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Bear spray?

    • oldie but a goodie:

      In light of the rising frequency of human/grizzly bear confrontations, the Montana Department of Fish and Game is advising hikers, hunters, and fishermen to take extra precautions and be alert for bears while in the field. …We advise that outdoorsmen wear small bells on their clothing so as not to startle bears that aren’t expecting them, and to carry pepper spray with them in case of an encounter….

      It is also a good idea to watch out for fresh signs of bear activity. Outdoorsmen should recognize the difference between black bear and grizzly bear droppings. Black bear droppings are smaller and contain lots of berries and fur. Grizzly bear droppings have little bells in it and smell like pepper.
      2,000 miler
    • Bo Peep wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Monica999 wrote:

      twistwrist wrote:

      , pay Does anyone take bear spray? I'm trying to justify the heavy 12 ounces. Deep down, I know if I ever needed it while hiking alone (to fend of anything or anyone), it would be worth its weight in gold.
      I use it constantly! To the bear didn't attack you, you need to hang a bell around your neck. The bell tinkles them away. It's also useful to scare off bears with pepper cans. There are different sprays like here bestoutdooritems.com/best-bear-spray/ the main problem is that it only works during spraying, and it's not necessary to spray it on yourself (clothes) because that this will attract the bear to you))
      the bears love to hear the tinkle of the dinner bell and eagerly await the approaching meal.
      Is that the ice cream man/woman I hear?
      Monica, pay no attention to these knuckleheads, they like to tease. :)
      Thanks for pointing that out :)
    • Jake Ace wrote:

      Bo Peep wrote:

      Dan76 wrote:

      max.patch wrote:

      Monica999 wrote:

      twistwrist wrote:

      , pay Does anyone take bear spray? I'm trying to justify the heavy 12 ounces. Deep down, I know if I ever needed it while hiking alone (to fend of anything or anyone), it would be worth its weight in gold.
      I use it constantly! To the bear didn't attack you, you need to hang a bell around your neck. The bell tinkles them away. It's also useful to scare off bears with pepper cans. There are different sprays like here bestoutdooritems.com/best-bear-spray/ the main problem is that it only works during spraying, and it's not necessary to spray it on yourself (clothes) because that this will attract the bear to you))
      the bears love to hear the tinkle of the dinner bell and eagerly await the approaching meal.
      Is that the ice cream man/woman I hear?
      Monica, pay no attention to these knuckleheads, they like to tease. :)
      Thanks for pointing that out :)
      Knucklehead, now that would make a good trail name.
      "Dazed and Confused"
      Recycle, re-use, re-purpose
      Plant a tree
      Take a kid hiking
      Make a difference
    • I found this NOLS presentation by Tom Smith to be informative, persuasive, and worth your consideration. It's a bit Alaska-centric, but also addresses black bears ... it does not exclusively focus on grizzlies. It's long, but entertaining and interesting throughout.



      tl;dv: He recommends spray (40:00) over bells (29:10) and firearms (37:45), and hiking with 1 or more partners. Would love to see an update of this; it dates to 2012.

      [Stephen Herrero is another serious researcher in the field whose findings I would take to heart.]
    • Drybones wrote:

      Okay, who's going to be the one to tell us how you can distinguish a black bear from a grizzly by looking at their poop?
      Take a stick (or fingers) and poke around in black bear scat you see pieces of bone from small animals and berries, with grizzlies you see larger bones and fur, berries, with a pepper smell and find tiny silver bells mixed in.
      I may grow old but I'll never grow up.
    • Time Zone wrote:

      I found this NOLS presentation by Tom Smith to be informative, persuasive, and worth your consideration. It's a bit Alaska-centric, but also addresses black bears ... it does not exclusively focus on grizzlies. It's long, but entertaining and interesting throughout.



      tl;dv: He recommends spray (40:00) over bells (29:10) and firearms (37:45), and hiking with 1 or more partners. Would love to see an update of this; it dates to 2012.

      [Stephen Herrero is another serious researcher in the field whose findings I would take to heart.]
      I've seen this video. His story about bells is hilarious. As are many of his comments about people with well intentioned, yet misguided information. I recently looked for where he may have published the bell research but could not find it. I wonder if he never did.
    • In NYC I understand that hunger has driven the rats have become a bit more aggressive and fearless of humans when Covid shut some of their restaurant food sources down.

