i'll give the books a try.
    • chief wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      The Highway Man, A Longmire Story by Craig Johnson. It's about my sixth book by him that I've read, and he's got about that many more that I'll chew thru after this one. Current time mysteries that take place in and around Indian reservations in Wyoming. Really good stuff.
      never read any of the Longmire stuff, but I did enjoy watching a few seasons of the Longmire series on A&E. maybe i'll give the books a try.
      I watched the entire Longmire series on Netflix (great until the last episode or so). Sort of like a modern day Gunsmoke.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      chief wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      The Highway Man, A Longmire Story by Craig Johnson. It's about my sixth book by him that I've read, and he's got about that many more that I'll chew thru after this one. Current time mysteries that take place in and around Indian reservations in Wyoming. Really good stuff.
      never read any of the Longmire stuff, but I did enjoy watching a few seasons of the Longmire series on A&E. maybe i'll give the books a try.
      I watched the entire Longmire series on Netflix (great until the last episode or so). Sort of like a modern day Gunsmoke.
      I watched some of them but was ambivalent. Sometimes the story was too dark and a little depressing. Makes me wonder what happens in the last episode. Doesn’t sound good.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      The Highway Man, A Longmire Story by Craig Johnson. It's about my sixth book by him that I've read, and he's got about that many more that I'll chew thru after this one. Current time mysteries that take place in and around Indian reservations in Wyoming. Really good stuff.
      JJ, I think you will like Peter Bowen and you should be able to find his books at the library. It’s modern western mystery. The author sounds like a character...he’s been a fishing guide, cowboy, hunter, poet, folksinger, novelist...

      I was at the library today and tried to remember all my favorite western authors but only came up with a few, Max Brand, Louis L’Amour, Tony Hillerman, Peter Bowen. Will y’all list your favorites?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      The Highway Man, A Longmire Story by Craig Johnson. It's about my sixth book by him that I've read, and he's got about that many more that I'll chew thru after this one. Current time mysteries that take place in and around Indian reservations in Wyoming. Really good stuff.
      JJ, I think you will like Peter Bowen and you should be able to find his books at the library. It’s modern western mystery. The author sounds like a character...he’s been a fishing guide, cowboy, hunter, poet, folksinger, novelist...
      I was at the library today and tried to remember all my favorite western authors but only came up with a few, Max Brand, Louis L’Amour, Tony Hillerman, Peter Bowen. Will y’all list your favorites?
      Tony Hillerman, and now his daughter Anne Hillerman continues the series, William Johnstone, J.A Johnstone, Craig Johnson, Zane Grey, Robert Randisi, Arthur Gooden, John Nesbitt, M. Zimmer, Joan Johnston, Patrick Dearen, Ralph Cotton, Lauren Paine, Mickey Spillane, Robert Vaughn, James Reasoner, Douglas Preston. And those are just the Western writers that I read.
      Yeah I think I have a reading problem and it's a good one. :)
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Just finished "Badlands" by Peter Bowen. Really enjoyed it, suspense, action and humor. Thanks TJ for the recommendation.
      I've had a nasty upper respiratory infection/sinus infection all week so I've done a ton of reading. Worst sore throat I've ever had and constantly coughing up crap kills my throat and I can't sleep so I read. Can't wait to be rid of this URI!!!!!
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Just finished "Badlands" by Peter Bowen. Really enjoyed it, suspense, action and humor. Thanks TJ for the recommendation.
      I've had a nasty upper respiratory infection/sinus infection all week so I've done a ton of reading. Worst sore throat I've ever had and constantly coughing up crap kills my throat and I can't sleep so I read. Can't wait to be rid of this URI!!!!!
      Like was for getting a good book recommendation from TJ. As for being sick hope you are over it is soon.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • jimmyjam wrote:

      Just finished "Badlands" by Peter Bowen. Really enjoyed it, suspense, action and humor. Thanks TJ for the recommendation.
      I've had a nasty upper respiratory infection/sinus infection all week so I've done a ton of reading. Worst sore throat I've ever had and constantly coughing up crap kills my throat and I can't sleep so I read. Can't wait to be rid of this URI!!!!!
      I hope you are feeling better! Do you use a humidifier?
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Traffic Jam wrote:

      jimmyjam wrote:

      Just finished "Badlands" by Peter Bowen. Really enjoyed it, suspense, action and humor. Thanks TJ for the recommendation.
      I've had a nasty upper respiratory infection/sinus infection all week so I've done a ton of reading. Worst sore throat I've ever had and constantly coughing up crap kills my throat and I can't sleep so I read. Can't wait to be rid of this URI!!!!!
      I hope you are feeling better! Do you use a humidifier?
      No humidifier, maybe I should get one. I do have one of those little steamer like things you put water in and can put Vick's vapor rub in it. I finally turned the corner on this thing today. I have lived on the coach for six days! I think I'm about to get bed sores.lol.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • Went to hear Michael Pullara last night, who wrote The Spy Left Behind. He was almost as good as his book which I got Saturday and had a hard time putting it down until I finished it. He is a corporate lawyer who spent several years of his own time and money researching the murder of CIA agent Freddie Woodruff.
      Images
      • IMG_20190223_183747054.jpg

        95.57 kB, 337×600, viewed 17 times
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I had been keeping a list in a notebook of all the books I read since my knee surgery in December of 2017. Today I entered them in an Excel spreadsheet to make it easier to keep track of them. 87 books! Yeah I'd rather read than watch people shooting each other on TV.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • i just finished "the president is missing" by james patterson and bill clinton. and while i have no illusions that bill clintion was hunched over a laptop typing away, it's obvious patterson consulted with him on a large portion of the book.

      i enjoyed the book, and, as a matter of fact, just bought "the first lady" by patterson. it's another political book; shortly after the revelation that the president had been involved in an affair with another women his wife goes missing and $100 million ransom is demanded.

      bill clinton is not credited on this book but i'm sure he could have added a lot as a consultant. :)

      (since i complimented the patterson/clinton book i feel it necessary to add that i hate the clintons and this post may be the first positive thing i've ever said about bill.)
      2,000 miler
    • max.patch wrote:

      i just finished "the president is missing" by james patterson and bill clinton. and while i have no illusions that bill clintion was hunched over a laptop typing away, it's obvious patterson consulted with him on a large portion of the book.

      i enjoyed the book, and, as a matter of fact, just bought "the first lady" by patterson. it's another political book; shortly after the revelation that the president had been involved in an affair with another women his wife goes missing and $100 million ransom is demanded.

      bill clinton is not credited on this book but i'm sure he could have added a lot as a consultant. :)

      (since i complimented the patterson/clinton book i feel it necessary to add that i hate the clintons and this post may be the first positive thing i've ever said about bill.)
      Having met the man in person and knowing many others who have interacted with him, the general consensus is that you may think he is the scum of the earth and not agree with him on anything, but you still have to admire his ability to work a room.
      He truly is gifted in some areas. Perhaps he had a good guidance counselor early on who read his personality and told him you should be a lawyer and go into politics.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Just the other day I finished reading UNBROKEN, A World War II Story Of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. Without giving away any details, it's a story of an American aircrew shot down over the Pacific Ocean and how some of them survived floating over 45 days in a raft. Thy were then captured by the Japanese and treated brutally as POWs. The really interesting part was how their lives were once Japan lost the war and they came home.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Just the other day I finished reading UNBROKEN, A World War II Story Of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. Without giving away any details, it's a story of an American aircrew shot down over the Pacific Ocean and how some of them survived floating over 45 days in a raft. Thy were then captured by the Japanese and treated brutally as POWs. The really interesting part was how their lives were once Japan lost the war and they came home.
      It is well written and good, but I enjoyed his autobiography better, Devil at my Heels.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Just the other day I finished reading UNBROKEN, A World War II Story Of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. Without giving away any details, it's a story of an American aircrew shot down over the Pacific Ocean and how some of them survived floating over 45 days in a raft. Thy were then captured by the Japanese and treated brutally as POWs. The really interesting part was how their lives were once Japan lost the war and they came home.
      It is well written and good, but I enjoyed his autobiography better, Devil at my Heels.
      After our Maine hike I'll look and see if our local library has that one.
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Just the other day I finished reading UNBROKEN, A World War II Story Of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. Without giving away any details, it's a story of an American aircrew shot down over the Pacific Ocean and how some of them survived floating over 45 days in a raft. Thy were then captured by the Japanese and treated brutally as POWs. The really interesting part was how their lives were once Japan lost the war and they came home.
      read it and saw the movie.

      either the plane crash and time spent on the raft or the time as a POW could stand alone as a book. the fact that he endured both of those experiences is an incredible story.
      2,000 miler
    • LIhikers wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Just the other day I finished reading UNBROKEN, A World War II Story Of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. Without giving away any details, it's a story of an American aircrew shot down over the Pacific Ocean and how some of them survived floating over 45 days in a raft. Thy were then captured by the Japanese and treated brutally as POWs. The really interesting part was how their lives were once Japan lost the war and they came home.
      It is well written and good, but I enjoyed his autobiography better, Devil at my Heels.
      After our Maine hike I'll look and see if our local library has that one.
      If not, see if they can get it with interlibrary loan (most just charge $1).
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • I’m reading The Practice of Practice. It’s about practice strategies and mindsets for learning to play music. It’s fascinating and eye opening.

      Even though it’s geared towards music, the concepts can be applied to attaining any personal goal.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Astro wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      LIhikers wrote:

      Just the other day I finished reading UNBROKEN, A World War II Story Of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. Without giving away any details, it's a story of an American aircrew shot down over the Pacific Ocean and how some of them survived floating over 45 days in a raft. Thy were then captured by the Japanese and treated brutally as POWs. The really interesting part was how their lives were once Japan lost the war and they came home.
      It is well written and good, but I enjoyed his autobiography better, Devil at my Heels.
      After our Maine hike I'll look and see if our local library has that one.
      If not, see if they can get it with interlibrary loan (most just charge $1).
      Actually I can get any book, in any library in the county, for free.
      There's a small charge for other county.
    • Just finished Blazing Ahead: Benton MacKaye, Myron Avery, and the Rivalry that Built the Appalachian Trail.
      A little disappointed as the author focused more on the archives of their writings than what they actually did. Expecting more about how Avery actually built the trail. Instead focused more on the disagreements in letters he had with publishers (including the AMC).
      Most significant thing I learned is that Avery worked full time was in the Navy during WW 1 & 2, and worked full a maritime lawyer while building the the AT and leading the ATC.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General