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AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

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    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      I consider AWOL on the Appalachian Trail one of the best books written about the AT. It is by David Miller who now publishes the A.T. Guide each year.

      David Miller was a programmer when he decided to thru-hike the AT. Unable to obtain a Leave Of Absence (LOA), he still decides to take off on his thru-hike, but hedging his bet the first few weeks by using up his vacation before his boss processes his letter of resignation (thus Away With Out Leave). He has a wife and children at home, and a brother who had thru-hiked several years before (in jeans just like our own Mountain Mike). Miller writes in a daily journal format, but weaves his story so it flows better than just reading a normal trail journal. One of the greatest strengths of the book is that he helps you feel like you are there with him. He shares both the highs and the lows, painting what I believe is a realistic picture. He shares both what he is experiencing and how he feels about it. He comes across as a guy you would want to be friends with and hike with.

      I would recommend this book for anyone who is planning a thru-hike, wants to know more about hiking the AT, or enjoys reading about other peoples adventures.

      Rate: 5/5

      http://www.amazon.com/AWOL-Appalachian-Trail-David-Miller/dp/0547745524/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1388033936&sr=8-1&keywords=awol
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      Astro wrote:

      I consider AWOL on the Appalachian Trail one of the best books written about the AT. It is by David Miller who now publishes the A.T. Guide each year.

      David Miller was a programmer when he decided to thru-hike the AT. Unable to obtain a Leave Of Absence (LOA), he still decides to take off on his thru-hike, but hedging his bet the first few weeks by using up his vacation before his boss processes his letter of resignation (thus Away With Out Leave). He has a wife and children at home, and a brother who had thru-hiked several years before (in jeans just like our own Mountain Mike). Miller writes in a daily journal format, but weaves his story so it flows better than just reading a normal trail journal. One of the greatest strengths of the book is that he helps you feel like you are there with him. He shares both the highs and the lows, painting what I believe is a realistic picture. He shares both what he is experiencing and how he feels about it. He comes across as a guy you would want to be friends with and hike with.

      I would recommend this book for anyone who is planning a thru-hike, wants to know more about hiking the AT, or enjoys reading about other peoples adventures.

      Rate: 5/5

      http://www.amazon.com/AWOL-Appalachian-Trail-David-Miller/dp/0547745524/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1388033936&sr=8-1&keywords=awol
      I concur, 5/5 I have it on audio for when I walk
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      rocksNsocks wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      I consider AWOL on the Appalachian Trail one of the best books written about the AT. It is by David Miller who now publishes the A.T. Guide each year.

      David Miller was a programmer when he decided to thru-hike the AT. Unable to obtain a Leave Of Absence (LOA), he still decides to take off on his thru-hike, but hedging his bet the first few weeks by using up his vacation before his boss processes his letter of resignation (thus Away With Out Leave). He has a wife and children at home, and a brother who had thru-hiked several years before (in jeans just like our own Mountain Mike). Miller writes in a daily journal format, but weaves his story so it flows better than just reading a normal trail journal. One of the greatest strengths of the book is that he helps you feel like you are there with him. He shares both the highs and the lows, painting what I believe is a realistic picture. He shares both what he is experiencing and how he feels about it. He comes across as a guy you would want to be friends with and hike with.

      I would recommend this book for anyone who is planning a thru-hike, wants to know more about hiking the AT, or enjoys reading about other peoples adventures.

      Rate: 5/5

      http://www.amazon.com/AWOL-Appalachian-Trail-David-Miller/dp/0547745524/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1388033936&sr=8-1&keywords=awol
      I concur, 5/5 I have it on audio for when I walk


      I just finished it and really liked it. I love hearing peoples stories and perspectives.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".
      Resident Australian, proving being a grumpy old man is not just an American trait.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      I'll read that next, thanks for the recommendation Oz.

      Hey, I think you need to do a book report.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I feel your pain brother! Not just with the recent injury to my back but my right knee was injured while playing hockey just after high school in a hideous boarding incident that left me sidelined for the longest time. I admire people who fight through the pain because my outlook is just like yours "The hike is worth the pain."
      "You might not get everything you want out of life, but you will get exactly what you need!"-Dakota Joe 2006
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.


      Honestly, that pisses me off. What a judgmental B! Some people just aren't worth a second thought or worry. Exchanging a few sentences doesn't give anyone the right to write shit about someone,
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.


      Honestly, that pisses me off. What a judgmental B! Some people just aren't worth a second thought or worry. Exchanging a few sentences doesn't give anyone the right to write shit about someone,


      Oh crap, I said shit. Crap! I did it again.
      gif.002
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.


      Honestly, that pisses me off. What a judgmental B! Some people just aren't worth a second thought or worry. Exchanging a few sentences doesn't give anyone the right to write shit about someone,


      I hold no hard feelings towards her. She seemed very pleasant on the trail. She is just guilty of what I do all the time: She said what was on her mind. I am glad to know how I am perceived. It is almost impossible to see yourself. I am better equipped because of her honesty.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      TrafficJam wrote:



      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      Yes. That makes perfect sense. My critic was not struggling. Had she been struggling she would have viewed me differently. I would have been an encouragement to her. After all, I was on my last leg (of my SoBo) and was succeeding.
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.


      Honestly, that pisses me off. What a judgmental B! Some people just aren't worth a second thought or worry. Exchanging a few sentences doesn't give anyone the right to write shit about someone,


      I hold no hard feelings towards her. She seemed very pleasant on the trail. She is just guilty of what I do all the time: She said what was on her mind. I am glad to know how I am perceived. It is almost impossible to see yourself. I am better equipped because of her honesty.


      I'm agreeing to disagree, BB. :) No one can accurately assess a person based on a short, random encounter and their biased opinions shouldn't be given ANY power over us. Yes, we all do it, but most of us realize that it's wrong and keep it locked away, not record those ugly thoughts for the public. That is exceptionally bad form.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.


      Honestly, that pisses me off. What a judgmental B! Some people just aren't worth a second thought or worry. Exchanging a few sentences doesn't give anyone the right to write shit about someone,


      I hold no hard feelings towards her. She seemed very pleasant on the trail. She is just guilty of what I do all the time: She said what was on her mind. I am glad to know how I am perceived. It is almost impossible to see yourself. I am better equipped because of her honesty.


      I'm agreeing to disagree, BB. :) No one can accurately assess a person based on a short, random encounter and their biased opinions shouldn't be given ANY power over us. Yes, we all do it, but most of us realize that it's wrong and keep it locked away, not record those ugly thoughts for the public. That is exceptionally bad form.


      Sounds like I need to take you on my walks so you can cover my back. ;) I could just walk away and let you at them. Nothing to see here folks. TJ is just taking out the trash. :lol:
      Non hikers are about a psi shy of a legal ball.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      TrafficJam wrote:

      BirdBrain wrote:

      OzJacko wrote:

      I came away with the overwhelming idea that he hiked the whole way in pain.
      His knees (I think it's a long time since I read it) were giving him trouble the whole way.
      I liked Robert Rubin's book better "On tbe Beaten Path".


      Some of us do hike in pain. It is the only option other than not hiking. I have meniscus issues. I mentioned my legs a lot on my SoBo. It wasn't until I read about myself on a blog that I realized the effect it was having on others. I was being viewed as a whiner to one lady. For me, it was like talking about the weather. If it is raining, what do you do? Do you cancel the hike? My legs were killing me at times. It is a pain that cannot be fully described. Coming down South Crocker, I was almost in tears. It is just pain though. It is nothing worth cancelling a hike over. The hike is worth the pain. I can't wait for the Whites. One thing is certain: I will not mention my legs to strangers on the trail. They have no pity. I will, however, gladly console and encourage anyone that mentions their pain to me. I feel their pain.


      I'm sorry to hear how the others thought of you BB.

      When I'm struggling and hurting, it's hard to hear someone else talk about their struggle, it makes it harder for me to deal with my own. When I'm around someone who's struggling but positive, I know I can do it too. Does that make sense?

      We should be able to tell others how we're feeling and be supportive of each other but I agree there's a fine line between looking for encouragement from someone and whining.

      I often find myself being the cheerleader for struggling, middle-aged women in my numerous activities because I'm really cheering and encouraging myself.

      I guess it's all in the attitude.


      When I mentioned it on the trail, I honestly wasn't looking for a reaction. I was just making small talk. I say what is on my mind. It makes for a quick wit, but also gets me in trouble. Crossing paths several times with a red head who was doing 4000' hills opened my eyes to how some people view a person like me. I talk with every person I cross paths with. We exchanged ideas and experiences. I gave her good information on some of the 4000's she was yet to do. I also mentioned my legs. I could barely stand one day when I met her. I was having a great time too. It is what it is. When I got home, I looked for her journal. I was shocked to see that I was 2 people in her journal. I was a pleasant and helping person and I was a complaining whiner. I honestly wasn't complaining. It is like saying Sugarloaf is steep and hard, but the views are great. All are true. Stating the facts is not complaining. I don't have to hike. I could just sit home. If I hike, there will be pain. It is what it is. Little red riding hood taught me to shut up about it.


      Honestly, that pisses me off. What a judgmental B! Some people just aren't worth a second thought or worry. Exchanging a few sentences doesn't give anyone the right to write shit about someone,


      I hold no hard feelings towards her. She seemed very pleasant on the trail. She is just guilty of what I do all the time: She said what was on her mind. I am glad to know how I am perceived. It is almost impossible to see yourself. I am better equipped because of her honesty.


      I'm agreeing to disagree, BB. :) No one can accurately assess a person based on a short, random encounter and their biased opinions shouldn't be given ANY power over us. Yes, we all do it, but most of us realize that it's wrong and keep it locked away, not record those ugly thoughts for the public. That is exceptionally bad form.


      Sounds like I need to take you on my walks so you can cover my back. ;) I could just walk away and let you at them. Nothing to see here folks. TJ is just taking out the trash. :lol:


      Grrrr, no one insults my cyber friends and gets away with it.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      BB. I'm sorry you have so much pain when you hike.
      I mentioned my observation of AWOL's book but I did still enjoy reading it.
      I like to hike but am not sure I could if I was in pain all the time.
      I may do a post listing all the (many) AT books I have read and a quick critique of each.
      For now I have to go as we are off to do another market stall at Denmark on our south coast.
      May pop in by phone but pc will not be until Sunday night.
      Resident Australian, proving being a grumpy old man is not just an American trait.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      hikerboy wrote:

      honestly,although it gave you a good picture of thru hiking, i found it rather depressing and indulgent, but i find most at books read that way.


      Thought I was the only one....
      Not that he cares, and no offense to SGT ROCK- but he can easily console himself with creating the single greatest guidebook in history.
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      Just Bill wrote:

      hikerboy wrote:

      honestly,although it gave you a good picture of thru hiking, i found it rather depressing and indulgent, but i find most at books read that way.


      Thought I was the only one....
      Not that he cares, and no offense to SGT ROCK- but he can easily console himself with creating the single greatest guidebook in history.


      I'm curious. What exactly did you find depressing? I've never thru'd so have no frame of reference but thought the book was what I imagine it would be like.
      In life there are no limitations. Except stupidity. If you're stupid, you're screwed.

      Stephan Pastis
    • Re:Re: AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      TrafficJam wrote:

      Just Bill wrote:

      hikerboy wrote:

      honestly,although it gave you a good picture of thru hiking, i found it rather depressing and indulgent, but i find most at books read that way.


      Thought I was the only one....
      Not that he cares, and no offense to SGT ROCK- but he can easily console himself with creating the single greatest guidebook in history.


      I'm curious. What exactly did you find depressing? I've never thru'd so have no frame of reference but thought the book was what I imagine it would be like.
      a little too much over indulgence in his various midlife crises
      its all good
    • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller

      Just Bill wrote:

      hikerboy wrote:

      honestly,although it gave you a good picture of thru hiking, i found it rather depressing and indulgent, but i find most at books read that way.


      Thought I was the only one....
      Not that he cares, and no offense to SGT ROCK- but he can easily console himself with creating the single greatest guidebook in history.
      No offense taken. I agree. Awol's guidebooks ended up doing something I had wanted from guidebooks for a while. I was not satisfied with the Companion or Wingfoot's book at the time and Awol figured out ways to make information less cluttered. Awol is also my publisher.
    • I liked Awol's book a lot, but I honestly enjoyed Wild more. I think it had to do with how much I was able to identify with Cheryl Strayed, but in my opinion, Awol's book beat "A Walk in the Woods" hands-down. Gotta admire someone who can ignore pain and keep walking like he did.
      www.appalachiantrailclarity.com - Life on the A.T.

      Sometimes you find yourself in the middle of nowhere, and sometimes in the middle of nowhere, you find yourself.
    • gypsy97 wrote:

      I'm a little confused. Is AWOL's book written by the same person who does AWOL's Guides? The AWOL I know of is on the PCT-L (mailing list), and writes her own guides to the PCT, CDT, AT, etc. I believe her name is Jackie O'Connell, but not sure of the last name?

      written by david miller(AWOL) who also wrote the trail journal-like book awol on the appalachian trail
      its all good