      I wonder if fewer campers, hikers and such in the Smokies has had the same result with the bears? Just thinking out loud, who knows what happened here.
      “Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
      the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


      John Greenleaf Whittier
    • IMScotty wrote:

      In NYC I understand that hunger has driven the rats have become a bit more aggressive and fearless of humans when Covid shut some of their restaurant food sources down.

      I wonder if fewer campers, hikers and such in the Smokies has had the same result with the bears? Just thinking out loud, who knows what happened here.
      I understand the theory, but I have gone hiking in state parks the last two Saturday's (still need to post pictures and details), and the crowds are out there. I would assume it is probably the same at GSMNP.
      The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
      Richard Ewell, CSA General
    • Astro wrote:

      IMScotty wrote:

      In NYC I understand that hunger has driven the rats have become a bit more aggressive and fearless of humans when Covid shut some of their restaurant food sources down.

      I wonder if fewer campers, hikers and such in the Smokies has had the same result with the bears? Just thinking out loud, who knows what happened here.
      I understand the theory, but I have gone hiking in state parks the last two Saturday's (still need to post pictures and details), and the crowds are out there. I would assume it is probably the same at GSMNP.
      I was at gsmnp past couple days.
      More dayhikers than you can imagine at chimney top, alum cave trail heads. Cars blocking 441 because parked several inches in road hundreds of yds from trailhead. Not a single empty park space at newfound gsp or clingmans dome.

      Busiest weekend of year for Gatlinburg/pigeon forge. Not a single empty room. Took 3+ hrs to drive from gatlinburg to pigeon forge.....traffic....just a couple miles. There was car weekend at pigeon forge.....a "rod run". Basically this is when everybody who has some form of older vehicle brings it there because they want to sell it. Seriously, at least 75% have for sale signs on them.

      Zero shortage of people...... In fact more than I've ever seen. A few people wearing masks but really minimal social distancing.

      We stayed in a cabin a few days for a wedding there. But the place was as packed as possible. Gsmnp too.

      We didn't see any bears but a friend in the wedding party had bears right behind their cabin..... But I don't think there's anything unusual about that.......

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Muddywaters ().

    • Astro wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      Yellowstone August visitation was up over last year and close to record levels.

      nps.gov/yell/learn/news/20038.htm
      For any parks that charges for services this could be a positive, unless they end with their resources being stressed to much by it.
      Actually, the last time I went to Yellowstone (June 13, 1998) we entered at the relatively quiet NE entrance in the morning before there was anyone there to take our money. Someday I will get around sending the NPS the 20 bucks I owe them.
    • odd man out wrote:

      Astro wrote:

      odd man out wrote:

      Yellowstone August visitation was up over last year and close to record levels.

      nps.gov/yell/learn/news/20038.htm
      For any parks that charges for services this could be a positive, unless they end with their resources being stressed to much by it.
      Actually, the last time I went to Yellowstone (June 13, 1998) we entered at the relatively quiet NE entrance in the morning before there was anyone there to take our money. Someday I will get around sending the NPS the 20 bucks I owe them.
      The Cooke City Entrance? It is not always manned.............but the Cooke City Saloon always has plenty of pretty waitresses! They don't speak English very well.......but, do they have to?
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup:
    • CoachLou wrote:

      The Cooke City Entrance? It is not always manned.............but the Cooke City Saloon always has plenty of pretty waitresses! They don't speak English very well.......but, do they have to?
      Yes. We spent the night at a cute mom and pop motel in downtown Red Lodge. I remeber the date as it was our son's birthday. We drove over the Beartooth pass which had just opened. But we saw nothing as crews cleared the road by cutting through 15 feet of snow so it was like driving through a tunnel. Driving through Cooke City my wife said she wanted to retire there. Very cute. But didn't stop at the Saloon. What language do they speak in Cooke City?
    • odd man out wrote:

      CoachLou wrote:

      The Cooke City Entrance? It is not always manned.............but the Cooke City Saloon always has plenty of pretty waitresses! They don't speak English very well.......but, do they have to?
      Yes. We spent the night at a cute mom and pop motel in downtown Red Lodge. I remeber the date as it was our son's birthday. We drove over the Beartooth pass which had just opened. But we saw nothing as crews cleared the road by cutting through 15 feet of snow so it was like driving through a tunnel. Driving through Cooke City my wife said she wanted to retire there. Very cute. But didn't stop at the Saloon. What language do they speak in Cooke City?
      The language of the Green Yankee Dollar!!!!
      Cheesecake> Ramen :thumbsup: